Encourage child to become a priest or nun?


#1

Would you encourage your child to consider becoming a priest or nun? Why or why not?


#2

As some one who once considered a vocation, I feel it is my moral obligation to encourage my children to explore a religious vocation. It would be an extreme honor and blessing if either ( or both) of my children were called to religious life.


#3

The current shortage of priests and nuns is because children AREN’T being encouraged toward the that sort of life. I can’t say why, each parent probably have their own reasons. Or, perhaps, they’ve never considered doing so.


#4

It is the duty of a Catholic mother to foster an atmosphere for a potential vocation to the priesthood or religious life.

What a tremendous blessing it must be to have a child serving the Lord as a priest or a nun…!:slight_smile:


#5

I have informed my 6 year old son on many occasions that I will be proud of him if he choses any lawful employ when he grows up, but that I would be MOST proud of him if he becomes a priest.

Right now I’m leveraging the fact I am in formation to the deaconate.

He seems really psyc’ed about the idea that if he becomes a priest, I, as a deacon, will have to do what HE says.

( I did tell him that, if he becomes a priest, I would be MORE than happy to serve as his deacon :slight_smile: )

As of now, he wants to be an astronaut Mon-Sat and come back down to be a priest on Sundays.

I told him studies hard and prays hard, he can be the first Bishop of Lunar Colony :wink:


#6

[Brendan, I didn’t know you are studying to be a deacon! GREAT!]

My son, age 14, has recently been talking about the possibility of becoming a priest. I am praying that he discerns and answers his vocation, whatever it is (although I am particularly praying he decides to become a priest!). If he does become a priest, it will be the end of his name handed down for generations in my husband’s family, but that’s OK.

'thann


#7

My youngest son is 20 and I am still praying for his vocation. I have encouraged him for years, but would never force a vocation to the priesthood on him. I just keep praying for God’s will. My oldest son often talks to many of the military chaplins, and the priests on his base. I just pray for God’s will for him.

Like they always say its not over till the fat lady sings… so I keep praying till God directs them to when he wants them to be.


#8

Definitely! My youngest son (he is 31) has just gone back to the Seminary after the summer vacation. He has five more years to go - he has completed two years pre-seminary studies and two of the seven years of seminary studies. This year is his spiritual year.

He first had thoughts of becoming a priest when he was five, but didn’t speak much about it. Then when he was eleven - again, didn’t talk much. when he was fifteen I asked our then parish priest if he thought Simon might become a priest, and his answer was “I think it’s not so much if and when!” More time passed, and in January 2000 he turned 27, with no sign of any move to enter the seminary. So - I started praying “Lord, if you are calling Simon, make your call loud, clear, unambiguous, and irrestible!” Two months later he told me that he was going to talk to the Rector of the Seminary!!

It is a great honor to have a child who wants to consecrate their life to the Lord - whether as a priest, a monk, a brother, a nun, or a lay consecrated person. We should do everything we can to make the way smooth and easy for them.


#9

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

I would be sooooo happy. God calls each one of us to a vocation. It is my job to:

  1. Live my own vocation as well as I can with God’s help

  2. Teach my children to follow the vocation that Our Lord calls him/her to and, of course,

  3. Give my children a thorough education in our faith. This goes way past what the school is going to teach because they will have to be able to defend it. (Hey! Sounds like a new thread coming). :wink:


#10

i said yes, but it is VERY important that you make sue they know in the end it is not expected of them and that it is god’s perogative that would call them, not their own whims or parental pressure.


#11

One evening, our youngest son wanted to know the answer to the following question.
“Mom - can priests ride motorcycles?”

“Yep, they sure can”

“Okay, then I will be a priest.” :slight_smile:

My eldest son wanted to know if a pope could play soccer. We assured him that he could and that our beloved JPII was a great athlete in his younger days.

My husband and I tell our sons that they need to be open to God’s call in their lives, no matter what that call may be.

If we put the idea of becoming a religious in front of our children, just as we put other vocations and careers, then they will be comfortable with choosing what God wants of them.

We pray of course, that one of them, if not all three will become priests!


#12

[quote=Lance]Would you encourage your child to consider becoming a priest or nun?
[/quote]

Nope-if I had a child that is.

Why or why not?

Easy, I’m not a Roman Catholic, nor do I plan on being one :stuck_out_tongue:


#13

[quote=thann][Brendan, I didn’t know you are studying to be a deacon! GREAT!]

'thann
[/quote]

Got accepted this June for Formation starting this fall.

I should be in the class of '2008, depending on certain factors, like having child #4 due in Jan :smiley:


#14

That’s what most converts have said. :thumbsup:

I think my son has a vocation and I have encouraged him to think about it.


#15

We made sure our kids knew that was an option for them. Of course, they need to figure it out themselves; but at least we made sure it was something they could consider…


#16

That is exactly what I said 36 years ago when we got married. I converted 4 years later, have joined the Knight of Columbus, become an usher and an Extraordinary Minister of the Euchristic and go to Adoration for one hour per week. Never say never! You just don’t know what God has in mind for you. :smiley:


#17

I would be so proud of any of my children (once I have or adopt them!) if they chose religious life. It wasn’t really offered as an option for my brother and I growing up, and when I was considering religious life in college, my parents weren’t too terribly happy with the idea. I want my kids to know that it is always an option for them!


#18

[quote=Lance]of Columbus, become an usher and an Extraordinary Minister of the Eucharistic and go to Adoration for . :smiley:
[/quote]

OK Pet peeve here time here

There is no such thing as an Extraordinary Minister of the Eucharist!

Per Canon Law, a Minister of the Eucharist is the person who offers the Eucharist, namely says Mass and confects the Eucharist. A priest or Bishop ONLY. Not even a Deacon is a Minister of the Eucharist, Extraordinary or otherwise.

What Deacons are, and the laity can be is a Minister of Holy Communion. The Deacon does this Ordinarily, the laity do this Extraordinarily.


#19

Nope–but maybe we just have different definitions of “encourage”.

The calling need to come from God, not from me. If one of my children had such a calling I would, of course, support that.


#20

I would only encourage my child to the priesthood (if I were Catholic) if I recognized the gifts that would make him a good priest. Assuming it is the Latin Church I would want to be sure he has the gift of celibacy. Not many do. I would then want to make sure he had pastoral gifts. If he does not then I would encourage him in the direction that I, as his father, should recognize and foster him in. I would encourage him in whatever profession/vocation that fits him as a person. a parent should Aknow their child well enough to know their gifts.

I think just generally encouraging a child in a direction that they are not cut out for is dangerous to them and others. If my son is an average student who hates science and has a shaky hand I would be foolish to encourage him to be a surgeon.

Mel


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.