Does attending saturday mass for a First Saturday devotion fulfill your Sunday obligation?

I am currently doing the First Saturday devotions to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. My parish only has one mass on Saturdays (which is the Sunday mass) and I am wondering if attending this mass while completing the devotion, as I am offering up the mass and communion to the Blessed Mother, also fulfills my Sunday obligation?

Thank-you for your time & help in answering my question.

Unless I’ve missed something, canonically your obligation for any Holy Day of Obligation can be fulfilled at any Mass the day of or the evening before (so a Saturday evening Mass would fulfill the Sunday obligation, regardless of the reason why you’re there).

Yep. If the mass is after 4:00, then it counts for your obligation.
If it’s on Saturday (it appears it is), then it fulfills first Sat. (as far as I know).

I was told by my priest, that no mass that is part of the Sunday obligation (mass after 4pm Saturday) should be counted as fulfilling the First Saturday devotions. The readings are different for one thing, but if this is the only mass you can attend and is offered by your parish, maybe you should consult your priest for clarification.

The requirement is to attend Mass on the first Saturday, not attend the Mass on the first Saturday that isn’t the vigil for Sunday.

This has come up here before. I think, ideally, the requirement should be for the Saturday Mass, but technically the Saturday vigil should still fulfill it. In any event, one shouldn’t get too hung up with the details. Remember that it is the internal disposition and intent that is of prime importance.

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I would seek the advice and clarification of your priest in this matter.

We need to be aware of the way the Church sees the celebration of Sunday. It begins on what in the civil calendar is still Saturday evening. However, for the Church Saturday is over and Sunday has begun.

The Mass celebrated on Saturday evening is neither an anticipated or vigil Mass. It is SUNDAY MASS. I am fully aware that many places call it ‘Vigil Mass’ but it is not a vigil Mass.

Therefore, I do not see it as logical that you could fulfil the First Saturday Devotion on Sunday. It is a shame that your parish does not have, in effect, a Mass on Saturday.

NEWSFLASH

Apparently, the requirement for the First Saturday Devotions is to** receive **Holy Communion on Saturday, not a requirement to attend Mass on Saturday. I realize that communion is ordinarily received in the context of Mass, but the requirement is to receive on Saturday, thus making the distinction between the liturgy for Saturday or Sunday moot.

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I think I’ll stick with what my priest/spiritual director advised me on the matter. Its suppose to be a devotion, similar to the First Friday devotion. Its suppose to be a sacrifice, not to make the sunday obligation easier.

Keep in mind that the First Saturday devotion is a PRIVATE PERSONAL act so there is no official law about what time of the day “counts” (for the devotion) or what readings are important. Any priest who tells you differently is giving his opinion. As such, this question is technically outside of the scope of the liturgy folder.

OK, rather a dumb question for the OP? Would it not be possible for you to hear Saturday Mass at another parish, or is that not an option? IMHO, all the previous replies you’ve received are totally on the money. Now, back to your original question. "Does attending Saturday Mass for a First Saturday devotion, fulfill your Sunday obligation? That depends. If the Saturday Mass is offered say, at 9:00 AM, your answer is “No”, it will not fulfill your Sunday obligation. OTH, if you attend the 5:00PM “Vigil Mass” on Saturday, that will, and does fulfill your Sunday obligation. Possibly you’re in a situation where you have to chose which Mass to attend. The Sunday Mass (Saturday evening) is your obligation. Not to demean your First Saturday devotion, but the Sunday Mass is your obligation, and thus the one you must fulfill. The first Saturday devotion, while commendable, is still optional.

Masses for the First Saturday devotion are usually in the morning and would not fulfill your Sunday Obligation. So that would be a NO.

If my understanding is correct the conditions required to fulfil this devotion are: 1. confession; 2. Holy Communion (of course, this can be received outside Mass); 3. five decades of the Rosary; 4. fifteen minutes meditation of the mysteries of the Rosary. The devotion has to be fulfilled on Saturday: namely the first Saturday of the month for five consecutive months. The discussion would have to be whether by Saturday we mean the full 24-hours of the calendar day or the 16-hours of the liturgical Saturday (assuming 4 p.m. is the start time for Sunday, which seems to be assumed by most American posters).

Fine with me.

No argument here.

It is a personal devotion, not a sacrifice. Since when is receiving communion a sacrifice? And who said anything about making "the sunday obligation easier?" To think that, by going to the anticipated Sunday Mass at 4:00pm on Saturday, the First Saturday Devotion won’t “work” because that Mass is liturgically Sunday turns the whole thing to superstition.

The requirements for First Saturday Devotions are:

"I promise to assist at the hour of death, with the graces necessary for salvation, all those who, on the first Saturday of five consecutive months,

  1. shall confess,

2)receive Holy Communion,

3)recite five decades of the Rosary, and

4)keep me company for fifteen minutes while meditating on the fifteen mysteries of the Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to Me."

Note that #2 says RECEIVE HOLY COMMUNION, not attend liturgical Saturday Mass.

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I would like to thank everyone who took the time to answer my question. I greatly appreciated your responses.

Also, to clarify, I was not trying to kill two birds with one stone by making my Sunday obligation easier in attending a Saturday evening Mass while fulfilling the First Saturday Devotion: essentially allowing me to attend Mass only once instead of twice over the course of two days. My circumstances were limited and I was wanting to do the right thing.

Thank-you all for your help. I wish you all the best.

Yes. First Saturday Devotion is not an obligation, thus you can fulfill your devotion and Sunday obligation at the same time

Amen! If receiving communion, praying and meditating upon the mysteries of the Rosary and going to confession are sacrifices for you then you’re not doing any of them right.

A sacrifice is offering to God something that is pleasing to Him.

“sac·ri·fice (skr-fs)
n.
1.
a. The act of offering something to a deity in propitiation or homage, especially the ritual slaughter of an animal or a person.
b. A victim offered in this way.
2.
a. Forfeiture of something highly valued for the sake of one considered to have a greater value or claim.
b. Something so forfeited.
3.
a. Relinquishment of something at less than its presumed value.
b. Something so relinquished.
c. A loss so sustained.
4. Baseball A sacrifice bunt or sacrifice fly.”

Prayer doesn’t fit into this description, nor communion, nor confession really.

There is no really no tangible ‘thing’ that is offered to God in the act of prayer, since prayer is simply communication, or a mutual exchange of something intangible.

Nor in the act of a person receiving communion (which on the contrary is something HE offers to US). Nor in confession (again, we go to receive something from Him, certainly the only thing we offer is our sins, which aren’t in the least pleasing or valuable).

Further, there is no ‘victim’ in prayer, or confession, or communion, no ‘relinquishment’ by anyone of anything, no ‘loss’ by anyone of anything either.

Really, I’m at a loss to see how any of the requirements of a First Saturday devotion can be called a ‘sacrifice’ in any sense.

PARTICIPATING IN A SATURDAY MASS AFTER 4PM FULFILLS YOUR SUNDAY OBLIGATION-RECEIVING THE HOLY EUCHARIST WHILE IN A STATE OF GRACE THEN ALSO FULFILLS PART OF THE FIRST SATURDAY DEVOTIONS.

[G THE HOLY EUCHARIST IN A STAQUOTE=LilyM;7309441]"sac·ri·fice (skr-fs)
b. Something so forfeited.
3.
a. Relinquishment of something at less than its presumed value.
b. Something so relinquished.

…There is no really no tangible ‘thing’ that is offered to God in the act of prayer, since prayer is simply communication, or a mutual exchange of something intangible.

Nor in the act of a person receiving communion (which on the contrary is something HE offers to US). Nor in confession (again, we go to receive something from Him, certainly the only thing we offer is our sins, which aren’t in the least pleasing or valuable).
Further, there is no ‘victim’ in prayer, or confession, or communion, no ‘relinquishment’ by anyone of anything, no ‘loss’ by anyone of anything either.

Really, I’m at a loss to see how any of the requirements of a First Saturday devotion can be called a ‘sacrifice’ in any sense.

These ideas are not my own see:
CCC 2099
It is right to offer sacrifice to God as a sign of adoration and gratitude, supplication and communion: "Every action done so as to cling to God in communion of holiness, and thus achieve blessedness, is a true sacrifice."16

CCC 2100
Outward sacrifice, to be genuine, must be the expression of spiritual sacrifice: "The sacrifice acceptable to God is a broken spirit. . . ."17 The prophets of the Old Covenant often denounced sacrifices that were not from the heart or not coupled with love of neighbor.18 Jesus recalls the words of the prophet Hosea: "I desire mercy, and not sacrifice."19 The only perfect sacrifice is the one that Christ offered on the cross as a total offering to the Father’s love and for our salvation.20 By uniting ourselves with his sacrifice we can make our lives a sacrifice to God.

As members of the royal priesthood, we offer many sacrifices-continually in communion with Jesus & esp.
in Communion with the Pascal Sacrifice at the celebration of the Sacrifice of the Mass.
See also:
CCC 784
On entering the People of God through faith and Baptism, one receives a share in this people’s unique, priestly vocation: "Christ the Lord, high priest taken from among men, has made this new people ‘a kingdom of priests to God, his Father.’ The baptized, by regeneration and the anointing of the Holy Spirit, are consecrated to be a spiritual house and a holy priesthood."209

CCC 785
“The holy People of God shares also in Christ’s prophetic office,” above all in the supernatural sense of faith that belongs to the whole People, lay and clergy, when it "unfailingly adheres to this faith . . . once for all delivered to the saints,"210 and when it deepens its understanding and becomes Christ’s witness in the midst of this world.

CCC 786
Finally, the People of God shares in the royal office of Christ. He exercises his kingship by drawing all men to himself through his death and Resurrection.211 Christ, King and Lord of the universe, made himself the servant of all, for he came "not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many."212 For the Christian, “to reign is to serve him,” particularly when serving "the poor and the suffering, in whom the Church recognizes the image of her poor and suffering founder."213 The People of God fulfills its royal dignity by a life in keeping with its vocation to serve with Christ.

      The sign of the cross makes kings of all those reborn in Christ and the anointing of the Holy Spirit consecrates them as priests, so that, apart from the particular service of our ministry, all spiritual and rational Christians are recognized as members of this royal race and sharers in Christ's priestly office. What, indeed, is as royal for a soul as to govern the body in obedience to God? And what is as priestly as to dedicate a pure conscience to the Lord and to offer the spotless offerings of devotion on the altar of the heart?214

Prayers with indulgences attached to them, or that have promises from apparitions associated with them are very beneficial- if they are said with the proper mindset. Devotion is a deep, personal communion with God (who we should love, want to love more, and want to serve because we know that He is all good & all worthy). It’s a friendship (though we must recognize that in this friendship, He is Lord). Prayer and other pious acts are conversations with God- they are offerings of praise, thanksgiving, and petition to Him. They must not be treated as magic words to give us control over the spiritual world. This is wrong- even if we intend the betterment of ourselves or others. God is in charge: He knows us, He loves us, and He isn’t going to ignore us just because we said a prayer for eight consecutive days instead of nine, or because we asked St. Francis for prayers instead of St. Rita. It is good to set a plan for ourselves- novenas and other practices are good for helping us do that- but God isn’t some mindless energy source that responds and does things for whoever said the magic words.

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