EDITED: Changes to the Act of Contrition?

#1

In the Act of Contrition when and how did the ending resolve to avoid the near occasion of sin start replacing the resolve to sin no more?

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#2

There are many, many variations on the Act of Contrition – just Google it. If the wording in some versions has changed to “resolve to sin no more” it’s probably because people don’t know what a “near occasion of sin” is and prefer wording they understand.

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#3

Nothing was replaced. The act of contrition in my wallet right now reads,

I firmly intend, with your help,
To do penance,
To sin no more,
And to avoid whatever leads me to sin.

Get a better act of contrition, that’s all.

-Tim-

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#4

There are yes “acts of contrition” that are written and published etc. But do note that one can even come up with ones own.

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#5

I quess I’m a lot older. I was taught the ending:

I firmly resolve with the help of Thy grace, to confess my sins, to do penance, and to amend my life. Amen.

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#6

Compendium issued by Pope Benedict XVI

Act of Contrition

O my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended Thee, and I detest all my sins because of thy just punishments, but most of all because they offend Thee, my God, who art all good and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve with the help of Thy grace to sin no more and to avoid the near occasion of sin. Amen.

Actus contritionis

Deus meus, ex toto corde pænitet me ómnium meórum peccatórum, éaque detéstor, quia peccándo, non solum pœnas a te iuste statútas proméritus sum, sed præsértim quia offéndi te, summum bonum, ac dignum qui super ómnia diligáris. Ídeo fírmiter propóno, adiuvánte grátia tua, de cétero me non peccatúrum peccandíque occasiónes próximas fugitúrum. Amen.

vatican.va/archive/compendium_ccc/documents/archive_2005_compendium-ccc_en.html

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#7

Whereas the version I’m used to is:

O my God, I am sorry for my sins with all my heart. In choosing to do wrong and failing to do good, I have sinned against you whom I should love above all things. I firmly intend, with your help, to do penance, to sin no more, and to avoid whatever leads me to sins. Our Savior Jesus Christ suffered and died for us. In his name, my God, have mercy. Amen.

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#8

Mine was the same (circa 1964) with the exception of
" who art all good, and worthy of all my love".

I’ve been teaching Sacramental Prep for years, and the published versions that come in the children’s textbooks form **approved publishers **have changed no fewer than 4 times.
I lose track. I still say mine the same.,…but as someone else posted…the Sacrament calls for a statement of contrition. If a penitent does not know the local “official prayer” they may simply make their own heartfelt statement.
I have found that the newer version(s) seem to be easier for the children to memorize.

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#9

"Oh, my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended you, and I detest all my sins because I dread the loss of heaven and the pains of hell; but, most of all, because they offend you, my God, who are all Good and deserving of ALL my love. I firmly resolve, with the help of your grace, to confess my sins, to do penance, and to amend my life. Amen. That’s the way I learned it, and I have only changed “thee” and “thy” to “you” and “your.”

What I have learned in my 70 plus years is that there is no one proper way to make an act of contrition.

The main thing is to express our contrition and our resolve to stop sinning.

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#10

THIS ^ :thumbsup:

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#11

I use the one Bookcat posted above in English!

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#12

The Council of Trent said in session XIV that “Contrition, which holds the first place among the aforesaid acts of the penitent, is a sorrow of mind and a detestation for sin committed with the purpose of not sinning in the future.” (The translation is from The Canons and Decrees of the Council of Trent translated by Rev. H.J. Schroeder, O.P.) I guess I’ll use resolve to sin no more instead of resolve to avoid the near occasion of sin in my next confession

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#13

forums.catholic.com/showpost.php?p=11704677&postcount=6

It is not an either- or.

Compendium issued by Pope Benedict XVI

Act of Contrition

O my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended Thee, and I detest all my sins because of thy just punishments, but most of all because they offend Thee, my God, who art all good and deserving of all my love.* I firmly resolve with the help of Thy grace to sin no more and to avoid the near occasion of sin.* Amen.

And one may express ones contrition in a formula one finds written -or in ones words --or words from Scripture…etc.

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#14

This is how I was taught. But then it started not to make any sense to say “I firmly resolve…to confess my sins” when I had just confessed them! I like the newer endings which eliminate the “to confess my sins” because it makes more sense.

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#15

From the Baltimore Catechism, yet another ending.An Act of Contrition.
O my God! I am heartily sorry for having offended Thee, and I detest all my sins, because I dread the loss of heaven and the pains of hell; but most of all because they offend Thee, my God, who art allgood and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve, with the help of Thy grace, to confess my sins, to do penance, and to amend my life.
From the new rite for the Sacrament of Penance from 1974, one may use this short prayer for the act of contrition:
“Lord Jesus, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.” ewtn.com/library/CURIA/CDWFORMA.HTM

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#16

:amen:

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#17

I learned this version in the U.K.

Thanks for the Latin.

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#18

Me too.

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#19

And a Byzantine version:

For these and all my other sins which I remember or cannot call to mind, I am very sorry. I have offended God and have angered Him against me. I am sincerely repentant and promise with the help of God to better my life. For this, I humbly ask of you, Father, salutary penance and absolution.

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#20

I think I jumble a bunch of these together when I go. :blush: But a person can make their very own and that’s OK. The important thing is to express contrition and a desire to do better. One time, during a particularly difficult confession, the priest asked me to make my Act of Contrition and I found that my mind was totally blank! I asked the priest for help since there were no “cheat sheets” in the confessional, and he asked me:

“Are you sorry for your sins?”

Me: “Yes.”

Priest: “Are you going to try to stop doing them?”

Me: “Yes.”

Priest: “There you go - there’s your Act of Contrition.”

(In this case I was confessing sins related to perfectionism, scrupulous tendencies - so I think he wanted to make sure that I understood that being forgiven and absolved was not just a matter of me reciting prayers perfectly.)

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