Elevation of the Host/Ringing of bell


#1

According to my St. Joseph Missal, published before 1967, the faithful are supposed to adore the Host when the priest elevates it, and say to themselves, "My Lord and My God." I'm only guessing that the ringing of the bell is something of an aid in this? If so, why do so many people in a Novus Ordo mass go to the extent of *averting *their eyes during the elevation? They look down instead of gazing up at the Host? Is this done out of ignorance, or is it one of those things that people are now in the habit of deciding for themselves?


#2

[quote="malkad, post:1, topic:348373"]
According to my St. Joseph Missal, published before 1967, the faithful are supposed to adore the Host when the priest elevates it, and say to themselves, "My Lord and My God." I'm only guessing that the ringing of the bell is something of an aid in this? If so, why do so many people in a Novus Ordo mass go to the extent of *averting *their eyes during the elevation? They look down instead of gazing up at the Host? Is this done out of ignorance, or is it one of those things that people are now in the habit of deciding for themselves?

[/quote]

I'm confused. Why do you avert your eyes from gazing up at the Host to look at others?:hmmm:


#3

[quote="TheDoctor, post:2, topic:348373"]
I'm confused. Why do you avert your eyes from gazing up at the Host to look at others?:hmmm:

[/quote]

:thumbsup: good question.


#4

I tend to bow down while the host is elevated as a great form of respect. I try really hard not to, but bowing seems more reverent for me (not judging anyone else on what they do, just for me, it does).


#5

I haven't heard the ringing of bells in some time. I miss that. What does it say in your pre-1967 missal that you are quoting that we the laity are to do at the time you are speaking of...?


#6

Who knows why people do what they do. Some look, some bow their head, I am sure some are not really paying attention. I know all this, because there are times when I am watching what other people are doing and not paying good enough attention at the elevation of the host. I get sidetracked in my own mind and it wanders sometimes. I usually catch myself pretty quickly when I realize I am not showing enough respect and am quick to apologize to our Lord :o I, for the most part, do say "My Lord and My God" at the elevation of The host. When I remember to. Sometimes I just gaze and contemplate the mystery of The True presence.

As for the ringing of the bell... When I was in RCIA, our parish Deacon told us (I don't remember exactly what he said) that when the Jewish priests use to go into the temple for some ritual or ceremony or something that they use to wear bells on legs so that when they walked, the bells would ring. That would signify that The presence of God was there. So, I am guessing he meant that when we ring the bell, it means "The presence of The Lord is here" Now, I do not remember what our Deacon told us word for word, so if this is wrong in any part, it is probably because remembered something differently from what I was told.


#7

Don't have a pre-1967 Missal, but the way I was taught was to gaze at the Host & say a brief prayer: i.e., "my Lord & My God", I personally usually say (silently) "my Jesus, I love You". I also bow at the same time that the Priest genuflects after lowering both the Host and the Chalice, because this is what I was taught to do. I do remember reading in a Missal a couple of years ago, that we should bow, or if kneeling, bow our heads when the Priest genuflects after lowering both the Host and the Chalice. I am unable to kneel, due to a crippled leg, so I bow when the Priest genuflects. We do have the bells, and I think (personally -- don't know the original reason) that the bells are to draw our attention to the Presence now upon the Altar and the holiness and sanctity of the moment.


#8

[quote="malkad, post:1, topic:348373"]
According to my St. Joseph Missal, published before 1967, the faithful are supposed to adore the Host when the priest elevates it, and say to themselves, "My Lord and My God." I'm only guessing that the ringing of the bell is something of an aid in this? If so, why do so many people in a Novus Ordo mass go to the extent of *averting *their eyes during the elevation? They look down instead of gazing up at the Host? Is this done out of ignorance, or is it one of those things that people are now in the habit of deciding for themselves?

[/quote]

I am old school- I still say "Holy Ghost" in my prayers. I received my First Communion in 1942 and went to Parochial School in a Jesuit Parish.
I was taught to say "My Lord and My God" while beating my breast with a closed fist, just like you do at the "through my fault" in the Confiteor. We were also taught to avert our eyes from the raised Host because as sinners, we were worthy enough to gaze upon the body of Christ.
All I can add is that old habits die hard.


#9

Personally, I cross myself when the Host and the Cup are raised, but it's a personal thing (while silently saying "My Lord and my God"). I think the statement of "My Lord and my God" is especially useful to help people understand that, somehow, miraculously, the bread and wine DO become Jesus - though our bodies can't tell the difference.


#10

I really don’t think any of this is that big of a deal. Saying “my Lord and my God” quietly during the elevation is a pious practice and it’s hard for me to see how that could be wrong. But looking/not looking, :shrug:. I generally lean my head on the back of the pew in front of me while the EP/Canon is being prayed, and usually I do look up for the elevation. No big deal.


#11

[quote="George_Stegmeir, post:8, topic:348373"]
I am old school- I still say "Holy Ghost" in my prayers. I received my First Communion in 1942 and went to Parochial School in a Jesuit Parish.
I was taught to say "My Lord and My God" while beating my breast with a closed fist, just like you do at the "through my fault" in the Confiteor. We were also taught to avert our eyes from the raised Host because as sinners, we were worthy enough to gaze upon the body of Christ.
All I can add is that old habits die hard.

[/quote]

That's awesome, as a retired military guy, I appreciate the "do as you're told and keep your mouth shut" mentality. It will all get worked out over time and then we die, problem solved. No need to debate or think, just do.

I for one would like to see our Priests being more directive and telling us what to do, we don't know... as someone without your background we have no idea what to do because no one tells us because they are too wishy washy. Just tell us and we'll do it. Right?


#12

I don't ever intentionally avert my eyes from the host, but I do intentionally bow before my Lord. I also try to look up at Him and adore, but occasionally I only have time for one, not the other. When bowing in worship, my eyes are down. I would guess that this is what the people you observe are doing.


#13

[quote="ThyKingdomCome, post:12, topic:348373"]
I don't ever intentionally avert my eyes from the host, but I do intentionally bow before my Lord. I also try to look up at Him and adore, but occasionally I only have time for one, not the other. When bowing in worship, my eyes are down. I would guess that this is what the people you observe are doing.

[/quote]

:thumbsup:

There are also some of us old enough to have been taught to bow at the mention of the Lord's name. So, when saying the short prayer (silently) of "My Jesus, mercy" that I was taught for the elevation of the host, it is very hard not to bow. :)


#14

[quote="TheDoctor, post:2, topic:348373"]
I'm confused. Why do you avert your eyes from gazing up at the Host to look at others?:hmmm:

[/quote]

Most people don't wear blinders to mass, so it is actually possible to adore the elevated Host and notice that others are averting their eyes.


#15

[quote="LaughingBoy1503, post:6, topic:348373"]
Who knows why people do what they do. Some look, some bow their head, I am sure some are not really paying attention. I know all this, because there are times when I am watching what other people are doing and not paying good enough attention at the elevation of the host. I get sidetracked in my own mind and it wanders sometimes. I usually catch myself pretty quickly when I realize I am not showing enough respect and am quick to apologize to our Lord :o I, for the most part, do say "My Lord and My God" at the elevation of The host. When I remember to. Sometimes I just gaze and contemplate the mystery of The True presence.

As for the ringing of the bell... When I was in RCIA, our parish Deacon told us (I don't remember exactly what he said) that when the Jewish priests use to go into the temple for some ritual or ceremony or something that they use to wear bells on legs so that when they walked, the bells would ring. That would signify that The presence of God was there. So, I am guessing he meant that when we ring the bell, it means "The presence of The Lord is here" Now, I do not remember what our Deacon told us word for word, so if this is wrong in any part, it is probably because remembered something differently from what I was told.

[/quote]

Thank you for your reply. Now that you mention it, I think the ringing of the bell is connected to the ancient Jewish temple service.


#16

[quote="kingston1, post:5, topic:348373"]
I haven't heard the ringing of bells in some time. I miss that. What does it say in your pre-1967 missal that you are quoting that we the laity are to do at the time you are speaking of...?

[/quote]

Please go back and read my original post.


#17

I see that now. Thanks!


#18

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