Does Mass on TV count?

While I think it is nice to have Mass on TV to watch, can this count for a person’s Sunday obligation? I have a relative who says she gets more out of Mass on TV, she “can’t” make it to Mass in person and thinks this is just fine.

I think since she doesn’t participate, doesn’t receive Holy Communion, etc. it doesn’t count. Am I wrong? Oh, and she seems to find enough energy to make it to BINGO or go to the casino an hour away.

There’s a lot more, but I think she is setting herself up for spiritual self-destruction.

I could sure use some advice…and prayers for her

I don’t think celebrating mass all by yourself is such a good idea. You are part of the Church, not the other way around. The Church is made up of many, and not just one person. If possible it’s much better to go to mass. If you can go, I think you must.

On the other hand, if she is disabled, and there is absolutely no way to go to mass on Sunday, at least she takes the time to pray and say mass. But if this is the case, there is no Sunday obligation. Of course, it doesn’t seem like your relative is this case!

God bless!

Mass on TV does not “count” for one’s Sunday obligation.

But it can be a good thing for those who are unable to reasonably attend Mass and thus have no obligation.

I have to idea if getting to Mass on a Sunday is something she cannot reasonably do but going to the casino is… But I will pray for your relative.

We are obliged to go to Sunday Mass unless sick or there is some genuine impediment. If you relative has some long-term genuine reason to prevent her she needs to consult her pastor for permission. If it’s simply a choice, then she is not fulfilling her Sunday obligation by watching Mass on TV…in any case Mass shouldn’t be treated as an ‘obligation’ but as a privilege.

I will remember your relative in my prayers

Mass on TV never counts.

If someone can’t make it to church on Sunday, if they have good cause, then they don’t have an obligation. If they are stuck in the house, they can watch mass on tv or listen to it on the radio if they wish- but it isn’t a requirement.

BTW , receiving communion isn’t required for those attending mass to fulfill an obligation. The obligation to receive communion is once a year during “eastertide”- from Ash Wednesday to Pentecost.

I always learned that it was from the First Sunday of Lent to Trinity Sunday.

Ask her if watching the Cooking Channel counts the same as eating dinner.

Paul

Catholic TV, and EWTN TV have Mass on their networks constantly. Mass from Notre Dame University Cathedral, even Mass from the Vatican. They even have a prayer for those who are at home watching. “Lord although I cannot receive you physically in the Eucharist, I embrace you as already being there in my heart.” (my emphasis) I respectfully ask this question: If the hard answer is that it does not count, why does the Church not say that the Mass is being presented only for those who are physically disabled, sick, or any other reason, and emphasize that it does not count for Mass observance? I have watched Mass and prayed very attentively and even with tears at times, worshiping Jesus in this sacramental means.
Why does the Church have to be so difficult about everything and not see the compassion of Christ is given to laity as well, in personal relationships, and prayer forms. I suggest this should be refined in the Catechism, and explained more sensitively to the faith life of individuals. I agree that going to Mass is a must, but the legalistic rules about it are borderline Old Testament. The Bishops or Cardinals in Rome have recently had a meeting on the electronic age and uses in the Church. I have not researched any results of this yet. But I am assuming we will be hearing something. Thank you for your kind response.

I looked it up in the Catholic Encyclopedia, and you are absolutely right for Catholics who live in the United States.

The Easter Duty is a universal obligation, but the dates for compliance vary from country to country.

I am not proposing, nor do I replace Sunday Mass with TV Mass. Thank you for the good points on that. The answer to the question is No, it does not count as a satisfaction of the obligation to attend Mass on Sundays and days of Obligation.
OK, let’s ask the question, is watching Mass on TV at any other time, when it is not offered in the community, a good form of prayer and worship. We have daily mass at noon in our city, but if we do not get there, the question is watching it on TV as a form of prayer in the evening, or any time? I added the point, why does the Church not specify, at the beginning of the presentation, the rule for Mass observance, and that the program is for those who are unable to attend mass for a legitimate reason. I think it is OK, but again not to replace any standing rule on Mass attendance. Example, the Chaplet for divine mercy is shown on TV, and even sold on CD for use. :newidea: Christ is exposed in the Eucharist. The Chaplets for Divine Mercy are not said in our parish. Does this negate the worship of Christ in the Eucharist in this manner. If so why does the Church do it in the media? It is very prayerful and reverence is given to God. :gopray2:
(Note: the Vatican is studying the use of media, and internet, and I have not researched any information on this yet. Thanks for your input. God bless. :crossrc:

The Church is not being difficult. The obligation is to physically attend and assist at Mass. The TV Mass does not fulfill the obligation, at this point. However, the Church obviously feels it is beneficial for the faithful to have access to the Mass, even via tv. It is beneficial to turn our minds to Christ. The Mass on tv, then becomes a prayer for those watching. It’s just not the same as being there. Kinda like you can’t do confession via the telephone or internet. You gotta be WITH the priest.

I think we have covered this very well and agree that participation at Mass in person is the best way, that TV is only sacramentally beneficial to the impaired, and disabled, but can be a prayer form if viewed at odd times of the day. If any clergy would like to sum this up it would be appreciated. I suppose watching the Pope at Mass does not count for much? No indulgences count, blessings received by the Pope, etc?
Thank you for your participation, my friends. God bless. Nice discussions.

catholic-bulletin.blogspot.com/2008/07/papal-blessing.html
<<papal blessing
Question from Patricia on 4/11/2008:

When the Pope gives a blessing and you witness this via TV or the internet do you receive the graces of the Papal Blessing? Does it have to be live or can the graces be received from a rebroadcast?

God Bless Pope Benedict XVI!!!

Answer by Colin B. Donovan, STL on 7/1/2008:

The blessing of any priest can be received live via an electronic broadcast (TV, radio, internet). It cannot be received on rebroadcast since there is no priest actually giving the blessing at that time. One could certainly cross oneself anyway, which has an intrinsic value apart from the giving and receiving of a blessing>>

Particular care should therefore be taken to ensure that, in addition to taking place in suitable and well-appointed locations, the celebration respects the liturgical norms in force.

Finally, with regard to the value of taking part in Mass via the communications media, those who hear or view these broadcasts should be aware that, under normal circumstances, they do not fulfil the obligation of attending Mass. Visual images can represent reality, but they do not actually reproduce it.(177) While it is most praiseworthy that the elderly and the sick participate in Sunday Mass through radio and television, the same cannot be said of those who think that such broadcasts dispense them from going to church and sharing in the eucharistic assembly in the living Church.(57. SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS)

I have been told from People from EWTN that the blessing you can receive but it does not fore full your Sunday obligations. the linke for SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS is

vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/apost_exhortations/documents/hf_ben-xvi_exh_20070222_sacramentum-caritatis_en.html

No, never, not at all. This sounds like sheer self-deceit. To fulfil the obligation at all, it is absolutely necessary to be present in body and mind for at least most of the Mass. The obligation can be dispensed for a sufficiently grave cause, and may be presumed to be dispensed for a sufficiently grave cause, such as looking after the sick - watching or attending bingo, (which ought to be denounced as a sin) is not a grave cause. Not to attend, is (taken in itself & apart from any subjective factors such as knowledge, responsibilty, etc.) a mortal sin.

The obligation has a Biblical basis - see Heb.10.25-26. Not to attend, is to say that one is not a member of the Body of Christ. And people wonder why the Church is sick. People like that should be excommunicated - in the early centuries, they* were*. It’s a dreadfully under-used penalty.

All Masses are of their very nature offered for the entire world; for the universe, even - & their fruitfulness can be applied to particular groups. So no Mass is ever purely private: neither priest nor people can speak of “my” Mass; for no such thing exists. The Mass is Christ’s Offering - not ours.

The prayer you quote is a “spiritual communion” - to make one a spiritual communion is good, but is no substitute for the Prayer of the Church gathered together as the Body of Christ, which is what the Mass & the Liturgy of the Hours both are. Our private prayers are not separated from the Prayer of the Church, which is public worship of God; but neither do they replace it. The wrist is not the collar-bone - but they can’t replace one another, & both are needed for bodily health.

I have watched Mass and prayed very attentively and even with tears at times, worshiping Jesus in this sacramental means.

Tears mean nothing - even whores cry. Tears are no evidence of devotion or holiness or piety. The test of our feelings & tears is obedience to God’s Will so far as we know it. If our devotion does not lead us to be more fully subject to God, it is worthless. Feelings are not valueless - but they are a very unsafe guide to our true standing before God.

People are moved to tears by any number of things - Handel’s “Messiah” is not the Mass, but it can be very moving.

Why does the Church have to be so difficult about everything and not see the compassion of Christ is given to laity as well, in personal relationships, and prayer forms.

What have you in mind ?

FWIW, the Church has made the Eucharistic Fast convenient, even barely noticeable. One hour is not a fast. It’s abolished many fasts & days of penance. Mass can be attended on Saturday evening. Outstanding feasts of great importance have been shifted to Sunday. What do people want - Holy Communion in bed ? That is provided too. Day after day that marked the cycle of the Christian Year has vanished, all to make things easy & comfy. No wonder the Church is dying - it’s anorexic.

I suggest this should be refined in the Catechism, and explained more sensitively to the faith life of individuals. I agree that going to Mass is a must, but the legalistic rules about it are borderline Old Testament.

Hebrews 10.25-26 is not in the OT. It’s in the NT. The obligation, and its forms are not to be confused. There are good reasons to attend, & bad ones - but attending remains a need either way.

The Church is compassionate - but not soft. Sometimes, the truly compassionate course is to be as hard as nails in saying “No !” to every plea for a sin, while treating those who make the pleas with compassion & respect. However faulty Christian practice has been or is or will be, that is the distinction that needs making. This can be agonising in practice, but it’s far better than to be indulged; that would merely give our sins even greater power over us. To pander to sin out of a desire to avoid being unkind is anything but kind; to do that, is often a form of the sin of sloth, which is one of the seven deadly sins.

The Bishops or Cardinals in Rome have recently had a meeting on the electronic age and uses in the Church. I have not researched any results of this yet. But I am assuming we will be hearing something. Thank you for your kind response.

I disagree completely that a TV Mass is Sacramentally beneficial for anyone. In order to receive a Sacrament, you have to be there. Physically. Not emotionally, spiritually, or in any other way. Taken to it’s logical extreme, one could receive Confession or Matrimony over closed circuit TV.

Unless you are one of the very few people that the Lord has given the gift of bilocation to, you can’t watch the Mass on TV at home and participate in it when it is taking place somewhere else.

Mass on TV has other purposes, too. EWTN is a Catholic TV channel. The Mass is how we worship Jesus in the Church. It only makes sense that Mass should be on TV to show the world what we do, and to preach the Gospel in that way. It’s a great way for anyone who isn’t Catholic to learn about the Catholic Mass. Plus we can watch it to keep our minds on God.

Requiring attendance as Mass is not legalistic. Most of us wouldn’t think twice about attending a meeting in person that our boss orders us to, so why do we (and I include myself in this) sometimes complain so much about having to go to Mass?

=His little1;4920305]While I think it is nice to have Mass on TV to watch, can this count for a person’s Sunday obligation? I have a relative who says she gets more out of Mass on TV, she “can’t” make it to Mass in person and thinks this is just fine.

I think since she doesn’t participate, doesn’t receive Holy Communion, etc. it doesn’t count. Am I wrong? Oh, and she seems to find enough energy to make it to BINGO or go to the casino an hour away.

There’s a lot more, but I think she is setting herself up for spiritual self-destruction.

I could sure use some advice…and prayers for her

While one can easily understand “getting more out of EWTN’s Mass” than one may get in our local parish, that alone does not excuse one from **obligatory attendance **and participation in a “Live Mass”.

Only in EXTREME circumstances, even with great difficulty and inconvience, may one be excused from Sunday and Holyday Mass.

Sickness, homebound, and legitment reasons (as defined by the RCC, not oneself) could excuse ones formal obligation. It is always best to discusss ones situtation with you’re priest before you commit to this action.

Daily Mass for the homebound is the primary reason for the TV MASS.

Love and prayer’s.

Properly speaking, it’s the pastor’s call whether or not to dispense one from the sunday obligation. Many simply set blanket conditions, like “If your child is running a fever, stay home with them,” but properly, one should be dispensed by the pastor.

My pastor knows when I’m sick, because once I realize I’m either unfit to drive or am contagious, I call him.

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