Ecumenical Relations w/Various Churches

"…Tensions have also continued between the Catholic Church and the separated churches of the East, always a delicate relationship. Pope John Paul II’s longstanding desire to visit Russia remains thwarted.

At the local level, there are continued instances where parish priests and sometimes bishops, while presiding at weddings and funerals, announce to their assembled congregations that non-Catholic Christians who happen to be in attendance are not to receive Holy Communion.

But the record also has some positive aspects. On October 31 (Reformation Day), 1999, there was a Lutheran-Catholic Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification signed in Augsburg, Germany, by official representatives of the Catholic Church and the Lutheran World Federation. Pope John Paul II hailed it as a “milestone” on the road to Christian unity.
Cardinal Avery Dulles pointed out in a lecture at Fordham University that the Joint Declaration “says clearly to a world that hovers on the brink of unbelief that the two churches that split Western Christendom on the issue of justification nearly five centuries ago are still united on truths of the highest import.”

The Declaration insisted that, while the condemnations issued by the Council of Trent in the 16th century remain part of the historical record, both sides have arrived at “new insights” into each other’s understanding of justification. The polemics of the Reformation period have been transcended, and neither side’s views merit condemnation any longer by the other. Whatever differences continue to exist between them “are acceptable” because they do not touch the heart of Christian faith.

Indeed, Cardinal Edward Cassidy, at the time President of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, acknowledged that “Serious difficulties remain, but they are secondary to what we hold in common. No longer may we look upon our different expressions of faith as being like two huge cannons drawn up in battle line and facing each other…We need, above all, to give thanks to God for this achievement.”

The next year, in May of 2000, a special consultation of Roman Catholic and Anglican bishops from thirteen regions of the world met for a week in Mississauga, Ontario, to review and evaluate 30 years of formal dialogue between the two churches, as well as to pray and worship together. The meeting was jointly convened by Cardinal Cassidy and the then-Archbishop of Canterbury, George L. Carey.

The consultation, which was a long time in preparation because of the sensitivity of issues to be discussed, had grown out of a visit by Archbishop Carey to Pope John Paul II in late 1996. Three years later, on January 18, 2000, Archbishop Carey assisted the pope in opening the holy door at St. Paul-Outside-the-Walls Basilica, inaugurating the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity.

"…But at least some additional seeds have been planted and, in the words of the late Cardinal Leo-Josef Suenens of Belgium regarding the documents of Vatican II itself, these seeds are only awaiting the sunlight of divine grace to begin to flower and blossom to the benefit of the whole Church.

the-tidings.com/2005/0114/essays.htm

So the Council of Trent was wrong?

Thank you Holy Spirit for the Ecumencial Movement!

yeah but what about Islam?

Bill A:

Islam and the other non-Christian religions are not engaged in ecumenical dialogue with the Catholic Church. Only Christians are.

They have their “own” dance with the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue.

Oddly, Judaism is lumped with the Christians under the auspices of the PCPCU, but with a separate Committee.

Sounds off base and unCatholic. It is as simple as this, if you do not believe in Our Lord, as the Jewish people and the Moslems, I have nothing to discuss with you, as far as religion goes. What is there to understand? What does my child learning about Ramadan help him or her to reach salvation and eternal happiness, when there is so much yet to learn about OUR faith that they do not know. As far as the two schismatic groups in the Orthodox and Protestants, the differences are so great now, and mindset so ingrained that these other groups hate us for centuries, and how much more of the faith and traditions do we have to do away with? Vatican II, if you ask most Orthodox Catholic, only made the rift GREATER as the traditions that they held so dear, we threw away.

Worry about your own flock, people close to you who dont even go to mass and worship and get them to go before, in my opinion all should be concerned about some great reunion. By all accounts, only 15% of Catholics go to mass, try working on getting those 85% to church, that would grow the church faster than weakening and another disaster in Vatican II ever could

[quote=CrusaderNY]Sounds off base and unCatholic.
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I suggest that the Pope and his advisors may know at least as much about Catholicism as you do.

[quote=CrusaderNY]It is as simple as this, if you do not believe in Our Lord, as the Jewish people and the Moslems, I have nothing to discuss with you, as far as religion goes.
[/quote]

It is not simple, it is an extremely complex matter and the pope and most of the bishops do not not agree with you on your approach to the subject.

[quote=CrusaderNY]IWhat is there to understand? What does my child learning about Ramadan help him or her to reach salvation and eternal happiness, when there is so much yet to learn about OUR faith that they do not know.
[/quote]

Most people and I am certain this includes your children, can grasp more than one subject simultaneously. They can certainly learn their own faith as well as be familiar, conversant and understanding of people who hold another.

[quote=CrusaderNY]As far as the two schismatic groups in the Orthodox and Protestants, the differences are so great now, and mindset so ingrained that these other groups hate us for centuries, and how much more of the faith and traditions do we have to do away with? Vatican II, if you ask most Orthodox Catholic, only made the rift GREATER as the traditions that they held so dear, we threw away.

Worry about your own flock, people close to you who dont even go to mass and worship and get them to go before, in my opinion all should be concerned about some great reunion. By all accounts, only 15% of Catholics go to mass, try working on getting those 85% to church, that would grow the church faster than weakening and another disaster in Vatican II ever could
[/quote]

The church has always. and will continue to “worry” about both; all churches are facing a tumultous and rapidly changing world, it affects the faith, the implementation of that faith, the passing along of it to future generations. None of us is immune. We are all in uncharted waters and the Pope has made clear he has cast his net “in duc et altum” in deep waters - like the original fisherman who followed Christ, we in the church accompany him into this vast, unknown and uncharted journey. Oremus!

I would like to suggest however, (to paraphrase Adali Stevenson), that it is better to be a person who chooses to light a candle than it is to curse the darkness.

Well then Sophia if you had all of these so called answers, then why did you start this string and ask the question? I will start learning about Moslems when some clerics start holding some liberal council and revise the Koran which blasphemes our Lord, as well as the Jews when the distance themselves from the Talmud which does the same. Just because the liberals have had their way for the past 50 years in the church does not mean that they are correct, as many Popes have started agendas such as Ecumenism only to see the times change and these policies thrown away. No, for the Church to survive it needs to strenthen itself, and re-establish its core values and beliefs, the liberalism of the US in the 60’s and 70’s only gave rise to extreme conservatism in the 80’s, 90’s and today. Liberalism and Catholicism are diametric opposite, and right now we are waiting for the liberal Cardinals and Bishops consecrated in the 60’s to the early 80’s to die off, so a new more Orthodox wave can come in and hopefully set this ship straight.

[quote=HagiaSophia]I suggest that the Pope and his advisors may know at least as much about Catholicism as you do.

It is not simple, it is an extremely complex matter and the pope and most of the bishops do not not agree with you on your approach to the subject.

Most people and I am certain this includes your children, can grasp more than one subject simultaneously. They can certainly learn their own faith as well as be familiar, conversant and understanding of people who hold another.

The church has always. and will continue to “worry” about both; all churches are facing a tumultous and rapidly changing world, it affects the faith, the implementation of that faith, the passing along of it to future generations. None of us is immune. We are all in uncharted waters and the Pope has made clear he has cast his net “in duc et altum” in deep waters - like the original fisherman who followed Christ, we in the church accompany him into this vast, unknown and uncharted journey. Oremus!

I would like to suggest however, (to paraphrase Adali Stevenson), that it is better to be a person who chooses to light a candle than it is to curse the darkness.
[/quote]

And I quote right from an Orthodox Catholic, and not Roman Catholic Perspective:

The word “ecumenism” is derived from the Greek word ecumene (oikoumenh), meaning the “world” or “universe.” This term was used by the Romans as a synonym for the Roman Empire, in that it was believed that it stretched to the four corners of the world. Thus all general councils convened by the Christian Roman Emperors were called Ecumenical (i.e., Universal, Imperial) Councils. The Archbishop of Constantinople (New Rome) was also called the Ecumenical Patriarch. But this title is not to be understood in the sense of universal jurisdiction, but rather because Constantinople (New Rome) was the ecumenical (i.e., imperial, capital) city. After the fall of the Roman Empire to Ottoman forces in 1453, the Archbishop of Constantinople continued to be referred to by the title of Ecumenical Patriarch, as a sign of respect for the ancient capital of Christendom. The general councils after this date, on the other hand, were no longer called Ecumenical, but rather Pan-Orthodox Councils.
However, in the modern use of the term, Ecumenism refers to the syncretistic movement seeking intercommunion between all Christian denominations, despite doctrinal differences. Under the false pretenses of “love” and “peace,” the Ecumenists even promote the union of Christianity with non-Christian religions. As a gesture of “love” the Ecumenists have forsaken the truth of Christ, forgetting that love without truth is false love. The fundamental belief of Ecumenism is that the whole truth does not exist in any single denomination or religion, but that all sects and cults contain a portion of the truth, and that the whole truth can only be found when all denominations, cults, sects and even religions unite. Since external unity cannot be achieved due to the sense of power each religion desires to retain, the Ecumenists have sought to form a union of all religions through compromising matters of the faith. Thereby all religions may keep their individual doctrines and traditions, but all should unite under the banner of a common belief in a divine power, whether this be God, Buddha or the numerous deities of Hinduism and other pagan faiths.

The modern Ecumenical Movement and its main vessel, the World Council of Churches (WCC), finds its origins in the fundamental beliefs of Freemasonry, a secretive cult promoting a New World Order with a united religion, a common market and a single universal government–that of Antichrist. For this reason, Traditionalist Orthodox Christians condemn Ecumenism as a Pan-heresy (a heresy embracing all heresies), and regard it to be the religion of Antichrist. The following articles expose the evils of Freemasonry and Ecumenism, and especially in regards to the modernists of “World Orthodoxy,” who have severed themselves from the Body of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Orthodox Church, due to their involvement in the Syncretistic New World Order of the Antichrist.

So, if the Orthodox are against Ecumenism, why is the Pope so bent on meeting and handing over bones from saints almost 600 years old?

[quote=katherine2]Thank you Holy Spirit for the Ecumencial Movement!
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[quote=CrusaderNY]Well then Sophia if you had all of these so called answers, then why did you start this string and ask the question?
[/quote]

I posted what I felt to be an item of interest providing a mini look at ecumenical relations. I had no question.

I am always glad to see these posts that keep us informed, or stimulate some of those sleepy neurons :yawn:

Whether the topic makes me happy, angry or sad I am better off learning.

Thanks

Michael

[So, if the Orthodox are against Ecumenism, why is the Pope so bent on meeting and handing over bones from saints almost 600 years old?]

Probably because he believes in one of the ten commandments which states -

‘Thou shall not steal’!

Orthodoc

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