English/Spanish Wedding

I am helping plan a wedding between an American woman and Mexican man, who want the Mass to be in both English and Spanish, complete with all the Mexican traditions. I am working on my own program for the order of the Mass, but I'm sure, with the amount of marriages of this type that must happen, there has to be one on the internet somewhere that already exists. This is not easy!!

Does anyone have one they can offer me? Or advice of any kind, large or small, would be appreciated. Thanks!

I think the most important thing is to get the input of the priest who will be celebrating the Mass.

[quote="VanillaBean, post:1, topic:182060"]
I am helping plan a wedding between an American woman and Mexican man, who want the Mass to be in both English and Spanish, complete with all the Mexican traditions. I am working on my own program for the order of the Mass, but I'm sure, with the amount of marriages of this type that must happen, there has to be one on the internet somewhere that already exists. This is not easy!!

Does anyone have one they can offer me? Or advice of any kind, large or small, would be appreciated. Thanks!

[/quote]

Well, if they are really that traditonal, you have to include the part where the groom gives the bride ,the arras(little golden coins), and when they put the lasso around them.
Check this website out, it has some heplful information:
weddingdetails.com/lore/mexican.cfm#traditions

rossetta stone has some good translations:D

I have planned these type of weddings. There is no real mean feat to this. I have to go right now to drop off a project, but, as soon as I come back, I will give you a layout that will help you.

Here is what I did for my cousin’s wedding. Our family was the English-speaking contingent while her groom’s was the Spanish-language party:

Entrance Processional: Jesu, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring

First Reading: Song of Songs (Proclaimed in Spanish, but, the English version was printed on the program)

Psalm: Dichoso el que teme al Senor (Manuel Garcia)

Second Reading: Revelation (Wedding Feast of the Lamb; Proclaimed in English, but the Spanish version was printed on the program)

Gospel: Wedding at Cana (Proclaimed in English, but, the Spanish version was printed on the program)

The homily was mostly in English.

The vows were in English.

The arras (coins) immediately followed after the exchange of rings (also in English). My parochial vicar, who does incredibly awesome weddings, recited this prayer before the exchange of the coins:

Lord we ask that you bless (groom) with (bride),
as you once blessed Abraham with Sarah,
Isaac with Rebekkah,
Jacob with Rachel and
Joseph with Mary,
and may their love bloom like the Rose of Jericho
and may generosity be a fruit of that Rose,
generosity with each other, their children and with the poor whom
they will surely meet along the road of this life.

After the coins are exchanged, then comes the laso. It is usually given by a married couple whom the newlyweds admire the most.

The prayer that my PV uses is this:

Lord, bless this laso, the visible sign of the invisible bonds of love that now unite (bride and groom) in marriage.

Then, the Mass continues in the usual way with the General Intercession. The laso is removed from the couple after Communion so that the bride, if she so chooses, and the groom present flowers to the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Now, the arras and the laso are not part of the Nuptial rite; however, their usage is a very old tradition in Mexico and is valid use of inculturation.

I would caution against doing a completely bilingual Liturgy of the Eucharist. It is best to stick with one language. Often, it will be the language that gets the most response. If music is used, it should be in the same language as the rest of the Mass, or, the parts of the Mass could be done in Latin (simple chant). In fact, that is one of the recommendations made in Sacramentum Caritatis.

Benedictgal,

Thank you!! That was very helpful.

The couple attends a traditional-minded Parish which offers the NO Mass almost entirely in Latin (Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Pater Noster, Agnus Dei, Liturgy of the Eucharist), so do you think it would be a good idea to keep the Lityrgy of the Eucharist in Latin? I don't want to completely overwhelm people with three different languages going, but I have a feeling the Catholics will know whats going on, regardless of language, and the Protestants will probably be lost, regardless of the language (although I am going to do my best to be specific with the kneeling, responding, sitting, standing, etc in the program). There will, of course, be translations for everything.

Yes, the groom's family is very traditional Mexican and will be including the lazo and arras, along with a devotion to the Blessed Mother.

Right now, what we have discussed with the couple, and the two priests (one from the Parish they attend, and the other from his parent's Spanish Mass) is to have one reading in English and one in Spanish, the sung prayers and the Liturgy of the Eucharist as per normal for the Parish in Latin, and they would like to do their vows in Spanish. The Gospel will be read in English, but they would like their Parish priest to give a homily, as well as his parent's priest to say a few words in Spanish. Also, at least one hymn will be in Spanish.

Is this all too confusing? I feel like writing it out like this it disorganized and looks more complicated than it really is, but your educated advice and input is welcomed!

[quote="VanillaBean, post:7, topic:182060"]
Benedictgal,

Thank you!! That was very helpful.

The couple attends a traditional-minded Parish which offers the NO Mass almost entirely in Latin (Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Pater Noster, Agnus Dei, Liturgy of the Eucharist), so do you think it would be a good idea to keep the Lityrgy of the Eucharist in Latin? I don't want to completely overwhelm people with three different languages going, but I have a feeling the Catholics will know whats going on, regardless of language, and the Protestants will probably be lost, regardless of the language (although I am going to do my best to be specific with the kneeling, responding, sitting, standing, etc in the program). There will, of course, be translations for everything.

Yes, the groom's family is very traditional Mexican and will be including the lazo and arras, along with a devotion to the Blessed Mother.

Right now, what we have discussed with the couple, and the two priests (one from the Parish they attend, and the other from his parent's Spanish Mass) is to have one reading in English and one in Spanish, the sung prayers and the Liturgy of the Eucharist as per normal for the Parish in Latin, and they would like to do their vows in Spanish. The Gospel will be read in English, but they would like their Parish priest to give a homily, as well as his parent's priest to say a few words in Spanish. Also, at least one hymn will be in Spanish.

Is this all too confusing? I feel like writing it out like this it disorganized and looks more complicated than it really is, but your educated advice and input is welcomed!

[/quote]

I would have the second priest say something after the post-Communion prayer, following the presentation of the flowers to the BVM.

This is the music that I used for my cousin's wedding:

Presentation of the Gifts: Donde Hay Caridad y Amor
Communion: Panis Angelicus
Presentation of the Flowers to the BVM: Ave Maria
Recessional Ode to Joy

If you send me a PM, I can send you the music for both the psalm and the hymn for the Presentation of the Gifts.

If Latin is the norm for your parish, then, by all means, run with it. The only issue with the recitation of the vows is that both parties need to be extremely fluent with their chosen language. That is why my cousin and her groom chose English. Remember, too, that it's not just the vows, but the consent prior to the vows and the rings.

Do you have access to the Marriage ritual book in Spanish?

One other thing I forgot to mention was that for the offertory, I had both mothers (my Aunt and the groom's mother) bring up the gifts. If incense is used, as in the case of my cousin's wedding, it is very appropriate for the celebrant to incense the couple. This is SOP for my parochial vicar at the wedding Masses he celebrates.

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