Doors to the Sacred

I was wondering about your thoughts on Joseph Martos’s book “Doors to the Sacred” published by Liguori/Triumph. It does not have an Imprimatur. Is it true to the faith?

I haven’t read it. However, my understanding is that the imprimatur is only required of text books teaching the faith. That may well be why it doesn’t have one; and given that there are a multitude of good, faithful books out there without the imprimatur, perhaps that should not be used as a yardstick by which to judge.

A couple of readers on Amazon gave it high marks in their personal reviews. You can read a few pages of the first chapter (and see the Table of Contents and Index) on Amazon as well.

Looks like a good book!

[quote=johnk]I was wondering about your thoughts on Joseph Martos’s book “Doors to the Sacred” published by Liguori/Triumph. It does not have an Imprimatur. Is it true to the faith?
[/quote]

I have looked through it, not read it cover to cover. Nothing caused me to remove it from my library.

I used this book my junior year of UG for Sacraments (course title). Martos is incredibly on track theologically and his historical analysis of the development of sacraments is second to none. Liguori, fyi, puts out text that has gone through rigourous evaluation done by priests, lay theologians, and editorial staff. Read the book and also look at Bernie Cook’s Sacraments and Sacramentality.

I also had the book as a textbook, a long time ago. I remember that there were several “concerns” about its orthodoxy. However since I no longer have the text, I cannot comment directly on it or produce examples.

Here is an article which gives an unfavorable critique: "McBrien Catholicism"
catholic.net/rcc/Periodicals/Homiletic/June97/mcbrien.html

From the article:

A theology of the sacraments that minimizes or denies their function as instruments for the communication of grace is by no means peculiar to Richard McBrien. On the contrary, it is seeping widely throughout the sacramental theology taught in this country, as well as abroad. In varying degrees, and under different disguises, it appears in Bernard Cooke’s Sacraments and Sacramentality, Joseph Martos’s Doors to the Sacred and James Burtchaell’s booklet, Philemon’s Problem—to cite only a few examples.

Martos has also collaborated with Richard Rohr, which could cause some to be dubious of Martos’ prudence, since Rohr is a proponent of the Ennegram, and a “Call to Action” speaker. Rohr and Martos evidently coauthored two books on the “Wild Man”, which has something to do with “male spirituality”.

I think there are better books out there.

But that is just my opinion. Take it (and Martos) with a grain of (blessed) salt. :wink:

Hope that helps,
VC

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