EDITED: Can a non-Catholic receive Anointing of the Sick?


#1

Hi,

Can a non-Catholic receive Anointing of the Sick if he lives in a nursing home, but is still able to process some faith based questions? I was thinking of taking my friend to a healing Mass. He just wouldn’t be able to receive communion, right? Maybe a case by case situation, and depends on the judgment of the Priest?

Then, if my friend receives Anointing of the Sick, then why not communion on the same day? If it isn’t the rule, but an exception, maybe it is okay one time, since he is sick? I think he might have received communion in the past in the Catholic Church, but recently hasn’t. I might have recently told him not to receive communion. In the past, i would just tell him to pray about it and do what God puts on his heart, which i know isn’t the Catholic teaching. I wasn’t convicted about Catholic teaching on Holy Communion yet.

I do know there are exceptions, but we cannot make exceptions the rule.

I believe that he is a baptized Protestant / non-Catholic Christian, but hasn’t made a decision to become Catholic.

God Bless You,
Brian


#2

The following will help answer your questions.
mariancatechist.com/spiritual_reading/anointing_non-catholics.html

**The Sacrament of Anointing is primarily but not exclusively employed in those situations and circumstances that may lead to the death of a person. Due to this proximity to the possibility of death, the Church provides a generous latitude for the Sacrament’s conferral on those who are gravely sick and injured and almost certain to die. However, this generosity cannot be misconstrued to mean that the Church embraces a casual or indiscriminating attitude in the administration of the Sacrament. There are some Catholics (and perhaps, catechists) who incorrectly believe that the Sacrament of Anointing can and should be given to any baptized person (Catholic or not) who is sick or injured, including those who have grown fragile due to advanced years.

It is true that every baptized person is able to validly receive the Sacrament of Anointing; however, because something is possible does not make it necessary or even desirable. It is for this reason that in the administration of the sacraments the Church not only requires that they be validly received but lawfully administered as well. Determining the lawful administration of the sacraments requires knowledge of the Church’s canons (laws) that regulate this administration.

For a proper understanding of the lawful administration of the Anointing of the Sick, a study of Canons 1004-1007, 842 and 844 is necessary. Canon 844, which sets forth various conditions which must be present in order for a Catholic priest to lawfully administrate the Sacraments of Anointing, Penance and the Holy Eucharist to a member of the faithful who is not Catholic is particularly noteworthy.

Prudent discrimination is required on the part of the Catholic priest when he is called to administer the Sacrament of Anointing. Some of the conditions that are to be considered before administering the Sacrament are: is this person truly infirm, has this person reached the age of reason, are they truly repentant of any manifestly grave sin they have committed, are they in fact alive. In any situation where the answer to these questions is in the negative, the priest cannot lawfully administer the Sacrament. (It must be noted that, if there is doubt as to whether or not a person is alive or dead, the Sacrament of Anointing should be administered.)

In the situation of a non-Catholic member of the faithful, the above conditions are in play along with a number of others that are set forth in Canon 844. This canon which should be read from beginning to end by all catechists states that if there is a danger of death or if, in the judgment of the diocesan bishop or the Bishop’s Conference, there is some other grave and pressing need, a Catholic priest could validly and lawfully administer to a non-Catholic who cannot approach a minister of their own community and who spontaneously asks for the Sacrament. Also they must be able to demonstrate the Catholic Faith in respect to the Sacrament of Anointing and must be properly disposed to receiving it. These conditions are not casual or what would be considered ordinary. They are rare and unusual. This is important to understand less we inadvertently encourage the notion in our catechesis that a non-Catholic is to approach a Catholic priest for this Sacrament as would a Catholic.

For a catechist to desire for a non-Catholic to receive the Sacrament of Anointing is commendable and understandable, especially with it being positioned, in the majority of situations and circumstances, close to the eventuality of a person leaving this world and appearing before Christ as their judge. The Sacrament of Anointing is the very best preparation in which to participate before our particular judgment. Nevertheless, the best expression of this desire is to assist our non-Catholic brothers and sisters into full communion through a profession of faith, and reception of the Sacraments of Confirmation and Holy Communion.

Canons referenced for the valid reception and the lawful administration of the Sacrament of Anointing. Taken from: Code of Canon Law Annotated, (Woodridge, IL: Midwest Theological Forum, 2004).

“Member of the faithful” refers to a baptized Catholic.

“Catholic minister” refers to a Catholic priest.

("A baptized non-Catholic, must meet the conditions of Canon 844 §4 for the lawful administration of the Sacrament of Anointing.") **


#3

Catholic Canon 844 intratext.com/IXT/ENG0017/_P2S.HTM

Can. 844 §1 Catholic ministers may lawfully administer the sacraments only to catholic members of Christ's faithful, who equally may lawfully receive them only from catholic ministers, except as provided in §§2, 3 and 4 of this canon and in can. 861 §2.

§2 Whenever necessity requires or a genuine spiritual advantage commends it, and provided the danger of error or indifferentism is avoided, Christ's faithful for whom it is physically or morally impossible to approach a catholic minister, may lawfully receive the sacraments of penance, the Eucharist and anointing of the sick from non-catholic ministers in whose Churches these sacraments are valid.

§3 Catholic ministers may lawfully administer the sacraments of penance, the Eucharist and anointing of the sick to members of the eastern Churches not in full communion with the catholic Church, if they spontaneously ask for them and are properly disposed. The same applies to members of other Churches which the Apostolic See judges to be in the same position as the aforesaid eastern Churches so far as the sacraments are concerned.

§4 If there is a danger of death or if, in the judgement of the diocesan Bishop or of the Episcopal Conference, there is some other grave and pressing need, catholic ministers may lawfully administer these same sacraments to other christians not in full communion with the catholic Church, who cannot approach a minister of their own community and who spontaneously ask for them, provided that they demonstrate the catholic faith in respect of these sacraments and are properly disposed.

§5 In respect of the cases dealt with in §§2, 3 and 4, the diocesan Bishop or the Episcopal Conference is not to issue general norms except after consultation with the competent authority, at least at the local level, of the non-catholic Church or community concerned.


#4

tl;dr: There must be imminent danger of death for your friend, and he still must exhibit the Catholic faith. If there is not danger of death, then your friend should be encouraged to enter the Catholic Church so as to be ordinarily worthy of all the sacraments. If your friend holds the Catholic faith anyway, why not?


#5

[quote="Elizium23, post:4, topic:311238"]
tl;dr: There must be imminent danger of death for your friend...

[/quote]

Hold on, what you quoted states that it can either be imminent danger of death or at least some grave or pressing need. If his friend is ill enough -- and of course professes the accurate belief -- he can still receive the Anointing regardless of imminent danger of death.


#6

[quote="WoundedIcon, post:5, topic:311238"]
Hold on, what you quoted states that it can either be imminent danger of death or at least some grave or pressing need. If his friend is ill enough -- and of course professes the accurate belief -- he can still receive the Anointing regardless of imminent danger of death.

[/quote]

Yes, but that "grave or pressing need" must be determined by the Diocesan Bishop or the Episcopal Conference, so you would have to go through proper channels. A grave need is, FYI, the highest bar of qualification in Canon Law, therefore the standard is much higher than, e.g. a "just reason", and there is no "priest shopping" that will find you someone able to licitly administer it.

Good luck with a random non-Catholic friend appealing to the bishop for his need of a Catholic sacrament. I have a feeling it would be denied as a matter of routine unless your situation was indeed exceptional.


#7

I'm in RCIA and twice have attended our parish's monthly healing mass and have been annointed. Fr. Jerry has done some really good teaching about how it's not just a sacrament "in preparation for death" like it used to be. The week before the mass, he will invite anyone or anyone they know to come for physical, spiritual, psychological or emotional healing. The first one I went to (at this church, I've been to many in the church I come from), afterwards, I prayed for "healing in something I didn't even know was a hurt" and it certainly has been a ride.


#8

I have been on healing retreats where I think they anoint everyone with the sacrament, non-Catholics included. I think they are aware not everyone is Catholic. I need to email the director to find out more. I wonder if this is against Church teaching… It seems the Priests who do this must be administering the Sacrament of the Anointing of the sick improperly or they are truly not aware of non-Catholics receiving it? God Bless You! Brian


#9

Thank you for the post. A lot to read and haven’t read it all. So it seems there are a lot of Priests wrongly administering the sacrament of anointing of the sick? I have been to retreats where they do this for everyone, even non-Catholics. I need to email the director. God Bless You. Brian


#10

[quote="GodHeals, post:1, topic:311238"]
Hi,

Can a non-Catholic receive Anointing of the Sick if he lives in a nursing home, but is still able to process some faith based questions? I was thinking of taking my friend to a healing Mass. He just wouldn't be able to receive communion, right? Maybe a case by case situation, and depends on the judgment of the Priest?

Then, if my friend receives Anointing of the Sick, then why not communion on the same day? If it isn't the rule, but an exception, maybe it is okay one time, since he is sick? I think he might have received communion in the past in the Catholic Church, but recently hasn't. I might have recently told him not to receive communion. In the past, i would just tell him to pray about it and do what God puts on his heart, which i know isn't the Catholic teaching. I wasn't convicted about Catholic teaching on Holy Communion yet.

I do know there are exceptions, but we cannot make exceptions the rule.

I believe that he is a baptized Protestant / non-Catholic Christian, but hasn't made a decision to become Catholic.

God Bless You,
Brian

[/quote]


#11

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You have tobe baptised to receive any sacrament; therefore, this sacrament is reserved for Catholics.

You cannot receive Communion because you are not entitled to do so. Giving communion to you would be like a mockery. You have had no classes onn this sacrament and by receiving it it would be illicit and invalid.

God bless you.


#12

[quote="St_Hilary, post:11, topic:311238"]
[LIST=1]
[/LIST]

You have tobe baptised to receive any sacrament; therefore, this sacrament is reserved for Catholics.

[/quote]

Catholics aren't the only ones with a valid baptism.

This whole thread is something to drive non-Catholics to be suspect of Catholicism. Someone is dying or very ill and you have to have permission to be anointed by another Christian - a Catholic priest?


#13

[quote="ladylove, post:12, topic:311238"]
Catholics aren't the only ones with a valid baptism.

This whole thread is something to drive non-Catholics to be suspect of Catholicism. Someone is dying or very ill and you have to have permission to be anointed by another Christian - a Catholic priest?

[/quote]

What is so suspect? Catholic sacraments are reserved for the Catholic faithful. There are exceptions but there is a high standard for the exception to be met and permission to be given. The sacraments impart grace according to our oneness of faith and by the ministry of the Church. If you want to receive Catholic sacraments and you hold the Catholic faith, then just come along and become Catholic?


#14

When Jesus healed the Jews who placed their faith in Him as the Messiah, he didn’t ask if they were Catholic. Of course, even before the official Church beginning?? at Pentecost with the Holy Spirit filling the people (The Apostles already had the Holy Spirit?), Jesus had in mind ONE church.

Would Jesus heal those who are sick without them being Catholic and would this be different than the Anointing of the Sick? I know there is the gift of healing.

The same logic I guess could be used for the other sacraments, including the Eucharist, calling all people to receive Him, but that is another topic. I am not saying that I agree all people should receive the Eucharist and eat condemnation on their souls, but seek to agree with the Catholic Church.

Thanks!


#15

[quote="GodHeals, post:14, topic:311238"]
When Jesus healed the Jews who placed their faith in Him as the Messiah, he didn't ask if they were Catholic. Of course, even before the official Church beginning?? at Pentecost with the Holy Spirit filling the people (The Apostles already had the Holy Spirit?), Jesus had in mind ONE church.

[/quote]

I suspect, Jesus may have been God. God is not bound by the Sacraments and may heal anyone at will.

[quote="GodHeals, post:14, topic:311238"]
Would Jesus heal those who are sick without them being Catholic and would this be different than the Anointing of the Sick? I know there is the gift of healing.

[/quote]

Jesus was not around when the Catholic Church began. He had returned to heaven a month before.

Jesus pointed us to what was to become a sacrament. He also healed by making mud with spit. This is not used to heal, the Church determined that, even though Jesus did this, his priests were not to do it.

If someone wants to receive Catholic sacraments, the Church is open to all people. Anyone can join and receive. But if someone will not join the Church, pearls are not to be cast before swine. Sacraments are not to be given to the unrepentant.


#16

Thank you, Evan. I do wonder if there is a difference between THE ANOINTING OF THE SICK and the HEALING that Jesus did? Or if they are the same healing. Not sure if that makes sense. Thanks!


#17

[quote="GodHeals, post:1, topic:311238"]
Hi,

Can a non-Catholic receive Anointing of the Sick if he lives in a nursing home, but is still able to process some faith based questions? I was thinking of taking my friend to a healing Mass. He just wouldn't be able to receive communion, right? Maybe a case by case situation, and depends on the judgment of the Priest?

[/quote]

Canon law permits this in the case of the Orthodox, the PNCC, the "Old Catholics" of the Utrecht Union and certain other groups. (CIC Canon 844*§3)

Can. 844
§1. Catholic ministers administer the sacraments licitly to Catholic members of the Christian faithful alone, who likewise receive them licitly from Catholic ministers alone, without prejudice to the prescripts of §§2, 3, and 4 of this canon, and ⇒ can. 861, §2.

§2. Whenever necessity requires it or true spiritual advantage suggests it, and provided that danger of error or of indifferentism is avoided, the Christian faithful for whom it is physically or morally impossible to approach a Catholic minister are permitted to receive the sacraments of penance, Eucharist, and anointing of the sick from non-

Catholic ministers in whose Churches these sacraments are valid.

§3. Catholic ministers administer the sacraments of penance, Eucharist, and anointing of the sick licitly to members of Eastern Churches which do not have full communion with the Catholic Church if they seek such on their own accord and are properly disposed. This is also valid for members of other Churches which in the judgment of the Apostolic See are in the same condition in regard to the sacraments as these Eastern Churches.

§4. If the danger of death is present or if, in the judgment of the diocesan bishop or conference of bishops, some other grave necessity urges it, Catholic ministers administer these same sacraments licitly also to other Christians not having full communion with the Catholic Church, who cannot approach a minister of their own community and who seek such on their own accord, provided that they manifest Catholic faith in respect to these sacraments and are properly disposed.

§5. For the cases mentioned in §§2, 3, and 4, the diocesan bishop or conference of bishops is not to issue general norms except after consultation at least with the local competent authority of the interested non-Catholic Church or community.

Note §4... If your friend is in danger of death, and understands the annointing of the sick to be a genuine sacrament, and has no minister of his own church coming to him...

... that's a lot of "if"...

then yes.


#18

Thank you for sharing. What does “Ruthenianized” mean?


#19

[quote="GodHeals, post:18, topic:311238"]
Thank you for sharing. What does "Ruthenianized" mean?

[/quote]

I've given my letter requesting change of canonical ascription from the Roman Church to the Ruthenian Church. Still Catholic, still in communion with Rome, but a different liturgical and cultural expression of the Catholic Faith. Really, tho', that's a question best handled in the Eastern Catholics subforum.


#20

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