Does john paul see all religions as equal?


#1

Please help! I’m a Catholic who loves my faith and takes pride in being obedient to our Pope, but I’m having a very hard time understanding something that just came to my attention. I’ve read stuff from Traditional Catholics and anti-Catholics alike that John Paul II is not a true pope because he supposedly endorses all religions as valid. They point to various pictures circulating the Internet that show our pope attending a Native American service, allowing a Hindu priestess to “annoint” him, attending a service where a topless native woman is reading the Word, etc. In addition, they say that John Paul II encouraged religious relativism during his World Peace Day in Assisi (2002) because he told all the representatives of all the religions there (Catholic, Protestant, and even pagan) to go to their respective places to pray. I’m so troubled because I have indeed found the documents for this peace day on the Vatican’s website, and the Pope did indeed call on all religions to “pray” for peace. I firmly believe in being obedient to whoever the Pope is, so please don’t mistake me for a traditional sect. But my heart is confused and hurting right now because it seems like the accusations are true. Can anyone offer me some insight into these photos on the internet and/or the peace day? How should we view these events in light of church teaching? Am I allowed to disagree with the pope’s actions in this peace day? Anyone else know what im talking about?


#2

The short answer to your question is …No.

Please read “Crossing the Threshold of Hope” in which the Holy Father discusses this question and many more.

Peace in Christ


#3

[quote=UKcatholicGuy]Please help! I’m a Catholic who loves my faith and takes pride in being obedient to our Pope, but I’m having a very hard time understanding something that just came to my attention. I’ve read stuff from Traditional Catholics and anti-Catholics alike that John Paul II is not a true pope because he supposedly endorses all religions as valid. They point to various pictures circulating the Internet that show our pope attending a Native American service, allowing a Hindu priestess to “annoint” him, attending a service where a topless native woman is reading the Word, etc. In addition, they say that John Paul II encouraged religious relativism during his World Peace Day in Assisi (2002) because he told all the representatives of all the religions there (Catholic, Protestant, and even pagan) to go to their respective places to pray. I’m so troubled because I have indeed found the documents for this peace day on the Vatican’s website, and the Pope did indeed call on all religions to “pray” for peace. I firmly believe in being obedient to whoever the Pope is, so please don’t mistake me for a traditional sect. But my heart is confused and hurting right now because it seems like the accusations are true. Can anyone offer me some insight into these photos on the internet and/or the peace day? How should we view these events in light of church teaching? Am I allowed to disagree with the pope’s actions in this peace day? Anyone else know what im talking about?
[/quote]

I think JP II sees the human need for seeking of God as something that God uses in whatever Religious form it takes to draw people to Himself. JP II has said time and time again that Salvation is through Christ and because of the Sacrifice of Christ alone.


#4

I agree with Middlebear and you can search the Vatican website to find it here: vatican.va/archive/index.htm

Then I suggest that you dig out your copy of the CCC and dig into it very carefully because it speaks of this very thing as well. All things in their context my friend…all things in their context. :thumbsup:


#5

Here’s your first mistake:

[quote=UKcatholicGuy]I’ve read stuff from Traditional Catholics and anti-Catholics alike that John Paul II is not a true pope because he supposedly endorses all religions as valid.
[/quote]

It shouldn’t need emphasizing that such groups have an annoying tendency to lie about the Pope and/or Catholicism.

And, now, your second mistake, which is a good example of what comes from the first mistake:

[quote=UKcatholicGuy]They point to various pictures circulating the Internet that show our pope…allowing a Hindu priestess to “annoint” him…
[/quote]

The woman in question in that picture is not a Hindu priestess. She is Catholic. She was giving the Pope a traditional Indian form of greeting known as “Aarti,” which has no more religious significance than a handshake in Western culture or giving someone a wreath of flowers as a welcome in Hawaii.

To cure this sort of confusion, follow these two steps.

  1. Stop believing things that anti-Catholics and so-called “Traditional” Catholics say.

  2. Study actual Church doctrine, starting with the Catechism. If you read only 4-5 pages of it a day, you’ll be finished with it in a year.

– Mark L. Chance.


#6

Yes. This pope has been particularly vocal in asserting the human dignity of all persons of all faiths. he has denounced the flawed theory that one is betraying Catholicism if one treats non-Catholics with respect and warmth and kindness.


#7

[quote=katherine2]Yes. This pope has been particularly vocal in asserting the human dignity of all persons of all faiths. he has denounced the flawed theory that one is betraying Catholicism if one treats non-Catholics with respect and warmth and kindness.
[/quote]

As usual, you’ve got it wrong. Neither Pope John Paul II nor Catholicism asserts that all religions are equal. In fact, the opposite is true. The Pope has plainly stated that only Catholic Christianity enjoys the fullness of the truth, and that this truth cannot be compromised.

Admitted this is true does not mean that Catholics are not required to treat all people with “respect and warmth and kindness.”

– Mark L. Chance.


#8

Try reading ‘Nostra Aetate’ one of the documents of Vatican II. It has 3 things going for it. It is (a) short !(b) readable, and © answers your question perfectly!


#9

[quote=katherine2]Yes. This pope has been particularly vocal in asserting the human dignity of all persons of all faiths. he has denounced the flawed theory that one is betraying Catholicism if one treats non-Catholics with respect and warmth and kindness.
[/quote]

No he does not see all religions as equal Katherine:rolleyes: He sees all people made in the image and likeness of God,there is a big difference there.Statements like yours can send people into error.Your statement is saying that Hinduism is as true as Catholocism,that is not correct. Read the previously stated book by the Pope and you will understand better.God Bless


#10

Read Pope John Paul II’s Dignitatis Humanae at:
www.vatican.va/.../ii_vatican_council/ documents/vat-ii_decl_19651207_dignitatis-humanae_en.html

this will give you a solid idea.

**You might also see this picture for more proof.
**
http://www.garykah.org/html/popekiss.jpg

that is indeed the Koran Pope John Paul II is kissing and that is *Patriarch Raphael    I of Iraq* that is standing next to him*.

"The trend since Dignitatis Humanae is to omit the Social Kingship of Christ and deny that the State has any religious obligations at all. This Declaration provoked the laicizing of Catholic States, which is an insult to God and to His Church, reducing the Church to the status of equality with false religions. Since, according to the "new thinking", the state is obliged to give the same legal recognition to false religions as it does to Catholicism, and since demanding a position of primacy to anyone is considered  the height of "injustice" , it follows that there must be a separation of Church and State..

Hence it was that Paul VI and John Paul II induced governments which gave primacy of place to the Catholic religion, to change their Constitutions in order to bring them in line with this new teaching…(i.e.) Spain, Columbia, Brazil…
(Source*: Dr Carol Byrne…Why it is so Difficult to be a Catholic in the Catholic Church Today…Mater Dei…Vol 2, No. 3 Autumn 2004)

Jesse Jr.


#11

[quote=mlchance]As usual, you’ve got it wrong. Neither Pope John Paul II nor Catholicism asserts that all religions are equal. In fact, the opposite is true. The Pope has plainly stated that only Catholic Christianity enjoys the fullness of the truth, and that this truth cannot be compromised.

Admitted this is true does not mean that Catholics are not required to treat all people with “respect and warmth and kindness.”

– Mark L. Chance.
[/quote]

As usual, Mark, you’ve got it wrong. Oddly, not really wrong, but for some reason, you find a need to tell me I was wrong and then go and restate what I said. Again, Pope John Paul has been particularly vocal in asserting the human dignity of all persons of all faiths. He has denounced the flawed theory that one is betraying Catholicism if one treats non-Catholics with respect and warmth and kindness.

I guess the same statement is wrong when I post it but right when you post it. What’s behind that, I can only guess.


#12

The Pope does not assert that all religions are equal. He does however have a profound respect for the beliefs of all.

There is a big difference here.


#13

[quote=Lisa4Catholics]No he does not see all religions as equal Katherine:rolleyes: He sees all people made in the image and likeness of God,there is a big difference there.Statements like yours can send people into error.Your statement is saying that Hinduism is as true as Catholocism,that is not correct. Read the previously stated book by the Pope and you will understand better.God Bless
[/quote]

Where does Katherine state that the Pope sees all relgiions as equal? She seemed to say merely that people are all entitled to being treadted with human dignity, regarldess of their faith.

I am reading Ratzinger’s *Truth and Tolerance *right now, as a summary of “the Catholic view” of world religions. I’m not a big fan of Ratzinger personally, or his writing style (which I think is too verbose and spends too much time defining terms which are self-evidents, but I suppose this comes form the legal habit and practice of not assuming anything you say is understood), but the book has a good summary of “Catholic” beliefs on this topic, and the different theological frameworks that have been sued to address this question.

I am surprised that there are not more books on this topic, as the Pope has spoken much about interfaith dialogues and respect. Maybe it’s a topic more that is written about in journals? I thought that Francis Sullivan’s Salvation Outside the Church would talk about current beliefs in offical Catholicism as an institution, but it is more concerned with tracing the hitroy of the debate, and ends ten years ago.

I know that the Pope has spoken about other faiths having seed of grace in them, but that Catholicism is the most complete and guaranteed route to follow. Personally, I think the idea that people are upset that non-Catholics or even non-Christians may find thier way to heave, illustrate the bad guys in many of Jesus’ parables; the one who were spiteful that others were rewarded too. Like the people who worked all day in the vineyeard were irate that those who worked part of the day, because they only heard the message late, were paid full days services. Or the story about the master who forgives the servant a debt, but the servant does not forgive some one else a much smaller amount that was owed to him.


#14

Please study St. Thomas Aquinas, his life and his works.

St. Thomas constantly quoted arguments from many great intellects, of all faiths, in his writing. That’s no secret, but here is the amazing thing: He always acknowledged what was good in what they said, even as he gently pointed out what was completely wrong.

If you want to identify heresy and ignorance, it is more readily seen in the Catholics who spew that Pope John Paul II is not a real pope.

It is indeed a primitive and immature intellect that asserts that an *entire doctrine *must be wrong if even one piece of it is wrong. For the Holy Father to kiss the Koran is his show of respect for that which is true in that doctrine and nothing more.

Don’t be shaken by histrionic groups. You must trust that this is Christ’s church and that He guides it.


#15

[quote=serendipity]Where does Katherine state that the Pope sees all relgiions as equal? She seemed to say merely that people are all entitled to being treadted with human dignity, regarldess of their faith.

I am reading Ratzinger’s *Truth and Tolerance *right now, as a summary of “the Catholic view” of world religions. I’m not a big fan of Ratzinger personally, or his writing style (which I think is too verbose and spends too much time defining terms which are self-evidents, but I suppose this comes form the legal habit and practice of not assuming anything you say is understood), but the book has a good summary of “Catholic” beliefs on this topic, and the different theological frameworks that have been sued to address this question.

I am surprised that there are not more books on this topic, as the Pope has spoken much about interfaith dialogues and respect. Maybe it’s a topic more that is written about in journals? I thought that Francis Sullivan’s Salvation Outside the Church would talk about current beliefs in offical Catholicism as an institution, but it is more concerned with tracing the hitroy of the debate, and ends ten years ago.

I know that the Pope has spoken about other faiths having seed of grace in them, but that Catholicism is the most complete and guaranteed route to follow. Personally, I think the idea that people are upset that non-Catholics or even non-Christians may find thier way to heave, illustrate the bad guys in many of Jesus’ parables; the one who were spiteful that others were rewarded too. Like the people who worked all day in the vineyeard were irate that those who worked part of the day, because they only heard the message late, were paid full days services. Or the story about the master who forgives the servant a debt, but the servant does not forgive some one else a much smaller amount that was owed to him.
[/quote]

See the name of the thread and Katherines first post.Yes is the first answer.If Katherine did not mean yes to the thread title then I stand corrected.God Bless


#16

[quote=serendipity]Where does Katherine state that the Pope sees all relgiions as equal?
[/quote]

In her initial answer, to the question “Does John Paul see all religions as equal?” she replied -

Yes. This pope has been particularly vocal in asserting the human dignity of all persons of all faiths. he has denounced the flawed theory that one is betraying Catholicism if one treats non-Catholics with respect and warmth and kindness.

The Yes is where she stated that the Pope sees all religions as equal. Perhaps the yes was an error, but she did write it, so cannot now claim

As usual, Mark, you’ve got it wrong.

This is being disingenuous! If she realized, after the fact, that she should have started her reply with “No.”, then she should have willingly admitted her error, instead of accusing Mark. This appears to be a habitual practice with Katherine.


#17

[quote=Joan M]In her initial answer, to the question “Does John Paul see all religions as equal?” she replied -

The Yes … This appears to be a habitual practice with Katherine.
[/quote]

The yes was to the preceding post. This goes exactly to my point. Rather than approach other people with soem presumption of good faith, some want to jump all over them. I answer Mark with a yes; I agree with him, but because of the source he falsely assumes I need to be beat up.

And from you I get similiar accusations.

I think the lesson in all of this is that the dangers of relativism, while real, may well be less of a problem in the world than the dangers of religious bigotry.


#18

Each person born on this earth is created in the image and likeness of God. Now we can all agree that there are millions of people who have lived and died who never heard of God or Jesus and therefore had no chance to accept or reject Him. It is a gift of grace that I was born into a Christian Catholic family and have had the opportunity to know and receive Christ through His Church. Just as I would have a hard time leaving Christianity for Buddhism, Judaism or Islam, I have to imagine it is pretty hard for those who were born and raised within those religions to reject them for Christianity. I believe that what the Holy Father is doing is teaching us that we are all children of God. His Word is written on the hearts of us all. We yearn for Him even when we don’t understand it exactly. Jesus died for all mankind, all who seek will find, all who knock will find the door opened to them. In other words, God is there for those who earnestly seek Him, even if their search never leads to Catholicism, He is there and will welcome them. We don’t understand His ways, but He said that all would bow and know the name of Jesus. Yes, in the Catholic Church one can find the fullest of revealed truth but we don’t know what is not yet revealed. Jesus said that the only way to the Father was through the Son and with His death and resurrection, Jesus opened heaven for all mankind. Only God knows what is truly in our hearts and who truly yearns for Him. John Paul, I think, understands that all men of good will seek Truth and that is what he respects and honors. I have no problem with that, afterall, I am not a Christian because of anything I have done, but through the grace of God.


#19

the Pope did indeed call on all religions to “pray” for peace.

Why is this wrong? Didn’t God accept the prayers of that pagan Cornelius (Acts 10)?


#20

[quote=katherine2]The yes was to the preceding post. This goes exactly to my point. Rather than approach other people with soem presumption of good faith, some want to jump all over them. I answer Mark with a yes; I agree with him, but because of the source he falsely assumes I need to be beat up.

And from you I get similiar accusations.

I think the lesson in all of this is that the dangers of relativism, while real, may well be less of a problem in the world than the dangers of religious bigotry.
[/quote]

Katherine, which “preceding post” were you responding “yes” to? The post immediately preceding your was from Mark. Perhaps you need to be more careful, and not presume that yours will be the next posted? Quoting the response to which you are responding will ensure that people know exactly what you are responding to.

As for “similar accusations” from me - well, we can only read what you have written. And I have read enough of your posts to form an opinion. You come accross as most contentious. Perhaps you don’t mean to, but since we don’t hear you or see you, we can only react to the words you write.


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