Eclipse at the time of the crucifixion


#1

It says in Mark’s gospel that there was darkness from noon until three because of an eclipse.
I always wondered if anyone in the scientific field has ever tried to check just when an eclipse took place at the time of Jesus’ death. Does anyone know?


#2

Gee, I just read something about that not too long ago. It was not a local eclipse. It was recorded by a historian maybe?

I'll see if I can find it.


#3

[quote="fred_conty, post:1, topic:320186"]
It says in Mark's gospel that there was darkness from noon until three because of an eclipse.
I always wondered if anyone in the scientific field has ever tried to check just when an eclipse took place at the time of Jesus' death. Does anyone know?

[/quote]

there is a show on EWTN that talks about this don't remember the name of it but it was pretty cool.


#4

[quote="fred_conty, post:1, topic:320186"]
It says in Mark's gospel that there was darkness from noon until three because of an eclipse.
I always wondered if anyone in the scientific field has ever tried to check just when an eclipse took place at the time of Jesus' death. Does anyone know?

[/quote]

Yes, it has been scientifically proven that there was a blood moon eclipse on the day of Jesus' death. I watched a documentary on how they tracked it a few years back.


#5

[quote="dshix, post:4, topic:320186"]
Yes, it has been scientifically proven that there was a blood moon eclipse on the day of Jesus' death. I watched a documentary on how they tracked it a few years back.

[/quote]

I'd be interested in seeing that documentary if you remember the name.

Here's a pretty good starting point on this topic with the science involved, some of the apologetics, and arguments for and against the historicity.


#6

[quote="fred_conty, post:1, topic:320186"]
It says in Mark's gospel that there was darkness from noon until three because of an eclipse.
I always wondered if anyone in the scientific field has ever tried to check just when an eclipse took place at the time of Jesus' death. Does anyone know?

[/quote]

It is Luke who says that the sun was obscured. From a natural POV, it couldn't have been a solar eclipse because it was the Passover, when the moon was full (solar eclipses only occur during the new moon phase, when the moon is between the sun and the Earth).


#7

[quote="Mike_from_NJ, post:5, topic:320186"]
I'd be interested in seeing that documentary if you remember the name.

Here's a pretty good starting point on this topic with the science involved, some of the apologetics, and arguments for and against the historicity.

[/quote]

that was very interesting thanks!


#8

How could it possibly have been an eclipse since it was Passover, and therefore a full moon?


#9

A lunar eclipse happens during a full moon. The moon does turn red in color. That would not explain the darkened sky however.

Posted from Catholic.com App for Android


#10

[quote="Lion777, post:9, topic:320186"]
A lunar eclipse happens during a full moon. The moon does turn red in color. That would not explain the darkened sky however.

Posted from Catholic.com App for Android

[/quote]

Well, sure but not between the sixth and ninth hours in the spring at that latitude. The sun would still be high in the sky at that time of day and the moon not risen yet.


#11

[quote="porthos11, post:8, topic:320186"]
How could it possibly have been an eclipse since it was Passover, and therefore a full moon?

[/quote]

Exactly.


#12

[quote="fred_conty, post:1, topic:320186"]
It says in Mark's gospel that there was darkness from noon until three because of an eclipse.
I always wondered if anyone in the scientific field has ever tried to check just when an eclipse took place at the time of Jesus' death. Does anyone know?

[/quote]

I don't see where Mark's gospel says the darkness was because of an eclipse. What version are you getting that from? I know that there has been speculation on an eclipse causing it, but the version I have and a few others I scanned online don't specifically state that an eclipse caused it.


#13

NHOMIN.VN IN ?N THEO NHÓM

NHOMIN.VN Liên h?: 0917290012

IN ?N *theo nhóm ch?t lu?ng cao online duy nh?t t?i NHOMIN.VN *

Hãy dang ký thÃnh viên và th?a s?c in ?n online vô cùng d?c dáo, ti?t ki?m chi phÃ* t?i da t?i NHOMIN.VN

Chúng tôi nh?n in:

TIÊU D? THU 1,000d/cái/1,000 cái A4

DANH THI?P 33k/h?p/5 h?p/n?i dung, 32k/h?p/10 h?p/n?i dung

PHONG BÌ 990d/cái/1.000 cái 12x22, 1,290d/cái/1,000 cái A5, 1,850d/cái/1,000 cái A4

T? ROI 950d/t?/1.000 t? roi A5, 1,000d/t?/1.000 t? roi A4, 1,500d/t?/1.000 t? roi A3

K?P FILE 2,850d/cái/1.000 k?p file A4, C250, 3,000d/cái/1.000 k?p file A4, C300

CATALOGUE, BROCHURE, PROFILE

BANDROLL, BANNER, POSTER, STANDEE, BACKDROP

**CAM K?T CH?T LU?NG CAO VÀ GIÁ H?P LÝ NH?T **

Chi?t kh?u m?nh cho khách hÃ*ng thu?ng xuyên và d?i lý*

Liên h? tr?c ti?p hotline **0968 26 7777 **d? du?c tu v?n

**VAN PHÒNG NHÓM IN

*B20, Lô 6, Dô th? D?nh Công, HoÃ*ng Mai, Hà N?i

Hotline: 0968 267 777

Tel: 04 62 935 989 Fax: 04 36 400 958

info@gleap.vn - gleap.vn

D?i lý t?i Qu?n Thanh Xuân

25A, Lê Van Thiêm, Thanh Xuân, HÃ* N?i

Hotline: 0917 290 012

Tel: 04 62 923 263 Fax: 04 35 579 572

info@gleap.vn - gleap.vn

D?i lý t?i Qu?n C?u Gi?y

14, Trung Yên 3, Trung Hòa, Câ`u Giâ?y, HÃ* N?i

Hotline: 0917 785 778

Tel: 04 62 923 263 Fax: 04 35 579 572

info@gleap.vn -gleap.vn

IN ?N THEO NHÓM CUNG LÀ CÁCH B?O V? MÔI TRU?NG


#14

The version we reac on Palm Sunday states that it was an eclipse.


#15

[quote="LaSainte, post:14, topic:320186"]
The version we reac on Palm Sunday states that it was an eclipse.

[/quote]

Ah, that's why I couldn't find it. That's in Luke, not Mark. I hadn't noticed that it said it was because of an eclipse of the sun this weekend. Sigh.


#16

[quote="LaSainte, post:14, topic:320186"]
The version we reac on Palm Sunday states that it was an eclipse.

[/quote]

That is from Luke (23:45). And even then there is a disagreement between the Greek manuscripts as to the actual verb. The majority of manuscripts say that the sun was "darkened" (eskotisthe); on the other hand, the earliest and best witnesses say that the sun had "failed" (eklipontos). The latter is the more difficult reading because it is open to the interpretation of a solar eclipse (although the verb does necessarily mean it), and thus more likely to be the original, with the "darkened" reading being an attempt by scribes to smoothen the difficulty.

Some early Christian writers have already disagreed to the idea that the darkness was caused by a solar eclipse. The 3rd-century Christian historian Sextus Julius Africanus, pointing to a supposed reference by the chronicler Thallus to the darkness during the crucifixion, objects to Thallus' description of a solar eclipse, noting the impossibility of such an occurrence during the full moon. (He also cites another source, the 2nd-century chronicler Phlegon of Tralles, which apparently also talks of a solar eclipse.) Tertullian notes that those who were unaware of the darkness' cause and the prediction of it "no doubt thought it was an eclipse."


#17

[quote="Incomplete, post:12, topic:320186"]
I don't see where Mark's gospel says the darkness was because of an eclipse. What version are you getting that from? I know that there has been speculation on an eclipse causing it, but the version I have and a few others I scanned online don't specifically state that an eclipse caused it.

[/quote]

Sorry, it was in Luke's gospel.

I would think it had to be a solar eclipse since it was dark from noon until three. A lunar eclipse would not cause darkness.


#18

[quote="patrick457, post:16, topic:320186"]
That is from Luke (23:45). And even then there is a disagreement between the Greek manuscripts as to the actual verb. The majority of manuscripts say that the sun was "darkened" (eskotisthe); on the other hand, the earliest and best witnesses say that the sun had "failed" (eklipontos). The latter is the more difficult reading because it is open to the interpretation of a solar eclipse (although the verb does necessarily mean it), and thus more likely to be the original, with the "darkened" reading being an attempt by scribes to smoothen the difficulty.

Some early Christian writers have already disagreed to the idea that the darkness was caused by a solar eclipse. The 3rd-century Christian historian Sextus Julius Africanus, pointing to a supposed reference by the chronicler Thallus to the darkness during the crucifixion, objects to Thallus' description of a solar eclipse, noting the impossibility of such an occurrence during the full moon. (He also cites another source, the 2nd-century chronicler Phlegon of Tralles, which apparently also talks of a solar eclipse.) Tertullian notes that those who were unaware of the darkness' cause and the prediction of it "no doubt thought it was an eclipse."

[/quote]

Good information to have. Thanks.


#19

[quote="fred_conty, post:17, topic:320186"]
Sorry, it was in Luke's gospel.

I would think it had to be a solar eclipse since it was dark from noon until three. A lunar eclipse would not cause darkness.

[/quote]

Normally, total darkness in a solar eclipse would only last for a few minutes (the longest possible duration would be around seven-and-a-half minutes; most eclipses don't even last five). Three hours is too long: the moon violating its orbit and staying still for the space of that time would be a miracle.


#20

[quote="Incomplete, post:18, topic:320186"]
Good information to have. Thanks.

[/quote]

This is what Julius says:

Concerning each of his deeds and his cures, both of bodies and souls, and the secrets of his knowledge, and his Resurrection from the dead, this has been explained with complete adequacy by his disciples and the apostles before us. A most terrible darkness fell over all the world, the rocks were torn apart by an earthquake, and many places both in Judaea and the rest of the world were thrown down.

In the third book of his Histories, Thallos dismisses this darkness as a solar eclipse. In my opinion, this is nonsense. For the Hebrews celebrate the Passover on Luna 14, and what happened to the Saviour occurred one day before the Passover. But an eclipse of the sun takes place when the moon passes under the sun. The only time when this can happen is in the interval between the first day of the new moon and the last day of the old moon, when they are in conjunction. How then could one believe an eclipse took place when the moon was almost in opposition to the sun? So be it. Let what had happened beguile the masses, and let this wonderful sign to the world be considered a solar eclipse through an optical (illusion).

Phlegon records that during the reign of Tiberius Caesar there was a complete solar eclipse at full moon from the sixth to the ninth hour; it is clear that this is the one. But what have eclipses to do with an earthquake, rocks breaking apart, resurrection of the dead, and a universal disturbance of this nature?

Certainly an event of such magnitude has not been recalled for a long time. But it was a darkness created by God, because it happened that the Lord experienced his passion at that time. And reason proves that the seventy weeks of years mentioned in Daniel were completed in this time.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.