Does Matthew 12:31-32 mean that some sins are unforgivable?


#1

31 And so I tell you, every kind of sin and slander can be forgiven, but blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven. 32 Anyone who speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven, but anyone who speaks against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven, either in this age or in the age to come.


#2

As I describe it, the only sin that can’t be forgiven is the one you won’t let be forgiven.


#3

[quote="Razanir, post:2, topic:334515"]
As I describe it, the only sin that can't be forgiven is the one you won't let be forgiven.

[/quote]

What on earth do you mean by that? It's clear what the chapter and verse means.

I don't understand how you construed what you said from the said chapter and verse?


#4

[quote="123Strontium, post:3, topic:334515"]
What on earth do you mean by that?

[/quote]

He means that "blasphemy against the Holy Spirit" has traditionally meant that one who is unrepentant cannot be forgiven, because God doesn't force His forgiveness or grace upon us.


#5

[quote="123Strontium, post:3, topic:334515"]
What on earth do you mean by that? It's clear what the chapter and verse means.

I don't understand how you construed what you said from the said chapter and verse?

[/quote]

The unforgivable sin is final impenitence. It's not letting a sin be forgiven.

What it means is that God will forgive any sin (in this life). Alternatively put, any sin can be forgiven if you actually ask God for forgiveness. The inverse of this is "The only sin that can't be forgiven is the one you don't ask to be forgiven for." I just word it the way I do because it's shorter, catchier and more memorable that way :shrug:


#6

I take no issue with what you’re saying, but could you point me to sources that flesh out this interpretation.


#7

[quote="BigRo, post:6, topic:334515"]
I take no issue with what you're saying, but could you point me to sources that flesh out this interpretation.

[/quote]

The paragraph from the Catechism I posted? CCC 1864 describes in formal language what I've been saying. But seriously, though, historically "blasphemy of the Holy Spirit" has referred to refusing God's saving grace.


#8

[quote="Razanir, post:7, topic:334515"]
The paragraph from the Catechism I posted? CCC 1864 describes in formal language what I've been saying. But seriously, though, historically "blasphemy of the Holy Spirit" has referred to refusing God's saving grace.

[/quote]

Yes I've read the CCC smartypants ;)

I just thought you might know about some commentary or scholarly work that takes up the subject.


#9

In simple terms it means a person in a state of mortal sin who refuses to repent before they die and consequently they go to Hell.


#10

[quote="BigRo, post:6, topic:334515"]
I take no issue with what you're saying, but could you point me to sources that flesh out this interpretation.

[/quote]

You can actually see this through out the bible. A lot of things are not spelled out for us. Christ even said that the Holy Spirit will teach us all in matters of sin. Meaning various enlightenments that will answer our confusions.

If we take a look at the example of Adam and Eve we can see how God's mercy works and how our defiance or rejection of Gods grace works.

Most people see the crucial sin of Adam and Eve as the disobedience. Many of us who are finger pointing, hypocritical, self righteous, pharisees will stop at that and will of course accuse Adam and Eve and insinuate they would have never fallen into temptation.

Anyway, when we look at this crucial interaction between God and Adam, we should see that God opened His heart of mercy from the beginning. How did He do this? He did not condemn Adam IMMEDIATELY. In fact, He called out to Adam. He asked....why are you hiding from Me? We can parallel the story to the father of the prodigal son who was looking out on the horizon for his son, who was still quite a distance away when he saw him. Which, of course implies he scanned the horizon daily for his son to return....of his son's own free will.

Well, God called to Adam. Searching for him. When Adam came out of his hiding, and he was ashamed and covering his nakedness, God again, shows His mercy. He asked Adam. Who told you you were naked? Did you eat of the forbidden fruit? God knew he did. So, why is God asking Adam this question. To be a cruel hypocrite. To be a ruthless king? To be sarcastic and belittling? No. To convict Adam of his disobedience. If the disobedience was the only factor, then God would not have "searched for him" or called out to him or asked him anything. If it was ONLY ABOUT DISOBEDIENCE, then God would have thrown him out of Eden with out questioning him.

You see, God will lead us to the river. He will present the cup to us. However, He will not drink it for us. He will not confess our sins for us.

What did Adam say? He said...."The woman YOU PUT HERE, tricked me."

You catch that? Adam, blamed God for his sin. He held God in contempt for his sin. Eve did something similar. She said, "The serpent tricked me." The classic the devil made me do it response. Again, that also puts God in contempt, for God allowed the temptation to happen. It was these two responses that incurred Gods wrath and judgement. Not the disobedience itself.

What we do not know is what God would have done if Adam and Eve both acknowledged their sins. If they both begged for Gods mercy. Well, as Christians and the lengths God went for us to be with Him (watch the Passion if some how you are confused by what God wants for us) we ought to know how He would have treated them if they made a contrite response. We also saw how the Lord treated everyone that came to Him with a humble and contrite heart. Does it not say in psalms that God does not spurn such a heart? Remember the thief that acknowledged his sins as opposed to the other whose heart was hardened to the grace?

We can see this through out the bible. If that verse has caused you fear as it did to me for a long time, then thank the Lord that it did. It should. However, it should not lead to just fear, but also pure hope.


#11

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