Entrance to heaven through grace?


#1

Ok.

So.

When i stand before God after my death.

And I am shown that, although i havent given it my best.

Im lazy, dont pray enough (yes daily, but it could be more).

I dont really go to daily mass.

I dont think of him every second of the day.

And i dont think im very much of a good person.

BUT, no mortal sins.

Will he allow me to enter?

Searching in Him.

Andre.


#2

[quote=Magicsilence]Ok.

So.

When i stand before God after my death.

And I am shown that, although i havent given it my best.

Im lazy, dont pray enough (yes daily, but it could be more).

I dont really go to daily mass.

I dont think of him every second of the day.

And i dont think im very much of a good person.

BUT, no mortal sins.

Will he allow me to enter?

Searching in Him.

Andre.

[/quote]

hmmmmm, Yes, just a little more cleansing will be required in puragatory…me tinks


#3

You could’ve prayed all day long - been the BEST person you could possibly be AND gone to mass twice a day your entire life and you STILL wouldn’t “deserve” heaven - because it’s impossible to be perfect - you are human - with human failings. God knows this and loves you anyhow. It’s by His grace that anyone is allowed in heaven.

Try your best. Attend mass. Go to confession when you fail. And know that God loves you more than you could ever imagine.

Peace,
CM


#4

Yes (as a hypothetical). In this example you never drove away God’s sanctifying grace in your soul by rejecting Him though deliberate and greivous sin. Bear in mind however, that what you described might hamper one’s ability to persevere in the faith.

Scott


#5

Maybe no mortal sins of commission, but what about sins of omission?

In Jesus’ story about Lazarus and the rich man, the rich man was guilty of the sin of omission. The rich man wasn’t abusing or exploiting the poor man (sin of commission), he was merely ignoring the poor man in his need (sin of omission). Look where that way of life got the rich man.… how shall we escape if we neglect such a great salvation?
Heb 2:3

So, because you are lukewarm, and neither hot nor cold, I am going to vomit you out of My mouth.
Revelation 3:16


#6

Matt16_18, I’ve asked around, here on the forums, for people to explain sins of ommission to me. No-one can explain to me what a sin of omission is apart from a very general statement. I can’t tell when I’ve commited one of these sins and when I haven’t, because I don’t know what I’ve sinfully omitted and what I didn’t have to do in the first place. I even asked a priest about it and couldn’t get a straight answer.

One of the conditions for a sin to be mortal is that you know that it is wrong. So, my conclusion is that for most of us, it seems that almost any sin of omission would be a venial sin, since no-one seems to know what it is or when it is wrong. (Except for really obvious cases like not going to mass on Sunday).


Andre - I’m assuming that you have been baptised? (You didn’t mention it in your post). When you are baptised you become in a state of sanctifying grace. If you die while in that state of grace then you will go to heaven. If you haven’t done any mortal sins then you will still be in that state - venial sins, and things like not praying enough, don’t cause you to lose the state of grace. Also, if you have commited a mortal sin and didn’t realise it or can’t remember it, it will be forgiven when you go to reconciliation / confession (although if you later remember it you must confess it next time you’re at reconciliation) and hence you will be restored to a state of grace. Hopefully this answers your question.


#7

A Sunday School teacher asked her class, “Does anyone here know what we mean by sins of omission?”

A small girl replied: “Aren’t those the sins we should have committed, but didn’t?” :wink:

Matt. chapter 25 is all about sins of omission – the foolish maidens that had no oil for their lamps when the bridegroom appeared; the wicked and slothful servant that was given one talent by his master but did nothing with what he was given; the “goats” who gave no food to the hungry, no drink to the thirsty, did not clothe the naked, nor visit the sick nor those in prison.
If a brother or sister is ill-clad and in lack of daily food, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what does it profit? So faith by itself, if it has no works, is dead.
James 2:15-17


#8

[quote=carol marie]You could’ve prayed all day long - been the BEST person you could possibly be AND gone to mass twice a day your entire life and you STILL wouldn’t “deserve” heaven - because it’s impossible to be perfect - you are human - with human failings. God knows this and loves you anyhow. It’s by His grace that anyone is allowed in heaven.

Try your best. Attend mass. Go to confession when you fail. And know that God loves you more than you could ever imagine.

Peace,
CM
[/quote]

Couldn’t have said it better - Amen!


#9

[quote=Matt16_18]A Sunday School teacher asked her class, “Does anyone here know what we mean by sins of omission?”

A small girl replied: “Aren’t those the sins we should have committed, but didn’t?”
:wink:

Matt. chapter 25 is all about sins of omission – the foolish maidens that had no oil for their lamps when the bridegroom appeared; the wicked and slothful servant that was given one talent by his master but did nothing with what he was given; the “goats” who gave no food to the hungry, no drink to the thirsty, did not clothe the naked, nor visit the sick nor those in prison.If a brother or sister is ill-clad and in lack of daily food, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what does it profit? So faith by itself, if it has no works, is dead.

James 2:15-17

[/quote]

(-: about the little girl

Mmm yea I have read Matt 25 a few times - I understand the biblical basis of sins of omission. But what I don’t get is the specifics - exaqctly when is it a sin and when it isn’t. If you feed 1 hungry person in your lifetime, have you satisfied the ‘For I was hungry and you fed me’ thing? If it doesn’t, how much do you have to do? Would 1 day a week, or 1 day a month, of charitable works suffice? Exactly what is my responsibility, requirement, etc, so that I don’t do a sin of omission? (I dont have any dependents). This is what I’m confused about.


#10

There is a common, but much overlooked, theme in both the old and new testaments. Love God and love your neighbor is usually understood by most Christians. The part that is frequently missed is that love of God is manifest in one’s love of neighbor. Jesus said that anyone who professes to love God but does not love his neighbor is a liar. Pretty strong words, so I assume He meant exactly what He said.

As to when and how much we should help others, it seems to be a matter of personal interpretation. St. Paul writes that we should work hard and make a lot of money, not for ourselves but to be better able to help those less fortunate. In the old testament, the Israelites were not doing so good at that and, through his priests, God imposed an additional levy that was to be used expressly to help the “widows, orphans and wanderers.” Helping those in need is repeated so many times throughout both testaments that all of us would do well to take heed. After all, this is the second great commandment.

An unselfish willingness to help others should, in my opinion, become part of our very being. This can only be achieved by practice and prayer. It is not something we should keep a score card on. Should it be once a day, once a week, once a month, or whenever we perceive a need that we are able to fill? Nearly all of us fall short due to selfishness and greed, but, once in a while, someone like Mother Teresa comes along to show us what it is really all about and provide the rest of us sinners with a little inspiration.

Just my :twocents: .


#11

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