Dogs of God?


#1

Is this another attack on Christianity or even more specific the Catholic Church? Or is it a historical accurate fair unbiased book on the history?


#2

[quote=John Paul III]Is this another attack on Christianity or even more specific the Catholic Church? Or is it a historical accurate fair unbiased book on the history?
[/quote]

How many people in this forum do you reckon has heard of the book never mind read it?


#3

Yes, more information needed.


#4

[quote=thistle]How many people in this forum do you reckon has heard of the book never mind read it?
[/quote]

I would think anyone who has gone into a bookstore lately, the book has been on endcaps and tables showing off new books.


#5

Well, there’s 2 books by that title that I found at amazon.

  1. **Dogs of God : Columbus, the Inquisition, and the Defeat of the Moors, by James Reston

** 2) **Dogs of God, by Pickney Benedict

**I’m guessing it’s the first one, the second one is more of a thriller type novel. The first one is about religion and history.

The “Dogs of God” are King Ferdinand’s Dominican advisors.


#6

Way back in the Middle Ages, the Dominicans were called the dogs of God (Domini Cannes). Is it about the Dominicans?


#7

[quote=John Paul III]I would think anyone who has gone into a bookstore lately, the book has been on endcaps and tables showing off new books.
[/quote]

Please, it is not fair to initiate a topic then be presumptuous about it being familiar to everyone else. I have limited time and funds. I do not frequent bookstores. I’d like to be let in.


#8

[quote=Reformed Rob]Well, there’s 2 books by that title that I found at amazon.

  1. Dogs of God : Columbus, the Inquisition, and the Defeat of the Moors, by James Reston

  2. Dogs of God, by Pickney Benedict

I’m guessing it’s the first one, the second one is more of a thriller type novel. The first one is about religion and history.

The “Dogs of God” are King Ferdinand’s Dominican advisors.
[/quote]

Yes I am talking about the 1st book noted


#9

[quote=coyote]Please, it is not fair to initiate a topic then be presumptuous about it being familiar to everyone else. I have limited time and funds. I do not frequent bookstores. I’d like to be let in.
[/quote]

Sorry if you felt left out, I was asking the question seeking more information on the book from anyone who has read it, or is familiar with it, from the cover I felt it was anti catholic, but was not sure.


#10

How did the cover seem anti-catholic? Was it the same one seen on the Amazon website?


#11

[quote=Ghosty]How did the cover seem anti-catholic? Was it the same one seen on the Amazon website?
[/quote]

Well the title Dogs of God for one and their is a picture of a Pope, I was seeking to find out if the history book was written with a biased anti catholic outlook on Church History. Or if it were written from unbiased facts of those times.


#12

Ahhh, in that case perhaps I can help you out. Though I don’t know anything about the book in question, I do know something about the phrase “Dog of God”. It’s actually a rather pious, if humorous, play on words.

The Order of Friars-Preachers, started by St. Dominic, were called Dominicans. In Latin, “Lord” is Domini, and dog is “canes”.

Dominicans, Dominicanes, Hounds of God :smiley:

This term was also played up by the fact that the Dominicans were founded as a non-monastic Order of Monks who were trained to hunt down and root out heresy (hence their position in the Inquisition). St. Dominic was also Spanish, adding to theme of the book in question, I’d imagine.

It’s a pun, but a very fitting pun, and even a pious pun, as it really does relate to their particular devotion and aim as an Order.

Peace and God bless!


#13

Here are some images of St. Dominic. You’ll notice the dog and the torch, which are the symbols of the Order:

dominicos.org/hrosary/english/history/domsymbols.htm

In the lower right you’ll see the dog with the torch touching the globe, as the fire of St. Dominic set the world a light.

svfparish.org/Images/tour/saints01.htm

This is stained glass, and under Dominic is the dog with the torch again.

I attend a Dominican church, and that little dog is all over the place :slight_smile:


#14

See, now I was able to receive an education through this thread. Very interesting. I have learned something.


#15

After all of that, I forgot to mention that the “dog with the torch” was actually a vision that St. Dominic’s mother had about her son. It’s said she had a vision of a dog lighting up the world with the torch in its mouth.

The fact that St. Dominic founded an Order of passionate preacher’s whose purpose was to root out heresy, and that their name in Latin was very close to the term “God’s Dogs”, makes for a beautiful “coincidence”.

Peace and God bless!


#16

One more note:

G.K. Chesterton wrote of St. Thomas Aquinas, the most famous Dominican after St. Dominic, and likely even more famous:

But this notion of pursuing he certainly had, and it was the beginning of a thousand mistakes and misunderstandings that pursuing is called in Latin Persecution. Nobody had less than he had of what is commonly called the temper of a persecutor; but he had the quality which in desperate times is often driven to persecute; and that is simply the sense that everything lives somewhere, and nothing dies unless it dies in its own home. That he did sometimes, in this sense, urge in dreams the shadowy chase even in broad daylight, is quite true. But he was an active dreamer, if not what is commonly called a man of action; and in that chase he was truly to be counted among the domini canes; and surely the mightiest and most magnanimous of the Hounds of Heaven.

Domini Canes, Hounds of God, is a noble and honorable title. In fact, I think I’m getting ideas for a new tattoo :smiley:

Peace and God bless!


#17

[quote=Ghosty]One more note:

G.K. Chesterton wrote of St. Thomas Aquinas, the most famous Dominican after St. Dominic, and likely even more famous:
Domini Canes, Hounds of God, is a noble and honorable title. In fact, I think I’m getting ideas for a new tattoo
Peace and God bless!
[/quote]

Of course, there is also the poem, **The Hound of Heaven **by Francis Thompson:

I fled Him, down the nights and down the days;
I fled Him, down the arches of the years;
I fled Him, down the labyrinthine ways
Of my own mind; and in the mist of tears
I hid from Him, and under running laughter;
Up vistaed hopes I sped;
And shot, precipitated,
Adown Titanic glooms of chasmed fears,
From those strong Feet that followed, followed after.

Link to entire poem: jloughnan.tripod.com/hound.htm


#18

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