Drivers vow to fight de Blasio plan to eliminate NYC horse-drawn carriages


#1

Horse-drawn carriage drivers are vowing to fight New York City's new mayor in his bid to eliminate the carriages from the Big Apple and replace them with vintage-style electric cars.

foxnews.com/politics/2014/01/09/nyc-carriage-drivers-vow-fightback-against-de-blasio-plan


#2

I heard the name last night Steve Nislick be mentioned in a discussion about the carriages, who is the former CEO of Edison Properties and found the following information. Steve Nislick donated thousands of dollars to De Blasio's campaign and started an organisation called New Yorkers for Clean, Livable and Safe Streets (NYCLASS) which endorsed Bill De Blasio.

NYCLASS is a 501(c)4 non-profit animal advocacy organization committed to ending New York City's carriage horse industry. NYCLASS advocates for retiring the carriage horses to sanctuary,[8] while modernizing the current industry with their alternative - an electric car called "the 21st Century Horseless Carriage."[9] Founded in 2008 by a coalition of prominent animal lovers and business leaders, NYCLASS has grown to over 110,000 supporters with activist chapters in all five boroughs.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NYCLASS_(New_Yorkers_for_Clean,_Livable,_and_Safe_Streets

Is it a coincidence that Bill de Blasio would adopt a priority of an organisation which endorsed him and whose founder donated money to his campaign?

Michael Gross wrote about Steve Nislick:

His connections to local politics are deep, and his company, according to New York City’s web site, employs legions of lobbyists to influence city decisions on real estate and zoning in its favor. So what? Nislick revealed his real (estate) agenda late last year when he produced and signed a brochure touting the Model-T plan — the same brochure a carriage-horse-lover sent to me last night. In it, Nislick shows his hand when he discusses those five stables where the horses are housed, all sitting between 10th Avenue and the West Side Highway in midtown, the same neighborhood where Edison operates many of its parking lots and storage warehouses. In a curious twist for a parking lot mogul, Nislick paints his proposal as “a green transportation alternative.” But my guess is that the green light in his eyes may be money not ecology. Why? The answer lies on page five of that brochure, which promises “a windfall for the carriage industry from the sale of its multi-million-dollar stables alone,” Nislick writes, before getting to his real point. “Currently, the stables consist of 64,000 square feet of valuable real estate on lots that could accomodate up to 150,000 square feet of development. These lots could be sold for new development.” What are the odds that good neighbor Nislick, the out-of-state real estate developer, simply covets those valuable, underdeveloped New York lots — and has teamed up with ambitious pols to use the emotions of animal rights activists as fuel for their own agendas? One man’s opinion?

mgross.com/gripebox/its-parkingtown-jake


#3

As Frank Zappa said:

"Politics is the entertainment branch of industry."

I don't think you'll find a more accurate and concise take on it.


#4

[quote="_Abyssinia, post:1, topic:351082"]
foxnews.com/politics/2014/01/09/nyc-carriage-drivers-vow-fightback-against-de-blasio-plan

[/quote]

Mayor Bill de Blasio, citing the complaints of animal rights activists, singled out Central Park's horse-drawn carriages as he took the helm of New York City last week. "We are going to get rid of the horse carriages. Period," de Blasio said. "They are not humane, they are not appropriate for the year 2014. It's over. So, just watch us do it."

Ah, yes. The sound of a tolerant progressive. :rolleyes:

Jon


#5

Not sure what more people expected of de Blasio. He’s got worse ideas than Bloomberg, and wherever he goes, misery will follow. Enjoy, NYC.

Also, Michael Gross was great on Family Ties.


#6

I think they’ll be surprised at the pushback. The carriages are very romantic and tourists love them. Driving around in a model t is not the same thing at all.


#7

There is no room for independent businesses in Progressivetopia.


#8

[quote="Geist, post:7, topic:351082"]
There is no room for independent businesses in Progressivetopia.

[/quote]

...Much less independent thought.

Jon


#9

So this is what a New York mayor sees as a pressing issue… okaaaaay :shrug:


#10

Only 9 years ago, a depowered New Orleans resorted to horse traction to pull its famous trolleys after Hurricane Katrina.

The Mayor may think horse traction is inappropriate in 2010s NYC, but Hurricane Sandy should have shown just how flimsy our technological 2010s world really is. Even in NYC.

ICXC NIKA.


#11

What a dumb move by the new Mayor…


#12

Maybe they can compromise and keep the carriages in Central Park but off the city streets?

We have carriages in a city near us and the horses are well-kept. Very few incidents because it's a tourist oriented city. It is, however, much less crowded than NYC.

I do not have carriage animals but I have taken a few of our gentle animals to fairs and events. I plan ahead for the animal's comfort and they do well. I don't usually get paid , however, the reaction of people (both adults and children) is worth the trouble. Seeing pictures of animals on the internet doesn't replace the type of empathy that develops when people really get to pet a donkey, horse or cow.


#13

The impression I get is that the man cares more about horses than unborn babies. (Shakes head).


#14

Mayor Bill de Blasio, citing the complaints of animal rights activists, singled out Central Park's horse-drawn carriages as he took the helm of New York City last week. "We are going to get rid of the horse carriages. Period," de Blasio said. "They are not humane, they are not appropriate for the year 2014. It's over. So, just watch us do it."

I thought, according to Secular Liberals, we are "Free To Choose." :rolleyes:


#15

Like every politician who came before and will come after him; no. This issue was part of his campaign so no one should be surprised.


#16

So long as we choose what they think is best.

You know: “If -]you/-] I like your health care plan, you can keep your health care plan. Period.”

Jon


#17

[quote="coachkfan1, post:13, topic:351082"]
The impression I get is that the man cares more about horses than unborn babies. (Shakes head).

[/quote]

..or the companies and drivers who make a living.

Jon


#18

[quote="JonNC, post:17, topic:351082"]
..or the companies and drivers who make a living.

Jon

[/quote]

Progressivetopia does not understand this concept of "making a living"; one simply gets checks in exchange for votes.

NY is expanding its welfare (again).

nydailynews.com/news/politics/cuomo-propose-116m-housing-jobs-state-address-article-1.1566648

The government will provide for them...it taketh much and giveth little after all.


#19

[quote="Geist, post:18, topic:351082"]
Progressivetopia does not understand this concept of "making a living"; one simply gets checks in exchange for votes.

NY is expanding its welfare (again).

nydailynews.com/news/politics/cuomo-propose-116m-housing-jobs-state-address-article-1.1566648

The government will provide for them...it taketh much and giveth little after all.

[/quote]

Forgive me. I forgot. "You didn't build that!"

Jon


#20

[quote="lutheran_farmer, post:12, topic:351082"]
Maybe they can compromise and keep the carriages in Central Park but off the city streets?

We have carriages in a city near us and the horses are well-kept. Very few incidents because it's a tourist oriented city. It is, however, much less crowded than NYC.

I do not have carriage animals but I have taken a few of our gentle animals to fairs and events. I plan ahead for the animal's comfort and they do well. I don't usually get paid , however, the reaction of people (both adults and children) is worth the trouble. Seeing pictures of animals on the internet doesn't replace the type of empathy that develops when people really get to pet a donkey, horse or cow.

[/quote]

I agree about the empathy that can develop from contact with a live animal. And the draft horse breeds that pull the carriages can inspire respect by their sheer size and awesomeness. I've seen some obnoxious kids and teenagers find a new sense of quietness and reverence when they groom and ride a horse.

I have horses; the dam of one of them was a Percheron (draft) carriage horse from Chicago, while his sire was an Andalusian light riding horse type who worked at Medieval Times in Chicago. Both parents got months off work to rest at a farm in the country every year. If I remember correctly, the NYC horses are supposed to get a similar rest period.

Also, there are now rubber boots rather than metal shoes which are used to improve the horses' comfort and traction on asphalt. Overall, life for a carriage horse does not need to be inherently cruel. It can be cruel. But it does not need to be, and any decent horseman will make his horse's welfare a priority.


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