Enance and Mortification


#1

:confused: wait… what??

religious-vocation.com/penance_and_mortification.html

St. Francis did this but I thought later he taught against it because if its self inflicted its in vain.


#2

Mortification has happened with many different Saints and Doctors of the Church.

This included St Francis; St Peter Damian, St Thomas More, St. Catherine of Siena and many others, most noteably St. Dominic Loricatus.

Mortification should be practices under the supervision of a spiritual director, if it happens at all. It must also be avoided by the scrupulous. However, in general mortification in it's widest sense happens when people observe fasts or who wear Cilices and so forth.

Many trials in our lives are self inflicted. Witholding things that we desire as a form of penance or out of love are mortifications. The fact that a trial is self inflicted does not make it in vain; after all did not Jesus spend many weeks fasting in the desert of his own volition?

:thumbsup:


#3

Not as far as I am aware. At the end of his life he apologised to ‘Brother A*s’ (his nickname for his body) for having treated it so harshly, however it seems to only have been the amount of mortification he practiced, rather than the fact that it was self-inflicted, that was the problem.

And I know the rule of the Secular Franciscan Order still begins, as it did in his day, with an exhortation to penance, discussing how penance is essential for everyone.

Many of the penances we do are self-inflicted, are they not? The fasting and abstinence on Ash Wednesdays and Good Fridays and the like? Unless there’s a priest standing next to you with a gun to your head forcing you not to eat on those days or something, then the answer must surely be yes. :shrug:


#4

[quote="ChristianSurfer, post:1, topic:205402"]
:confused: wait.... what??

religious-vocation.com/penance_and_mortification.html

St. Francis did this but I thought later he taught against it because if its self inflicted its in vain.

[/quote]

Rolling in snow is pretty mild, as far as mortification is concerned. St. Francis' practice was more about benign neglect than a really focused * 'rack-and-whip' approach to mortification--he knew what mattered, and ignored the rest.*


closed #5

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