Early voting begins in White House race


#1

Brace yourselves: Election Day has begun.

Some federal write-in absentee ballots, which are typically reserved for people serving dangerous foreign deployments or stints on submarines, have already started to come in. And that trickle of ballots will soon become a flood, with early voting set to begin in several states around the country.

The first round of early ballots will be dropped in the mail in North Carolina on Friday, kicking off a nearly nine-week sprint of early and absentee voting before the final results are tallied on Nov. 8.
Alabama elections officials will begin putting ballots in the mail on Sept. 15. By the following week, ballots from all 50 states will be on their way to members of the Armed Services and registered voters living abroad.

On September 23, voters in Minnesota will be the first with a chance to cast their ballots early, at in-person locations around the state. Polls open in South Dakota and Michigan the following day. By the end of September, voters in seven states will be able to cast ballots in person.

thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/presidential-races/294863-early-voting-begins-in-white-house-race


#2

Election 2016 Clinton Trump Spread
RCP Poll Average 45.6 42.8 Clinton +2.8
4-Way RCP Average 41.2 39.1 Clinton +2.1


#3

The only moral vote is “none of the above”. If “none of the above” actually won it would expose the lie that voters are happy with the options given to them by the current One-Party system operating under two different party names.


#4

Still undecided. May let The Spirit guide me in the booth. I am halfway convinced to vote the same way as I did in the first election I voted in, writing in Barry Goldwater. I mean, if we can have dead people voting, why not elect a dead president?


#5

Good. Let’s get this over with. And from now on let’s do snap elections like the Brits do.


#6

I loathe early voting. Too many voters commit when a lot can happen to sway an opinion or alter an election in the next sixty days. I don’t understand why it is so insurmountable to have one day of voting every four years. There will always be cases where a person simply cannot, but they are rare. I voted the morning of my first daughter’s birth in the 2010 midterms (with my wife’s blessing, of course).


#7

I can understand absentee ballots but totally reject “early” voting. It should all happen on the same day, everywhere (adjusting for time differences which are unavoidable).

Ed


#8

Im voting early. Im a nurse who works 12 hour shifts and there is no logical way that I can just leave work and make it to the voting booth on the day of the election. I’m not voting for either Trump or Clinton anyways so if anything more changes between them between now and the election anyways is irrelevant to me due to the fact that I’m voting third party.


#9

Your concerns are IMO the reason why the Dems pushed for early voting.so much can happen and if they have secured the vote already well,you know…:cool:


#10

Did your wife vote that day in person?

If not then I think you have your answer.

And in all honesty, by this point in the election we pretty much know everything about the candidates. They’ve been vetted and studied ad nauseum for over 2 years by this point. Nothing will come out in the next 60 days that will sway the vast majority of voters opinions.


#11

And how do you suppose those on foreign deployments on say submarines are to vote on that one day when there’s no guarantee they’ll be anywhere near a polling place? That’s why they have early voting.

Not sure why anyone would loathe allowing those sacrificing more than most to cast their votes. :confused:


#12

Pretty sure that isn’t the reason for loathing early voting:rolleyes:


#13

Leaning towards Darrell Castle (Constitution Party) at the moment, not a strong feeling towards him though given he couldn’t even get on the ballot in his home state. :shrug:


#14

I am fine with absentee voting for military personnel. However, this local absentee voting two months before the election is just nonsense. This is just about facilitating vote fraud and everyone knows it. Th credibility of the US government is declining as a result of this fraud.


#15

I’d be up for a shorter campaign cycle and then maybe 1-2 days of voting, and require absentee ballots to have same postmarks. Exit polling is good but the early results can’t be published while the polls are open.


#16

I did write that I understand absentee votes - no problem.

Ed


#17

When I was active duty USAF, we voted by absentee ballot. Easy. Now, getting democrats to honor the absentee ballots was a chore, but I digress.

I just think it typifies our modern society where everything has to be made easier. A person who has shift work, trips planned, or a baby due can and always has been able to vote absentee.

Having an unplanned emergency will always be a risk that early voting will not cure. You won’t know if you are having an emergency because it is unplanned.

It signals to me the lack of import our citizenry put on the vote. Somehow, we survived for ~200 years without early voting.

And if you don’t think opinions change, take a look at polling from September 1 until election day for the elections since 1980 or so. A 1% swing is a huge number of people, and swings much higher than that often occur.

Oh well, its my opinion on the matter, and if others feel differently, who cares anyway.


#18

For a lot of that 200 years a large portion of our citizenry wasn’t allowed to legally or practically vote.


#19

There is no way I could ever vote for Hilary and my vote is for Trump. I have been participating in early voting the last 6 years. It is very convenient. I used to like going to the polls and voting on the day of the election, but I am older now. I live in a relatively small community. I just wish we got some kind of receipt confirming our vote.


#20

Trump closes in on Clinton’s projected electoral lead: Reuters/Ipsos Poll

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Republican Donald Trump appears to have carved out a wider path to the White House as a number of states including Florida and Ohio are no longer considered likely wins for Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, according to the latest Reuters/Ipsos States of the Nation project released on Saturday.

The project, which combines opinion polls with an analysis of voting patterns under different election scenarios, still shows Clinton would have the best chance of winning the presidency if the Nov. 8 election were held today. Yet Trump has caught up to her level of support in several states.

Clinton now has an 83 percent chance of winning the election by an average of 47 votes in the Electoral College, the body that ultimately selects the president. In late August, the States of the Nation estimated that Clinton had a 95 percent chance of winning by an average of 108 electoral votes.

Over the past few weeks, Clinton’s lead in the national polls has slipped considerably. Polls tend to narrow as Election Day nears, and the Clinton campaign has struggled to overcome controversy about how she handled classified information while serving as secretary of state.

A separate Reuters/Ipsos poll of likely voters showed an 8-point lead for Clinton has vanished since the last week of August.

yahoo.com/news/trump-closes-clintons-projected-electoral-lead-reuters-ipsos-135210513.html


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