EDITED: Priest acts "in persona Christi" (in the person of Christ) when blessing?


#1

When a priest blesses a person or an object, is it true that they are performing the blessing ** In persona Christi **(in the person of Christ) ?

Thanks and God Bless.


#2

Yes. And, as a matter of fact, Eucharistic Ministers, at parishes that invite those not in full communion with the Church, or not in the state of grace to come through the line for a blessing, SHOULD NOT make the sign of the cross over the person, that is a function reserved for the ordained, and not the laity.

Peace and all good.


#3

Thanks, thats what I thought :thumbsup:

God Bless.


#4

[quote="Don_Jackson, post:2, topic:296867"]
Yes. And, as a matter of fact, Eucharistic Ministers, at parishes that invite those not in full communion with the Church, or not in the state of grace to come through the line for a blessing, SHOULD NOT make the sign of the cross over the person, that is a function reserved for the ordained, and not the laity.

Peace and all good.

[/quote]

Do you have a source? My understanding is that Persona Christi applies with the usage of the term "I" and "My". "I absolve you", "This is My body".

The blessing does not begin with I bless you, but "May Almighty God bless you in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit


#5

The Priestly Blessing.

Numbers 6:22-27
The LORD said to Moses:
Speak to Aaron and his sons and tell them: This is how you shall bless the Israelites. Say to them:
The LORD bless you and keep you!
The LORD let his face shine upon you, and be gracious to you!
The LORD look upon you kindly and give you peace.
**So shall they invoke my name upon the Israelites, and I will bless them. **

This blessing was to be bestowed by Moses, Aaron and his sons (priests) and God promised He Himself would bless them through their invocation. With our ordained priests today bestowing blessings in the Lord’s name, I believe they are just as valid, if not more so! I look forward to this at the end of Mass and have always believed God is present in the blessing.


#6

No. They are acting as priests who are given the right to bless by the Chuch in behalf of the Church.


#7

Hmm… is this strictly true? I thought it was licit and valid for parents to bless their children…


#8

You can do it!

CCC 669 Sacramentals derive from the baptismal priesthood: every baptized person is called to be a “blessing,” and to bless.172 Hence lay people may preside at certain blessings; the more a blessing concerns ecclesial and sacramental life, the more is its administration reserved to the ordained ministry (bishops, priests, or deacons).173


#9

What is the difference between a priest blessing a person, and a layman blessing a person?

When exactly is **In persona Christi ** used? It what situations?


#10

There is a thread on the ask an apologetic, from Father Serpa…I was surprised.


#11

Could you please provide the link for the thread, as you have already found it?

And why were you surprised?


#12

[quote="A_G, post:9, topic:296867"]
What is the difference between a priest blessing a person, and a layman blessing a person?

When exactly is *In persona Christi * used? It what situations?

[/quote]

First of all you have to ask what is a priest in the entire context of history as seen in the Bible. Priests are those who offer sacrifices to God. Since Christ, there are no other priests but Christ. That is why we say priests act in persona Christi, because only Christ is the priest today thus they have to act in the person of Christ or otherwise they by themselves cannot offer the sacrifice of bread and wine.

Blessing is not a function of the priest. Through the presbyters and bishops today impart blessings not because of their priesthood, but because of their position in the Church where they have the authority to impart the blessing of God from the Church through them.


#13

Well, yes… lay people may preside at some blessings; but even so, the text differs – especially in the context of the blessing itself, which is the context we’re talking about here, right?

As an example, take a look at the blessing of the sick. An ordained minister (priest or deacon) concludes the blessing with “May almighty God bless you all, the Father, and the Son, ✠ and the Holy Spirit.” A lay minister concludes with “May the Lord Jesus Christ, who went about doing good and healing the sick, grant that we may have good health and be enriched by his blessings.”

So, although a lay person may preside at this blessing, the actual blessing itself is vastly different than that of an ordained minister; among the differences, of course, is the gesture of the cross over those participating in the blessing!

In any case, I was trying to ask something different – it was my understanding that a parent may validly bless his/her children (in the sense of “the Father, and the Son, ✠ and the Holy Spirit”), so that it was my understanding that it wasn’t just ordained ministers who could bless in this way, strictly speaking.


#14

Heck, we can even bless the Lord. :stuck_out_tongue: “Bless the Lord, O my soul . . .”

So can creation, as we pray from the first Sunday morning of the week in LOTH.

“Bless the Lord all you works of the Lord,”
. . . and we then name sun and moon, stars of heaven, winds, fire and heat, cold and chill, etc., bless the Lord! From Daniel 3:57-88

We bless one another whenever we sneeze.

So many blessings — we are indeed blessed! :wink:

Context is everything.


#15

I found two…just search Ask and apologetic with key words sign of the cross…

Even Fr. Serpa seems to be all over the place on this one.

In one post he said it was quite appropriate (the answer I wanted to hear), in another he said something I thought was really silly…something about you can make the sign of the cross with your thumb as long as it does not look like a priest’s blessing(?).

The one I had read several months ago, (I couldn’t find it in my latest search), I remember him saying you can bless someone, but only the priest can make the sign of the cross over a person when being blessed.

I was surprised, in that, as far as I am concerned, there are far worse things a person can do than to bless someone and make the sign of the cross over them, if it is done in charity.

But I defer to the authority of the church, and the good Father can speak for that…this humble sinner cannot!

Peace and all good!


#16

Objects that lay people can bless include from Book of Blessings, Liturgical Press, Minnesota, 1989:

A new home (n. 661),
Various means of transportation (n. 854),
Boats and fishing gear (n. 880),
Technical installations or equipment (n. 901),
Tools and other equipment for work (n. 921),
Animals (n. 943),
Fields and flocks (n. 968),
Seeds at planting time (n. 988),
Thanksgiving for the harvest (n. 1008),
Blessing before meals (n. 1033).


#17

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