Ebay Auctions off Consecrated Host


#1

Brothers and Sisters in Christ.

I was quite disturbed to learn, today, that eBay has
auctioned off a consecrated host. Fortunately the
host was purchased by a Knight of Columbus who has
vowed to properly dispose of it; however, I find the
actions of eBay to be incredibly sacreligious.

Details of the story are here:

spiritdaily.com/Hostbought.htm.

Please share this information with other Catholics and
write to Ebay so they know that this action is
upsetting to you. The more people who complain, the
less likely they will allow such an atrocity to happen
in the future.

Yours in Christ

David


#2

Thankyou for posting.We have several threads about that including action threads where you can make your voice heard.E-bay said they will not prevent this from happening again,so weneed to make noise about this sacrilige:mad:


#3

I wonder if E bay would have done this if it was a speacial sacred object of another religion? I would bet not…christian bashing espeacily catholic bashing seems to be the “in” thing at the moment… Maybe the only way E bay would listen is if a class action was brought forwarded?


#4

I have mixed reaction about whether it was good that the Knight bought it. It saved this particular host, but opens the door wide for extortion in the future, especially given the publicity this has received.

I’m not saying the Knight did anything wrong. I just question whether it was strategically sound. After working as a tax preparer in an area where most client are low to middle income, I have seen what people will do for $2,000. For $800 difference on a return, one newlywed couple pretended to be unmarried when they found out how much money was at stake. I caught them and refused to file a fraudulent return for them, but surely they went into another tax office with a better prepared lie.

I have no doubt this will spawn worldwide attempts to ransom consecrated hosts.

As for the host? Well, if Peter had gotten wind of Judas’s plot and offered him 40 silver pieces not to betray Jesus, would God’s will would have been served? Sounds harsh, but I’m grasping at straws here.

This just sounds like an awfully easy way for satan to extort money from Catholics to empower his minions.

The signs of the end times just get more numerous every year.

Alan


#5

[quote=AlanFromWichita]I have mixed reaction about whether it was good that the Knight bought it. It saved this particular host, but opens the door wide for extortion in the future, especially given the publicity this has received.

I’m not saying the Knight did anything wrong. I just question whether it was strategically sound. After working as a tax preparer in an area where most client are low to middle income, I have seen what people will do for $2,000. For $800 difference on a return, one newlywed couple pretended to be unmarried when they found out how much money was at stake. I caught them and refused to file a fraudulent return for them, but surely they went into another tax office with a better prepared lie.

I have no doubt this will spawn worldwide attempts to ransom consecrated hosts.

As for the host? Well, if Peter had gotten wind of Judas’s plot and offered him 40 silver pieces not to betray Jesus, would God’s will would have been served? Sounds harsh, but I’m grasping at straws here.

This just sounds like an awfully easy way for satan to extort money from Catholics to empower his minions.

The signs of the end times just get more numerous every year.

Alan
[/quote]

I agree Alan I am appalled:mad: This makes me sick,and it was said on FOX last night that e-bay banned the sale of Mormom garments because they were sacred to them,but Catholics are being tread under foot along with our Lord being stolen and sold:banghead:


#6

hola de nuevo:

i have email newspapers, the church goverment (archdiosesis) (hope thats how it writes in english) and some franciscan orders to spread the word and help put pressure on ebay, and i will continue until they stop.


#7

Be careful folks, eBay is a vehicle for people to auction off their stuff.

Granted it COULD be policed for spiritual items, but that’s not what eBay does, eBay would be the equivalent of a public access TV Channel or even this forum… eBay did not put the consecrated host on there, one of their users did. Going after ebay would be like going after Catholic Answers because someone on their forums posted heresy.


#8

[quote=misterX]I wonder if E bay would have done this if it was a speacial sacred object of another religion? I would bet not…christian bashing espeacily catholic bashing seems to be the “in” thing at the moment… Maybe the only way E bay would listen is if a class action was brought forwarded?
[/quote]

You might be right. Money talks.

Then again, I’m not sure whether legal action would be an effective weapon for this spiritual problem. After all, if we can’t get the law to protect babies, I rather doubt we can get the law to protect what appears to be a piece of bread.

Alan


#9

[quote=Lisa4Catholics]I agree Alan I am appalled:mad: This makes me sick,and it was said on FOX last night that e-bay banned the sale of Mormom garments because they were sacred to them,but Catholics are being tread under foot along with our Lord being stolen and sold:banghead:
[/quote]

OMG, then we must pray for those at ebay responsible for these decisions. I’d hate to be anywhere around when they have to answer for themselves.

Where is the ACLU? Imagine if someone auctioned off a piece of bread with the “n-word” on it? You’d better believe they would mobilize swarms of lawyers to go against anybody connected who had money. Someone would go to jail for hate crimes.

Alan


#10

[quote=gelsbern]Be careful folks, eBay is a vehicle for people to auction off their stuff.

Granted it COULD be policed for spiritual items, but that’s not what eBay does, eBay would be the equivalent of a public access TV Channel or even this forum… eBay did not put the consecrated host on there, one of their users did. Going after ebay would be like going after Catholic Answers because someone on their forums posted heresy.
[/quote]

Actually, eBay does police their auctions. They remove auctions for items they believe to be inappropriate, fraudulent, or illegal. They already completely remove auctions that include racial slurs in the content, even if it has nothing to do with the item. It is entirely apropo to go after eBay, since such a huge community believes it has been slighted by eBay’s actions.


#11

[quote=AlanFromWichita]OMG, then we must pray for those at ebay responsible for these decisions. I’d hate to be anywhere around when they have to answer for themselves.

Where is the ACLU? Imagine if someone auctioned off a piece of bread with the “n-word” on it? You’d better believe they would mobilize swarms of lawyers to go against anybody connected who had money. Someone would go to jail for hate crimes.

Alan
[/quote]

The ACLU is notably silent:nope: A lawyer on FOX news said they have banned the sale of Mormon religious garments so they wouldn’t be offended:mad: This further shows satan at work:banghead:


#12

No, it would not be the same, especially since it involves contract law. A person’s opinion on a forum does not equate to a material object. And since eBay does police (i.e. look at their extensive policies), eBay cannot be simply let off as an accessory with the attention brought to their attention. Thanks and God Bless.


#13

Here in the US, at least, we live in a pluralistic society. We had better be careful here in our zeal to use the force of law to protect what is sacred according to our own faith. Some people’s dinners are other people’s sacred cows.

Personally I would not sanction a legal suit against a grocery store for selling beef, nor would I like to see a group of militant vegetarians bringing one about.

Alan


#14

Although well intended, I don’t think it was a good idea to buy the host. It’s sort of like giving in to terrorist demands.


#15

I have recently learned that there is a black market for consecrated hosts in Rome. The price is about $800 - $1200. The price varies depending upon the source (church and priest).

This is a hate crime and should be cause for a great deal of attention and legal action on the part of Catholics.

While we ask the Father to protect us from evil – it is also within our means to address this religious hate crime both politically, legally, and socially – to protect our Lord from desecration.

Call your Senator and Representative and define this for them, explain that this is a hate crime.

Sacpular


#16

[left]April 13, 2005
[/left]
**CATHOLICS TO eBay: TREAT US LIKE FAT PEOPLE **

After a consecrated Host was recently auctioned online by eBay (it has since been sold, purportedly to a Knights of Columbus member who bought it out of respect), the Catholic League was deluged with complaints. The policy that eBay cited as a reason for not pulling the item was the subject of the following letter that Catholic League president William Donohue sent to the company today:

“As president of the nation’s largest Catholic civil rights organization, I was disturbed to learn that eBay would unnecessarily offend 63 million Catholics in the U.S., and 1.1 billion worldwide, by selling a consecrated Host online. To Catholics, the Eucharist is the center of our religion, worthy of the utmost reverence. While we don’t expect non-Catholics to maintain the same perspective, we do expect them to be respectful of our sentiments. That is why the decision not to withdraw this item is so disturbing.

“More than disturbing is the reasoning behind the decision. The Community Watch Team of eBay’s Trust & Safety division said that ‘even though these auctions may be offensive to some, please remember that most of the time the law does not prohibit these items.’ But the law has nothing to do with this issue: lots of things are legal and immoral at the same time. Moreover, we are told that eBay has decided not to prohibit any item ‘endowed with sacred properties by certain religious groups.’ Really? Since the policy is conditional, i.e., it refers only to ‘certain’ groups, it would be instructive to know which religious groups eBay would protect. Obviously, Catholics did not make the cut, so who did? And to say that eBay is ‘religiously neutral’ is disingenuous: all moral decisions are judgmental—none can be neutral.

“Last fall, eBay banned the book, *Why Is America So Fat? *Was that an example of your neutrality? Or maybe I’m missing something—was the book endowed with some sacred properties that eBay honors? In any event, the next time someone insults Catholics, please think of us as fat people.”
catholicleague.org/


#17

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