ECUMENISM HAS LIMITS


#1

La Civillta Catyolica has published a recent article describing both the purposes and limits of true ecoumenism:

"…However, the Jesuit magazine emphasized, Christians cannot compromise on the understanding of Christ’s central role in the faith. The editorial denounces the perspective of some Christian theologians who suggest “that all religions are true, and all lead to God, in their various ways.” These theologians, Civilta Cattolica remarks, find it necessary to “demythologize” the claims of Christianity, including the claim that Christianity is the single true faith…The point of inter-religious dialogue, the Jesuit journal repeats, is to allow different religions to "make know the true nature of their beliefs, to undo the damages caused by prejudices and false interpretations that have emerged in the course of the centuries… "


#2

[quote=HagiaSophia]La Civillta Catyolica has published a recent article describing both the purposes and limits of true ecoumenism:

"…However, the Jesuit magazine emphasized, Christians cannot compromise on the understanding of Christ’s central role in the faith. The editorial denounces the perspective of some Christian theologians who suggest “that all religions are true, and all lead to God, in their various ways.” These theologians, Civilta Cattolica remarks, find it necessary to “demythologize” the claims of Christianity, including the claim that Christianity is the single true faith…The point of inter-religious dialogue, the Jesuit journal repeats, is to allow different religions to "make know the true nature of their beliefs, to undo the damages caused by prejudices and false interpretations that have emerged in the course of the centuries… "

cwnews.com/news/viewstory.cfm?recnum=30891
[/quote]

“I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father but through me.” – John 14:6


#3

[quote=HagiaSophia]La Civillta Catyolica has published a recent article describing both the purposes and limits of true ecoumenism:

"…However, the Jesuit magazine emphasized, Christians cannot compromise on the understanding of Christ’s central role in the faith. The editorial denounces the perspective of some Christian theologians who suggest “that all religions are true, and all lead to God, in their various ways.” These theologians, Civilta Cattolica remarks, find it necessary to “demythologize” the claims of Christianity, including the claim that Christianity is the single true faith…The point of inter-religious dialogue, the Jesuit journal repeats, is to allow different religions to "make know the true nature of their beliefs, to undo the damages caused by prejudices and false interpretations that have emerged in the course of the centuries… "

cwnews.com/news/viewstory.cfm?recnum=30891
[/quote]

I agree. A couple weeks ago I started a thread titled “ecumenism anyone?” I agree ecumenism can be a good tool to reach out an more clearly articulate our faith to others, but I disagree with those who think that to be ‘ecumenical’ we must water down the Faith or state that all faiths are equally valid…


#4

This article shows how subtle word changes can skew meaning. Other religions contain truth and may lead to God. They are not “true, and all lead to God, in their various ways”.

They also contain falsehood and may lead away from God.

Nuanced, liberalized gobbly-gook, not that I would resort to name calling.

I would be happy if demythologization would go the way of bell-bottom jeans. (And I don’t mean renaming them “flares”)


#5

Hi all…

**“Outside the Church there is no salvation” **

846 How are we to understand this affirmation, often repeated by the Church Fathers?335 Re-formulated positively, it means that all salvation comes from Christ the Head through the Church which is his Body:

Basing itself on Scripture and Tradition, the Council teaches that the Church, a pilgrim now on earth, is necessary for salvation: the one Christ is the mediator and the way of salvation; he is present to us in his body which is the Church. He himself explicitly asserted the necessity of faith and Baptism, and thereby affirmed at the same time the necessity of the Church which men enter through Baptism as through a door. Hence they could not be saved who, knowing that the Catholic Church was founded as necessary by God through Christ, would refuse either to enter it or to remain in it.336

847 This affirmation is not aimed at those who, through no fault of their own, do not know Christ and his Church:

Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or his Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and, moved by grace, try in their actions to do his will as they know it through the dictates of their conscience - those too may achieve eternal salvation.337
848 "Although in ways known to himself God can lead those who, through no fault of their own, are ignorant of the Gospel, to that faith without which it is impossible to please him, the Church still has the obligation and also the sacred right to evangelize all men."338

Peace,
Scott


#6

[quote=pnewton]I would be happy if demythologization would go the way of bell-bottom jeans. (And I don’t mean renaming them “flares”)
[/quote]

LOL - no chance of that however, it’s the new “tool” of some who have a specific agenda to “bend and twist” whatever is written to fit their purpose.


#7

That they may all be one!
If you wanna know the true boundaries then I suggest you read
Ut Unum Sint! by Pope John Paul II. Excellent stuff.

I used it to refute false ecumenism going on within our Parish and have yet to have a reply against it!!!:wink:

Fergal
Naas
Ireland


#8

[quote=Fergal]That they may all be one!
If you wanna know the true boundaries then I suggest you read
Ut Unum Sint! by Pope John Paul II. Excellent stuff.

I used it to refute false ecumenism going on within our Parish and have yet to have a reply against it!!!:wink:
[/quote]

Glad it worked out for you.

However we have come a long, long way since the initial document was issued; liike all documents HOW a thing is implemented and/or interpreted is being questioned by some.

If you read the article you will see that it takes to task some “advanced” ideas being promoted by certain thologians with regard to the HOW…


#9

I remember one point from the book Ecumenical Jihd and that is that we often find more commonality with solid Christians of other denominations than our own far-flung theologians.

I remember struggling with those who de-mythologized the Bible in the late 1970’s-1980’s in college (Houston Bapttist Univ) and finally realized that some of them had an underlying scepticism in anything supernatural. Many of my classmates had the same frustration but, fortunately, we also had some solid conservative professors. We mostly managed to escape without being completely corrupted.


#10

I downloaded this from a Christian bulletin board on Delphi about a dozen years ago. I though it would be appropriate to post it here…

Like a Mighty Turtle, Moves the Church of God


[left] [/left]
[left]During an ecumenical gathering, someone rushed in and shouted, “I smell smoke.”[/left]

“Fire, Fire”, cried the Pentecostals.

“Water, Water”, responded the Baptists.

“Every man for himself”, shouted the Congregationalists.

The Quakers prayed silently for the blessings that fire brings.

The Christian Scientists declared that fire existed only in the
people’s minds.

The United Methodists planned a three day conference to chart a plan of action.

The Lutherans wrote a treatise to post on the door condemning the wrong use of fire.

The Episcopalians designed a liturgy for the dedication of a fire.

The Roman Catholics appealed to Rome for the Holy Father’s guidance on the church’s teaching concerning fire.

The Presbyterians moved that a moderator appoint a task force to study the issue of fire and that they write a report to be submitted at the next meeting.

And the fundamentalist said, " Don’t worry, its just a Southern Baptist having a cigarette." :stuck_out_tongue:


#11

HAGIA

I agree with your post. And I thnk we always need to bear in mind the concept of Ecumenism as it pertains to other Christians or Orther Religions entirely. I think the absolute #1 priority is Ecumenism with the Orthodox. I have stated this over and over because it is the truth and a personal passion of mine which I pray about nightly. I think after that we should also continue dialogues with the other Christian sects. But theologically, I don’t think there’s much room to agree upon.

RNR,

That joke was hillarious:rotfl:

I’ll add, “The Orthodox began to dispute whose territory the fire belonged to, then broke away to light their own fires.”


#12

[quote=Salvo] I think the absolute #1 priority is Ecumenism with the Orthodox.
[/quote]

I believe that the Orthodox and the Anglicans stand the closest and have come the furthest since the whole ecumenical movement began to show on the surface of church life during council. It is with them that I believe confluence will happen first.

[quote=Salvo] I think after that we should also continue dialogues with the other Christian sects. But theologically, I don’t think there’s much room to agree upon.
[/quote]

I believe theologically we will have a great deal of difficulty with some of the Protestant churches who have “preaching” but very little theology. And then you have the Ian Paisley’s of the world…

However I try to keep in mind that God does write the story of our lives with some very crooked lines and one never knows, just never knows. If anyone had told me I’d live through this time, I wouldna’ believed it.

An I think back to that time historically when one could die for having the wrong tonsure, for saying Easter instead of Pascha… we’ve come a long, long way.


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