Does the Glorified Body of Jesus have flesh and blood? (1 Cor. 15:50)


#1

*"Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot possess the kingdom of God: neither shall corruption possess incorruption." (1 Cor. 15:50)
*

As a Catholic Christian I believe that Jesus does have Flesh and Blood in Heaven because of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

Yet this verse is often used to deny this. I even heard a Protestant teach that His Glorified Body has flesh and bone (but no blood).

Can any of you shed any light on this matter?

Thanks. :)

Have a Blessed and Holy Christmas! Christ is Born!

A. H. J. E.
After the Heart of Jesus Evangelist


#2

Of course He does. After rising from the dead, He ate with His disciples, and He knew that Thomas doubted, so He appeared to him and invited him to examine His wounds. The Bible tells us He is alive forever and ever.

bible.cc/luke/24-39.htm

bible.cc/1_corinthians/15-4.htm

Peace,
Ed


#3

Haydock Catholic Commentary

1Co 15:35-50 How do the dead rise again? He now answers the objections these new teachers made against the resurrection. St. John Chrysostom reduces them to these two questions: how is it possible for them to rise? and in what manner, or with what qualities, will they rise? To shew the possibility, he brings the example of a grain of wheat, or of any seeds, which must be corrupted, and die as it were in the ground, and then is quite changed, comes up with a blade, a stalk, and an ear quite different from what it was when sown, and yet comes to be wheat again, or to be a tree that produces the same kind of fruit: so God can raise our bodies as he pleaseth. He also tells them that there are very different bodies, terrestrial, and celestial, some more, some less glorious, differing in beauty and other qualities, as God pleaseth. As the sun is brighter than the moon, and as one star is brighter than another, so shall it be at the general resurrection. But all the bodies of the elect shall be happily changed to a state of incorruption. (ver. 42.) Here the bodies even of the just are subject to corruption, to decay, liable to death, but they shall then rise to a state of incorruptibility and immortality: And so he answers the second question, that here every one's body is a weak, sensual, animal body, clogged with many imperfections, like that of Adam after he had sinned; but at the resurrection, the bodies of the saints shall be spiritual bodies, blessed with all the perfections and qualities of a glorified body, like to that of Christ after he was risen. --- St. Paul also, comparing the first man (Adam) with Christ, whom he calls the second or the last Adam, (ver. 45) says that the first Adam was made a living soul, (i.e. a living animal, or a living creature, with a life and a body that required to be supported with corporal food) but that Christ was made a quickening Spirit: he means, that though he had a true mortal body by his nativity of his Virgin Mother, yet that by his resurrection he had a glorified body, immortal, that needed no corporal food, and that he would also give such spiritual and immortal bodies to those whom he should make partakers of his glory. --- But not first that which is spiritual, &c. (ver. 46) that is, both in Adam and in us, and even in Christ, the body was first mortal, which should afterwards be made spiritual and immortal by a happy resurrection. --- The first Adam (ver. 47) was of the earth, earthly, made of clay, and with such a body as could die, but the second man (Christ) was from heaven, heavenly: not that he took a body from heaven, as some ancient heretics pretended, but he was heavenly not only because he was the Son of God, but in this place he seems to be called heavenly even as to his body, after his resurrection, his body being then become spiritual and immortal. --- Such as is the earthly man, &c. (ver. 48) that is, as the first man, Adam, was earthly by his earthly and mortal body, so were we and all his posterity earthly; but such as the heavenly man, Christ, was heavenly, and rose with a heavenly and immortal body; so shall all those be heavenly, to whom he shall give a spiritual, a heavenly, and an immortal body at their happy resurrection. --- Therefore, (ver. 49) as we have borne the image of the earthly man, (that is, have been made mortal, and also by sin subject to the corrupt inclinations of this mortal body) so let us bear also the image of the heavenly one, by a new life imitating Christ, by which means we shall be glorified with him, both as to soul and body. --- Now this I say, and admonish you, brethren, (ver. 50) that flesh and blood cannot possess the kingdom of God; i.e. those that lead a sensual and carnal life, nor the corruption of sin, deserve the state of incorruption in glory. (Witham)

Hopes this helps. At least it subscribes me to thread for future discussion. :)


#4

[quote="AHJE, post:1, topic:309575"]
*"Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot possess the kingdom of God: neither shall corruption possess incorruption." (1 Cor. 15:50)
*

As a Catholic Christian I believe that Jesus does have Flesh and Blood in Heaven because of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

Yet this verse is often used to deny this. I even heard a Protestant teach that His Glorified Body has flesh and bone (but no blood).

Can any of you shed any light on this matter?

Thanks. :)

Have a Blessed and Holy Christmas! Christ is Born!

A. H. J. E.
After the Heart of Jesus Evangelist

[/quote]

The passage is quite true and quire literal. If you read "On the Incarnation of the Word" by St. Athanasius, you will understand that the teaching is that Jesus needed to become man so that divnity may be communed with mortal flesh. Flesh alone (flesh and blood) cannot possess the Kingdom. But in the hypostatic union of flesh and dvinity in Christ, He has brought divinity within our reach. That is why we receive Him through Communion so that in our communion with Him we are brought as partakers of divinity and thus attain the Kingdom.

Christ isn't just flesh and blood, he is also divine. Flesh and blood alone cannot accomplish it.


#5

I disagree with the commentary. It seems to insinuate that anything physical/carnal is evil.


#6

[quote="ConstantineTG, post:5, topic:309575"]
I disagree with the commentary. It seems to insinuate that anything physical/carnal is evil.

[/quote]

I don't read the commentary to insinuate that physical/carnal is evil. That idea sounds more gnostic to me, and isn't consistent with Fr. Witham's general manner of commentary. Here, he is referring to the concupiscence of the flesh. St. Thomas Aquinas's commentary follows the same vein of thought, in my opinion:

  1. – And this is what he says: I tell you this, brethren; as if to say: unless you live, namely, the life of grace, you cannot attain to the kingdom of God, i.e., to the life of glory, because flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God. What we must not think, as some heretics say, is that flesh and blood will not rise according to substance, but rather that the whole body will be changed into spirit or into air. This is heretical and false. For the Apostle says that our body will be conformed to his body of radiance. Therefore, since Christ after his resurrection, has body and blood, as it says in Luke (24:39): “See my hands and my feet, that it is I myself; handle me, and see; for a spirit has not flesh and bones as you see that I have,” it is certain that we too will have flesh and blood in the resurrection.

  2. – We must not think that by flesh and blood, he means that the substance of the flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God, but rather flesh and blood, i.e., those devoting themselves to flesh and blood, namely, men given to vices and lusts, cannot inherit the kingdom of God. And thus is flesh understood, i.e., a man living by the flesh: “But you are not in the flesh, you are in the Spirit, if in fact the Spirit of God dwells in you” (Rom. 8:9) Or: flesh and blood, i.e., the works of flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God, which is against the Jews and Muslims who imagine that after the resurrection they will possess for themselves wives and rivers of honey and milk. Or: flesh and blood, i.e., the corruption of flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God; that is, after the resurrection, the body will not be subject to the corruption of flesh and blood, as it is of the man who lives [now]. Therefore and accordingly, he adds, nor does the corruptible inherit incorruption, i.e., nor can the corruption of mortality, which is expressed here by the term “flesh,” inherit incorruption, i.e., the incorruptible kingdom of God, because we will rise in glory: “Because the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to decay and obtain the glorious liberty of the children of God” (Rom. 8:21).


#7

Luke 24:39 -- Behold my hands and my feet, that it is I myself: handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see me have.

Blood is not mentioned, and the reason for that, I was taught as a Protestant, is found here:

Heb 9:11-15 -- But Christ came as High Priest of the good things to come, with the greater and more perfect tabernacle not made with hands, that is, not of this creation, not with the blood of goats and calves, but with His own blood He entered the Most Holy Place once for all, having obtained eternal redemption. For if the blood of bulls and goats and the ashes of a heifer, sprinkling the unclean, sanctifies for the purifying of the flesh, how much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered Himself without spot to God, cleanse your conscience from dead works to serve the living God?

(. . . not to mention the fact that we drink His Blood at every Mass)


#8

Thanks you guys, ... some good stuff. :)

Also I have considered that Jesus (as the Risen Lord) ate fish right in front of the Holy Apostles. How did he digest that fish, ... don't you need blood for that?

Just wondering, ... :)

Praised be the Baby Jesus, Born of Mary!


#9

He would have lost most of His blood when He died; but it would regenerate once His life was restored. Remember, this was at least in part, the same body He died in.

ICXC NIKA


#10

[quote="AHJE, post:1, topic:309575"]
*"Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot possess the kingdom of God: neither shall corruption possess incorruption." (1 Cor. 15:50)
*

As a Catholic Christian I believe that Jesus does have Flesh and Blood in Heaven because of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

Yet this verse is often used to deny this. I even heard a Protestant teach that His Glorified Body has flesh and bone (but no blood).

Can any of you shed any light on this matter?

Thanks. :)

Have a Blessed and Holy Christmas! Christ is Born!

A. H. J. E.
After the Heart of Jesus Evangelist

[/quote]

" This is my Body, this is my Blood. " What else can one say. Either Christ was telling the truth and He is God, or he is telling a lie and he is a devil. Your friend has to make a choice. The words are absolutely clear. " This Body " and " this Blood " constitute Christ's Glorified body and blood. That is all there is to say. :thumbsup:


#11

I'm new to Catholic.com. This question is closely related to the question I have and I'm hoping that some of you can shed some light on this for me.

First of all...I'm a Southern Baptist but have been a Closet Catholic since a teenager. In Sunday School this morning, the topic of Christ's incarnation came up. I fully believe that Jesus is 100% God and 100% man. I also fully believe that He died and was bodily resurrected on the third day with the same body He had before but was glorified, i.e. able to walk through walls, etc.

I have always believed the Jesus will have His resurrected and glorified body throughout eternity; however, my Sunday School teacher and wife don't believe that He will. I guess they think that having a body would limit Him throughout eternity.

I would love to hear what other believe about this. Do you believe Christ will be forever 100% God and 100% Man living in His resurrected and glorified body throughout eternity?
Do you know what the Church teaches about this?

Any thoughts are greatly appreciated!

Thank you!

Hershel Martin
Overland Park, KS


#12

HI AHJE,

After His resurrection, Jesus was at pains to show that his body was real.

... why do you harbor doubts in your hearts? See my hands and my feet; it is really I. Touch me and realize that a spirit has neither flesh nor bones as you can see that I have... Do you have something to eat? They offered Him a piece of grilled fish. He took it and ate it in front of them.

Luke 24, 36-43)

There is nothing in scripture or tradition that would lead us to think that his resurrected state might change. It is a fundamental tenet of our faith that the person Jesus is both God and man. For eternity.

Verbum,


#13

[quote="htm9779, post:11, topic:309575"]
I'm new to Catholic.com. This question is closely related to the question I have and I'm hoping that some of you can shed some light on this for me.

First of all...I'm a Southern Baptist but have been a Closet Catholic since a teenager. In Sunday School this morning, the topic of Christ's incarnation came up. I fully believe that Jesus is 100% God and 100% man. I also fully believe that He died and was bodily resurrected on the third day with the same body He had before but was glorified, i.e. able to walk through walls, etc.

I have always believed the Jesus will have His resurrected and glorified body throughout eternity; however, my Sunday School teacher and wife don't believe that He will. I guess they think that having a body would limit Him throughout eternity.

I would love to hear what other believe about this. Do you believe Christ will be forever 100% God and 100% Man living in His resurrected and glorified body throughout eternity?
Do you know what the Church teaches about this?

Any thoughts are greatly appreciated!

Thank you!

Hershel Martin
Overland Park, KS

[/quote]

Hey Hershel, I'm just a stones throw away but I won't say where. But I went to kindergarden at the old O.P. grade school in 1944 !! Your Sunday School teachers are wrong. Check out the Catechism of the Catholic Church here or go down to Trinity House in the Windmill Square just west of Metclaf and South of 97th street in that first block of stores and buy one.

vatican.va/archive/ENG0015/_INDEX.HTM

And what are you doing in the closet young man? The water is just right, jump right in. :)

Just go knock on Ol' Father Cullen's door ( Queen of the Holy Rosary ) and tell him you are thinking about becoming Catholic. :thumbsup:


#14

Didn't he ask for something to eat when he met the Apostles after His resurrection?


#15

[quote="Sarcelle, post:14, topic:309575"]
Didn't he ask for something to eat when he met the Apostles after His resurrection?

[/quote]

Yes, but remember that he walked right through a locked door.


#16

So HE was a body; just not a standard-issue human body as we understand them.

I imagine that was clear from the start.

ICXC NIKA


#17

[quote="GEddie, post:16, topic:309575"]
So HE was a body; just not a standard-issue human body as we understand them.

I imagine that was clear from the start.

ICXC NIKA

[/quote]

Yes, He had a glorified body.

The Apostles also thought He was a ghost and then He said ghosts did not have flesh or bones.


#18

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