Early hominid first walked on two legs in the woods

Not on the savannah as first thought.

sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091008113341.htm

Peace,
Ed

We’re in dicovery mode thanks be to God.
Tomorrow morning we’ll send a rocket into the moon to look for water. If we can find it, we’ll have this prescious item, a needed commodity, to survive up there should we ever build a base on the moon someday.

On Discovery 9PM Sunday, be sure to tune into a special as to the topic of the OP here as to our oldest known ancester discovered.

msnbc.msn.com/id/33110809/ns/technology_and_science-science/

This is a major problem for the Darwinian-storytelling enterprise. They’re going to have to make up a whole new chapter now.

I notice that nowhere in that article did they give a “new explanation” for why hominids walked upright in the forest. They did admit that “Darwin got it wrong”, but nobody cares since he was an old-guy and evolutionary theory is only as valid as the most recent contradictory claim made 10 minutes ago.

The prior evolutionary fact (“more certain than gravity”) was that humans began to walk upright because when they moved to the savannah they had to see over the grass. That was pure, hard science - of course.

Now, the new fact is that they walked upright in the forest, alongside chimpanzees who were on all-fours. Why did that happen?

It will be very important for evolutionists to come up with a new version of the story quickly. I hope they get their most imaginative scientists to invent something soon.

Evolution is a storytelling device and the deaus ex machina aspects of it are infinite.

So let’s look at one possible scenario. Man decides to start walking upright to see over the grass. The local bigger-than-he-is predators spot him. What is he going to do? Hide in the grass? Their sense of smell will pick him up eventually. He could try to run but odds are the predator is faster, after all, man is brand new to this walking thing. Who knows if he had figured out the running part yet? By putting him back in the forest, man can still pick fruit and if a predator spots him, he could always climb up a tree. But we do not yet have an explanation about why walking in open spaces would really be a practical option. Why did man eventually leave the forest?

Peace,
Ed

Very good summary, Ed. The story didn’t make any sense the first time and now that hominids actually could walk upright in the forest, there’s even less of an explanation.

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