Does the Hypostatic Union imply the Real Presence?


#1

I’m a new convert to Catholicism, and am new to this forum, so I apologize if my question is improperly posed or is too long.

The hypostatic union, as I understand it, states that Jesus is fully human and fully divine in such a way as to be “without confusion or separation.” Thus, Jesus has, forever, a physical body (glorified, yes, but also physical).

He also said things like, “I am with you always” and “I am in you and you in Me.” The question is, exactly how is Jesus “with us” and “in us”? If He is with us only spiritually, then we have violated the hypostatic union by separating His physical body from his spiritual body. If we say that He meant only that His Holy Spirit is with us, then we violate the doctrine of the Trinity which states that Jesus and the Holy Spirit are not the same person, though they are both fully God. The only answer to this difficutly seems to be the doctrine of the Real Presence, which provides for Jesus to be with us always, both physically and spiritually, and indeed to be in us, as we adore and partake of Him in the Blessed Sacrament. Any comments? Has anyone ever heard of this line of reasoning?


#2

[quote=Paul Barry]I’m a new convert to Catholicism, and am new to this forum, so I apologize if my question is improperly posed or is too long.

The hypostatic union, as I understand it, states that Jesus is fully human and fully divine in such a way as to be “without confusion or separation.” Thus, Jesus has, forever, a physical body (glorified, yes, but also physical).

He also said things like, “I am with you always” and “I am in you and you in Me.” The question is, exactly how is Jesus “with us” and “in us”? If He is with us only spiritually, then we have violated the hypostatic union by separating His physical body from his spiritual body. If we say that He meant only that His Holy Spirit is with us, then we violate the doctrine of the Trinity which states that Jesus and the Holy Spirit are not the same person, though they are both fully God. The only answer to this difficutly seems to be the doctrine of the Real Presence, which provides for Jesus to be with us always, both physically and spiritually, and indeed to be in us, as we adore and partake of Him in the Blessed Sacrament. Any comments? Has anyone ever heard of this line of reasoning?
[/quote]

Hi Paul,

Interesting. Excuse me if I slaughter this explanation, but since the Trinity exists in one nature, they do not operate in isolation, however we still appropriate certain actions to each Person according to the type of act. So when the help of the Holy Spirit comes to the church, it really cannot be said that that help does not also come from the Father and the Son. (Not to negate what you’re saying)

Hopefully someone can expound on this or find another link that can more clearly flesh out what I’m trying to say.

ewtn.com/faith/teachings/GODA22A.HTM


#3

i’ve been taught that it is thru Holy Mother Church and especially thru the Mystery of the Eucharist that J fulfills His promise to remain with us always.
you seem to have it understood as well as it can be.

Christ is risen!!!


#4

The hypostatic union refers to the union of the divine nature and the human nature in the Second Person of the Trinity. The Son, God’s Word, became incarnate, taking on a human nature (but not a human Person–he remains the 2nd Person of the Trinity.)

I’m not sure if I understand why you see the real presence as a necessary outcome of the hypostatic union. But your insight does seem true, that it provides a way for Jesus to be present with us always, both spiritually and physically. We do receive Jesus both spiritually and physically through the Eucharist.

In Baptism we receive the indwelling of the Holy Trinity in our souls; God abides with us making his very life present in our souls.

(It might be noted that even the unbaptized–and all of creation–have a necessary connection to God simply by the fact of their existence, since it is God who continuously holds them in existence. But only in Baptism and the other sacraments do we receive the indwelling of God’s life.)

It is also true that Jesus’ Real Presence in the Eucharist is the same presence whenever and wherever we receive him. We do not receive a different Jesus at each communion. That fact means that his actual presence draws together the various facets of our lives–past and present and future. Because the eucharist I receive today is really the same eucharist I received at first communion and that I will receive on my deathbed. It is an integrating sacrament.


#5

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