Does God still accept animal sacrifices?


#1

While the Jewish system of sacrifice was highly formal and could only be done if a tabernacle or temple was available, there are cases in the Bible where non-Jews appear to give animal sacrifices, such as Abel and Job. It even states that God accepted Abel’s sacrifice, and infamously did not accept his brother Cain’s.

Does God still accept animal sacrifices today, at least in theory? Could a Catholic today choose to perform an animal sacrifice in lieu of a typically performed sacrament? For example, could a Catholic in mortal sin be forgiven of that sin by sacrificing a ram on an altar instead of going to confession? Can you make an animal sacrifice instead of going to Sunday mass? Can one receive indulgences by making animal sacrifices? Would this be permitted for Jewish Christians, but not Gentile Christians?


#2

Offhand I would say no. Since the OT people were into animal worship they were commanded to animal sacrifice as a way to break this hold.


#3

Even for Jews of ancient times, animal sacrifices were never the be-all and end-all of atonement. Prayer was, and still is. Since Jews would not be able to offer animal sacrifices apart from the establishment of the Third Temple, which is prophesied to be completed during the Messianic Age, I doubt Catholics would be allowed to do so, given the theological framework of the Christian religion, in which Jesus is believed to have made the supreme sacrifice in lieu of animal sacrifices.


#4

Does he still accept them? I could be persuaded either way.

Could you do it in lieu of a sacrament? No.


#5

He would probably accept it from someone who meant well and didn’t know any better. However, we are supposed to offer up Christ’s sacrifice for us, which is perfect. Catholics should know better.


#6

Jesus was the perfect sacrifice. Animal sacrifices only atoned for sins, but did not forgive sins. It was an act of penance, but absolution did not occur.

This is why in the Creed, we state very clearly that Jesus “died for the forgiveness of sins”. It was something incredible that had never occurred before.


#7

NO.

Read the Catechism.


#8

[quote="runningdude, post:6, topic:307859"]
Jesus was the perfect sacrifice. Animal sacrifices only atoned for sins, but did not forgive sins. It was an act of penance, but absolution did not occur.

This is why in the Creed, we state very clearly that Jesus "died for the forgiveness of sins". It was something incredible that had never occurred before.

[/quote]

Only prayer could result in the forgiving of sins, even when animal sacrifices failed, as is stated in Isaiah: "Though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow." It is true, however, that no one human, or G-d Himself, had ever 'died for the forgiveness of sins' before Jesus.


#9

G-d?


#10

[quote="R_C, post:7, topic:307859"]
NO.

Read the Catechism.

[/quote]

Amen :thumbsup: Amen :thumbsup: and Amen :thumbsup::


#11

[quote="superamazingman, post:9, topic:307859"]
G-d?

[/quote]

Christians believe Jesus is G-d, so that's why I stated it this way although one may say only the human Jesus died on the cross. (There was a thread about this topic, initiated by me, a while ago.)

Or is it the spelling of G-d that you are questioning? It's a sign of reverence in Judaism and, especially in writing, a precaution in case G-d's name is intentionally or inadvertently deleted.


#12

[quote="meltzerboy, post:11, topic:307859"]
Christians believe Jesus is G-d, so that's why I stated it this way although one may say only the human Jesus died on the cross. (There was a thread about this topic, initiated by me, a while ago.)

Or is it the spelling of G-d that you are questioning? It's a sign of reverence in Judaism and, especially in writing, a precaution in case G-d's name is intentionally or inadvertently deleted.

[/quote]

Ahh. I've never seen a Catholic do that, so I confused, but now that I see you're Jewish, it makes more sense. Carry on. :)


#13

[quote="meltzerboy, post:8, topic:307859"]
Only prayer could result in the forgiving of sins, even when animal sacrifices failed, as is stated in Isaiah: "Though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow." It is true, however, that no one human, or G-d Himself, had ever 'died for the forgiveness of sins' before Jesus.

[/quote]

Am I mistaken here, in that Jews do believe in the forgiveness of sins?


#14

[quote="runningdude, post:13, topic:307859"]
Am I mistaken here, in that Jews do believe in the forgiveness of sins?

[/quote]

They certainly do believe in forgiveness of sins, just as if they had not been committed.


#15

Humans can't place limits on what God can or cannot do.

What we can say is that for Catholics, the only assuredway is through Christ, His Church and His sacraments.

For someone invincibly ignorant in another culture, we cannot say what God's infinite justice and His infinite mercy would allow. But we cannot either say with assurance that He wouldn't allow it.


#16

[quote="meltzerboy, post:14, topic:307859"]
They certainly do believe in forgiveness of sins, just as if they had not been committed.

[/quote]

Ah, I'd missed your first post in this this thread, where you had already addressed my question.


#17

One thing that is** sort of **related is that the Church has condemned doing Old Testament practices with a “just in case” attitude, which is condemned it seems because this represents a lack of trust in the New Covenant in Christ’s blood. I forget what council issued this declaration, though.

But I don’t see the point of offering animal sacrifices - it would feel very wrong to me, mostly for the above reason, and also because such acts are rendered incredibly pointless when placed beside the sacrifice of the mass, which is the sacrifice that God *wills *that we offer Him.


#18

Jesus is the perfect sacrifice - once and for all. DONE. The OT forshadows the NT, and the NT fulfills the OT


#19

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