Don't Eat Raw Cookie Dough, FDA Warns After E. Coli Outbreak


#1

ABC News:

Don’t Eat Raw Cookie Dough, FDA Warns After E. Coli Outbreak

Cookie dough may be tempting to taste before it’s been baked, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning people to resist that temptation due to concerns that the dough could be contaminated with E. coli bacteria.
Dozens of people have been sickened due to an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O121 linked to flour, prompting the FDA to issue a warning on Wednesday to avoid eating raw cookie dough or batter – whether it’s for bread, cookies, pizza or tortillas.

The E. coli outbreak in at least 20 states, likely caused by flour, was reported earlier this month, by the CDC and led General Mills to voluntarily recall 10 million pounds of flour.
The products were sold under the names Gold Medal, Signature Kitchen’s, and Gold Medal Wondra. At least 38 people have been infected with E. coli in the flour-related outbreak, including 10 people who were hospitalized, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Wow! Thirty-eight infected and ten hospitalized nationwide!! I think I’ll keep eating cookie dough and let the grandkids do the same when they visit.


#2

Not to treat it lightly, but I just can’t resist.

The USDA is wrong. Eating raw dough won’t give you e coli, it will give you “worms”. Or at least that’s what my grandmother used to caution. :rotfl: I wonder when USDA will discover that swallowing your chewing gum will make your insides stick together. :shrug:


#3

It has raw eggs when made from scratch. I will not eat raw cookie dough. Of course, this may be referring to the already made stuff you take and bake.


#4

mmmmmmm raw cookie dough. :love:
not as interested after it’s baked.


#5

Look out that you don’t get worms from eating it! :eek: Or so my grandmother would say. But she didn’t limit it to cookie dough. ANY kind of raw dough, she pronounced, would give a kid worms, much like going outside in winter without a hat would give a person a cold or even the flu if it’s cold enough. :slight_smile:


#6

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:


#7

This has nothing to do with the folk wisdom, that we all ignore, to not eat raw cookie dough. The flour was tainted.

Dozens of people have been sickened due to an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O121 linked to flour, prompting the FDA to issue a warning on Wednesday to avoid eating raw cookie dough or batter – whether it’s for bread, cookies, pizza or tortillas.

The products were sold under the names Gold Medal, Signature Kitchen’s, and Gold Medal Wondra. At least 38 people have been infected with E. coli in the flour-related outbreak, including 10 people who were hospitalized, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Flour produced at a General Mills facility in Kansas City, Missouri, is believed to be the source of the outbreak, CDC officials said earlier this month. General Mills said that the FDA has confirmed one sample from its recalled flour tested positive for E. coli O121.


#8

I remember an episode of Emergency where a guy ate a bunch of raw dough and it rose in his stomach. That scared me a bit as a kid. I still ate raw dough but I was a little more scared while I did it.


#9

I actually tend to eat raw cookie dough at times.


#10

It was the flour (which was tainted) not the raw eggs. Prepared dough uses pasteurized eggs anyway. Eggs may have salmonella, not e. coli.

I myself eat raw egg yolk, I have reviewed the likelyhood of a problem and I am okay with it.


#11

So the threat of salmanilla from the raw eggs isn’t enough concern,now it is ecoli from the flour,good grief!:eek:


#12

Hopefully our nation can bring itself to listen if a third of our meat supply is someday tainted, since we have all been made deaf from hype about lower risk things.


#13

Threat of serious, possibly fatal food poisoning on one hand… cookie dough on the other…

Eh, man wasn’t meant to live forever right?


#14

Luckily the flour I use is not general mills…and thanks for the egg correction.


#15

E coli is pervasive in the environment, and we have it in our digestive tracts normally. Of course, there are different kinds of E coli, some more dangerous than others. I recall, some years ago, reading a German study which found that people raised on farms were relatively immune to the more serious kinds. The reason, they surmised, was that kids raised on farms where there are cattle, are exposed to the manure of the cattle very early. At that age, they might get a little sick, but recover without undue trouble. After that, they acquire immunity.

Knowing that, I exposed my children to cattle corrals, let them play and work in them. Now, they expose their children in a similar way.

It’s highly probable that many years ago there was as much or more salmonella and E coli in the food supply than now, but people had early exposure and acquired immunity. One is also put to mind of the recent studies indicating that farm kids don’t have the allergies that city kids do. Same thing, I guess.


#16

Do you think exposure to the dirt, grime, and pollution in New York can substitute for lack of exposure to cattle manure with regard to developing immunity?


#17

Plus you know… cookie dough.


#18

Imaginably if one eats it early enough in life, one might have greater early resistance and acquire immunity to that particular kind. There are certain kinds of diseases that affect the very young much less than it does adults. Interestingly, polio is one of them. Polio is endemic in the third world, but most are not killed or crippled by it. They acquire it as babies, and mostly survive it without serious effect. In the first world, it was once most commonly acquired by teens or adults, and it was devastating to them.

But I don’t think we know what kind of E coli was in the cookie dough or what its source was.

Cattle are carriers of some of the most virulent strains of E coli. But for ages untold, some peoples (western Europeans among them) have lived in very close contact with cattle for millennia. There are a number of cattle vector diseases. In more modern times, people just do not have the early exposures they once had.


#19

There is a recipe online for cookie dough ice cream sandwiches which does not use eggs at all.

I remember the days when we used to eats large amounts of cake batter too.

I guess we’ve all courted death at some point. :wink:


#20

The warning is due to a specific outbreak of E. coli and a contaminated batch of flour. It doesn’t have to do with eggs.


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