Entrance in Latin Mass

When the Tridentine Mass was the norm before Vatican II, did the priest not process into the church with the servers and the crucifix? In all the Latin Masses I’ve been to, they just come out of the sacristry.

Can’t speak to the pre-Vat II Mass, but at the indult Mass I attend, if it’s a High Mass, the priest processes down the aisle with the altar boys and crucifix. At a Low Mass, the bell is rung and he comes directly out of the sacristy to the side of the altar.

At a Missa Cantata (“High Mass”) or Low Mass there usually isn’t a procession, or incense. Before the 1960s, incense was evenforbidden, except by limited papal indult, in any Mass that was not Solemn High (i.e. celebrated with deacon and subdeacon).

Since then, however, some celebrants of High Mass did (and still do) avail themselves of processions and incense.

It’s only required in a Solemn High Mass, however.

In low mass there is no procession through the church. The priest and server(s) go to the altar the shortest way possible.

In a solemn mass there is a procession that has a thurifer, crucifer, two acolytes bearing candles, and torchbearers, in pairs of two with maximum of six.

The Missa Cantata or sung mass, “more solemn form” also has a procession the same as solemn mass but without the deacon and subdeacon.

I am blessed at my parish, www.materecclesiae.org. We have a Missa Cantata, solemn form every Sunday. A lot of indult masses only have the ability to offer low mass, mostly because of the musicians required to sing the propers in gregorian chant and also lack of servers.

Ken

[quote=Anima Christi]When the Tridentine Mass was the norm before Vatican II, did the priest not process into the church with the servers and the crucifix? In all the Latin Masses I’ve been to, they just come out of the sacristry.
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I have been to two high masses and there wasn’t a procession. The altar boy rang the bell and the priest walked in, he took of his Baretta, gave the sign of the cross, and then the choir began singing the introit.

Psalm45:9-Was it a High Mass or Missa Cantata (sung low mass)? I ask because you only mention one altar boy and unless I’m mistaken, there are usually more at High Mass. Was there a deacon and sub-deacon as well?

I’ve seen both large procession, and simple entrance from sacristy for a Missa Cantata (one time I think because the musicians were late). I’ve only been to one full-fledged High Mass, and there was a full, BIG procession (but that is the usual custom with their Missa Cantatas as well). I’ve also only been to one full-fledged low mass, and that was just a simple entrance.

The Missa Cantata or sung mass, “more solemn form” also has a procession the same as solemn mass but without the deacon and subdeacon.

A solemn entrance procession is only optional at a Missa Cantata, not obligatory.

I have been to two high masses and there wasn’t a procession. The altar boy rang the bell and the priest walked in, he took of his Baretta, gave the sign of the cross, and then the choir began singing the introit.

This is most traditional, and typical, at a Missa Cantata.

I ask because you only mention one altar boy and unless I’m mistaken, there are usually more at High Mass.

There are no number of servers specificed by the rubrics. One server suffices.

[quote=pm1853]Psalm45:9-Was it a High Mass or Missa Cantata (sung low mass)? I ask because you only mention one altar boy and unless I’m mistaken, there are usually more at High Mass. Was there a deacon and sub-deacon as well?

I’ve seen both large procession, and simple entrance from sacristy for a Missa Cantata (one time I think because the musicians were late). I’ve only been to one full-fledged High Mass, and there was a full, BIG procession (but that is the usual custom with their Missa Cantatas as well). I’ve also only been to one full-fledged low mass, and that was just a simple entrance.
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You’re right, it was a sung mass, I didn’t realize there was a difference until I looked it up last night. Pax Vobiscvm!

I was under the impression that the low mass was spoken, the high mass was sung, and the solemn high mass was sung and had a subdeacon and a deacon. Could someone elaborate more for me?

The Low Mass is spoken.

The Missa Cantata is a Low Mass that is sung and may or may not include some aspects of the High Mass. The Epistle and Gospel may or may not be chanted (I’ve seen both), The Asperges Me may or may not be used (I’ve seen both). Insense may or may not be used (I’ve seen both). If there is no deacon and sub-deacon present, it will always be a Low Mass, though it may or may not be sung.

The High Mass is always sung (to my knowledge).

There are no number of servers specificed by the rubrics. One server suffices.

Really. I had no idea. Interesting to know.

I should back-track. I’m not an authority on the matter. I should have said I’ve only seen (or not seen) these practices. I’m only assuming that the presence or lack of aspects of the High Mass in the Missa Cantata is permitted. These are observations only.

Unless I’m mistaken though, a High Mass and a Solemn High Mass are the same thing.

Unless I’m mistaken though, a High Mass and a Solemn High Mass are the same thing.

The confusion arises from there being a disparity between the official terminology of the Church, and the common phraseology employe in English-speaking countires, especially the USA.

The 1962 rubrics distinguish three different “levels” of Masses.

There is the Missa Solemnis, which is a sung Liturgy with priest, deacon, and subdeacon. This is the normative celebration for every liturgy, though by no means the most common.

Then there is the Missa Privata, which is a spoken liturgy, celebrtaed by priest alone. I believe the word privata is meant in the sense of “deprived”; that is, of the external ceremonials of the Missa Solemnis.

A Missa Cantata is a liturgy that is sung, but celebrated by priest alone. It’s a sort of compromise between the Missa Solemnis and Missa Privata.

In some places, it was customary to refer to the Missa Solemnis as “High Mass,” the Missa Privata as “Low Mass,” and the Missa Cantata as “Sung Mass.”

Among others, though, it became common to refer to the Missa Solemnis as “Solemn High Mass,” the Missa Privata as “Low Mass,” and the Missa Cantata as “High Mass.”

So it depends on who you talk to.

Just to note that in the normal low Mass in the " old days " there was no need to carry in a Crucifix because the Crucifix was there waiting on the altar—it hadn’t been banished from the interior of the church.

That’s what I learned: the low mass was spoken, the high mass was sung, and the solemn high mass had a deacon and subdeacon; but thank you for clairifying.

[quote=Dr. Bombay]At a Low Mass, the bell is rung and he comes directly out of the sacristy to the side of the altar.
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Heh. That’s still the way it’s done for weekday Masses at St. Peter’s in Chicago’s Loop.

[quote=Psalm45:9]I have been to two high masses and there wasn’t a procession. The altar boy rang the bell and the priest walked in, he took of his Baretta, gave the sign of the cross, and then the choir began singing the introit.
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How many altar boys were there at this high mass you went to.

I can 100% guarantee you that if there was no procession and there was only 2 altar boys it was not a high mass.

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