Does Anybody Know Details Of Why The Dates Of Easter Changed?

Could someone help me with this?

If the early Christians and the 1st Easter was celebrated on the 1st day of the week after the Passover Sabbath, why is it now celebrated "on the first Sunday after the Pascal full moon which happens on or after the official Vernal Equinox (March 21)??? If Passover is this week, why isn’t Easter any longer AFTER Passover?

Who, when, and why was it changed? Does anyone know the details?

Thx for your help.

it changes every year… it’s tied to the fisrt sunday after or before the first full moon of the spring equinox…

i think,… i always get messed up on this one.

see below…
[list]
*]Easter falls on the first Sunday following the first ecclesiastical full moon that occurs on or after the day of the vernal equinox;
*]this particular ecclesiastical full moon is the 14th day of a tabular lunation (new moon); and
*]the vernal equinox is fixed as March 21.
[/list]

[quote=LoneRanger]it changes every year… it’s tied to the fisrt sunday after or before the first full moon of the spring equinox…

i think,… i always get messed up on this one.

see below…
[list]
*]Easter falls on the first Sunday following the first ecclesiastical full moon that occurs on or after the day of the vernal equinox;
*]this particular ecclesiastical full moon is the 14th day of a tabular lunation (new moon); and
*]the vernal equinox is fixed as March 21.
[/list]
[/quote]

Yes, I know what it is NOW. You did not answer my question.

[quote=sparkle]Yes, I know what it is NOW. You did not answer my question.
[/quote]

sorry, i’m guilty of assuming, without reading completely… also i am moving through more than one thread at a time… my apologies…
I do not know the answer for sure, but i suspect the Church changed it years ago, and that’s the obvious guess… i’m sure some of our self proclaimed apologist will help you…

mea culpa…

Peace…

The connection between the Jewish Passover and the Christian feast of Easter is real since Christ died on the first Jewish Easter Day. Christ’s death and Resurrection had its figures and types in the Old Law, particularly in the paschal lamb, which was eaten towards evening of the 14th of Nisan. In fact, the Jewish feast was taken over into the Christian Easter celebration; the liturgy (Exsultet) sings of the passing of Israel through the Red Sea, the paschal lamb, the column of fire, etc. Apart, however, from the Jewish feast, the Christians would have celebrated the anniversary of the death and the Resurrection of Christ. But for such a feast it was necessary to know the exact calendar date of Christ’s death. To know this day was very simple for the Jews; it was the day after the 14th of the first month, the 15th of Nisan of their calendar. But in other countries of the vast Roman Empire there were other systems of chronology. The Romans from 45 B.C. had used the reformed Julian calendar; there were also the Egyptian and the Syro-Macedonian calendar. The foundation of the Jewish calendar was the lunar year of 354 days, whilst the other systems depended on the solar year. In consequence the first days of the Jewish months and years did not coincide with any fixed days of the Roman solar year. Every fourth year of the Jewish system had an intercalary month. Since this month was inserted, not according to some scientific method or some definite rule, but arbitrarily, by command of the Sanhedrin, a distant Jewish date can never with certainty be transposed into the corresponding Julian or Gregorian date (Ideler, Chronologie, I, 570 sq.). The connection between the Jewish and the Christian Pasch explains the movable character of this feast. Easter has no fixed date, like Christmas, because the 15th of Nisan of the Semitic calendar was shifting from date to date on the Julian calendar. Since Christ, the true Paschal Lamb, had been slain on the very day when the Jews, in celebration of their Passover, immolated the figurative lamb, the Jewish Christians in the Orient followed the Jewish method, and commemorated the death of Christ on the 15th of Nisan and His Resurrection on the 17th of Nisan, no matter on what day of the week they fell. For this observance they claimed the authority of St. John and St. Philip.

In the rest of the empire another consideration predominated. Every Sunday of the year was a commemoration of the Resurrection of Christ, which had occurred on a Sunday. Because the Sunday after 14 Nisan was the historical day of the Resurrection, at Rome this Sunday became the Christian feast of Easter. Easter was celebrated in Rome and Alexandria on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the spring equinox, and the Roman Church claimed for this observance the authority of Sts. Peter and Paul. The spring equinox in Rome fell on 25 March; in Alexandria on 21 March. At Antioch Easter was kept on the Sunday after the Jewish Passover. (See EASTER CONTROVERSY.) In Gaul a number of bishops, wishing to escape the difficulties of the paschal computation, seem to have assigned Easter to a fixed date of the Roman calendar, celebrating the death of Christ on 25 March, His Resurrection on 27 March (Marinus Dumiensis in P.L., LXXII, 47-51), since already in the third century 25 March was considered the day of the Crucifixion (Computus Pseudocyprianus, ed. Lersch, Chronologie, II, 61). This practice was of short duration. Many calendars in the Middle Ages contain these same dates (25 March, 27 March) for purely historical, not liturgical, reasons (Grotenfend, Zeitrechnung, II, 46, 60, 72, 106, 110, etc.). The Montanists in Asia Minor kept Easter on the Sunday after 6 April (Schmid, Osterfestberechnung in der abendlandischen Kirche). The First Council of Nicaea (325) decreed that the Roman practice should be observed throughout the Church. But even at Rome the Easter term was changed repeatedly. Those who continued to keep Easter with the Jews were called Quartodecimans (14 Nisan) and were excluded from the Church. The computus paschalis, the method of determining the date of Easter and the dependent feasts, was of old considered so important that Durandus (Rit. div. off., 8, c.i.) declares a priest unworthy of the name who does not know the computus paschalis. The movable character of Easter (22 March to 25 April) gives rise to inconveniences, especially in modern times. For decades scientists and other people have worked in vain for a simplification of the computus, assigning Easter to the first Sunday in April or to the Sunday nearest the 7th of April. Some even wish to put every Sunday to a certain date of the month, e.g. beginning with New Year’s always on a Sunday, etc. [See L. Günther, “Zeitschrift Weltall” (1903); Sandhage and P. Dueren in “Pastor bonus” (Trier, 1906); C. Tondini, “L’Italia e la questione del Calendario” (Florence, 1905).]

Jews still use their own calendar to find the time of their holidays. We use the Gregorian calendar.
Now, before we went to that, we used the Julian calendar. The change came in the 18th century. For how that affected the date of Easter, you would have to check someone who knows more than I do about it, but I assume that the fact that we are dealing with not 1,not even 2, but 3 different caledars is the reason for the difference.

[quote=Zooey]Jews still use their own calendar to find the time of their holidays. We use the Gregorian calendar.
Now, before we went to that, we used the Julian calendar. The change came in the 18th century. For how that affected the date of Easter, you would have to check someone who knows more than I do about it, but I assume that the fact that we are dealing with not 1,not even 2, but 3 different caledars is the reason for the difference.
[/quote]

Got it! Just the answer I was looking for. Does anybody know though why the calendar change from the Jewish calendar? And what made the change in the 18th century? And why? And who? Was it the Pope at the time?

The Julian calendar was inaccurate because it calculated leap years wrong. Spring was supposed to be about the 21st of March, but because of the wrong number of leap years being inserted over about 1500 years, gradually the Julian calendar slipped out of sync with the solar year.

This was corrected with the switch to the Gregorian calendar, when the date was jumped ahead about 10 days in one night. Because the Orthodox had already split from the Catholics, and relations between the two churches were not good at the time, the Orthodox did not jump their calendar ahead at the same time. Therefore, they celebrate Easter on a different date than us. About 6 years out of 7 (or so), our Easter coincides exactly with Passover, and the Orthodox are “late”. 2005 is one of those odd years - we celebrated Easter earlier than Passover, but Orthodox Easter (Pascha) aligns exactly.

The mis-alignment of Easter and Passover every 6 or 7 years leads to another question. In non-Catholic churches, particularly the strongly anti-Catholic ones, why do they still celebrate Easter on the date designated by the Catholic church?

Think about it. If our Catholic scriptures were not good enough for them - if they had to go back to the “true” Hebrew bible and throw out a bunch of OT books - why did they not also throw out our calculation of Easter and choose to celebrate it with the Jewish Passover, whenever that may be? Hmmmmmm???

[quote=Zooey]Jews still use their own calendar to find the time of their holidays. We use the Gregorian calendar.
Now, before we went to that, we used the Julian calendar. The change came in the 18th century.
[/quote]

The 1st Council of Nicea in 326AD determined how to calculate the date of Paska (Easter).

Pope Gregory created the Gregorian calendar that went into effect in October 1582.

Many countries did not adopt the Gregorian calendar until much later. Great Britain adopted it in 18th century and Russia did not adopt it until 1918 after the Revolution.

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