Eating meat on friday during lent a mortal sin?

I know many catholics that do. Mortal or venial?

Definitely not a mortal sin.

I doubt it could be considered a venial sin, unless the intent was a deliberate rebellion and even then it would not be for me to judge. In that instance, I could only suggest taking it to the Sacrament of Reconciliation for the healing of the soul.

Simple forgetting can happen and when it does some people feel the need to undertake a penance such as extra prayers or maybe giving a little extra to the Church (whether in time or a financial donation), it depends on the person and their circumstances. In cases of doubt, your priest can offer sage advice.

In the UK, it is perhaps easier for us as we should abstain from meat every Friday. The first year I started, it was difficult and I fell a couple of times. My consolation after repentance, was that God knew my heart and intent.

It is a grave sin. Which means that if they have full knowledge and make a concious decision to do so, knowing it is grave, than it constitutes a mortal sin.

I was taught as a child that it is one thing if you forgot it was Friday and ate meat. I was told it was a venial sin, if done purposefully.

In all reality a mortal sin breaks one of the ten commandments (to think of it simply). I do not see eating meat on a Friday of Lent as breaking any one of them. But who knows what someone’s reason is. So I supposed even then it depends on why. :shrug:

A “substantial” breaking of the penitential discipline is grave.

II. 1. The time of Lent preserves its penitential character. The days of penitence to be observed under obligation through-out the Church are all Fridays and Ash Wednesday, that is to say the first days of “Grande Quaresima” (Great Lent), according to the diversity of the rite. Their substantial observance binds gravely.

ewtn.com/library/PAPALDOC/P6PAEN.htm that was one take from that time…one may find other sources subsequently).

Certainly to simply not fast and abstain at all or a substantial number - without the needed dispensation or health reason would be grave matter.

One source I ran across from a Bishop: diometuchen.org/bishop/lenten-instructions/

It is grave matter. Go to Confession after the steak house.

Glenda

The OP is not asking about “forgetting”.

It is a sin of grave matter to eat meat on Fridays during Lent.

Exactly.

The rules regarding Fasting and Abstinence are one of the six precepts of the Church and once a person has become Catholic, they are binding under pain of sin. They aren’t binding on non-Catholics and some are age related. But once they apply, breaking them is as serious as breaking one of the Ten Commandments.

All six are here:
Attending Mass on all Sundays and holy days of obligation.
Receiving the Holy Eucharist during the Easter season.
Confessing your sins at least once a year.
Fasting and abstaining on appointed days.
Observing the marriage laws of the Church.
Contributing to the support of the Church.

Glenda

From the above Bishop:

“The obligation of fast and abstinence, as a whole, is a serious obligation. While failure to observe any penitential day in itself may not be considered serious, the failure to observe any penitential days at all, or a substantial number of them without good cause, would be considered a grave matter.”

It is theSubstantial breaking that is grave…

See above.

Such is the Discipline -as given by the Pope.

From the above Bishop:

“The obligation of fast and abstinence, as a whole, is a serious obligation. While failure to observe any penitential day in itself may not be considered serious, the failure to observe any penitential days at all, or a substantial number of them without good cause, would be considered a grave matter.”

(of course it can be said that it can also be grave to deliberately show contempt for the penitential discipline of the Church–but then that is another matter -and of course if I say eat a little meat willie nillie on a single Friday believing that it will be mortal - well then too I need to goto confession -just like if I do not go to a Holy Day Mass willie nillie - believing I am obliged to go -even though objectively that year it was not a day of Obligation --(with full knowledge and deliberate consent of course)).

I will go with all those who posted above and will obviously comply with the discipline of the Church regarding abstinence. But I just have to say that if anyone ended up in hell because they ate a hot dog during Lent it would give the serial killer quite the chuckle. I can’t imagine anyone eating a burger on Friday with the intention of rejecting God. There is the letter of the law and then there is the spirit of the law. If someone ate meat on Friday with the full intention of rejecting God then they have more to deal with than the hot dog. I believe that those who are in union with God see this as a discipline and treat it as such. It just seems unreasonable to think that anyone would use this as a means of eternal separation from God. Just my :twocents:

I simply added forgetting because the OP did not mention the circumstances that lead or led to someone eating meat on a Friday in Lent.

How do we know a person’s circumstances e.g. if they are excused? I would prefer not to cast the first stone, especially as after reverting, no one told me about it for years. I only knew when the Bishops Conference in the UK gently reminded everyone that Friday was a day we abstained from meat (except for feast days). There was no stoning, accusations or demands for repentance, simply a loving guiding back to the right path.

Reading the following, it seems that there are circumstances in the USA where it is not a sin of grave matter, indicating an acceptance that there are exceptional circumstances (which I can only assume would be confirmed by a priest):

Those who are excused from fast or abstinence Besides those outside the age limits, those of unsound mind, the sick, the frail, pregnant or nursing women according to need for meat or nourishment, manual laborers according to need, guests at a meal who cannot excuse themselves without giving great offense or causing enmity and other situations of moral or physical impossibility to observe the penitential discipline. Source: ewtn.com/faith/lent/fast.htm

The above is just my view that maybe, we should not be so quick to judge, especially if we don’t know all the facts.

I wanted to correct you, Avilla123 that it actually is a mortal sin to eat meat on Friday during lent.

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