Episcopalian/ Anglican services

Anyone have suggestions on proper reverence for Catholics who are attending Episcopalian/Anglican “masses”?

Last funeral mass I went two, the genuflected to the altar, kneeled at the consecration, and of course had prayers from their very beautiful book of prayers.

I’m trying to find the line between “Christian worship” and disrespect to the Catholic Church, the church that I’m in and it’s congregrants.

Clearly, I wouldn’t take “communion.”

But how about kneeling at their “consecration”? Reverencing the altar?

Thanks.

I’m Anglican, so I know the question is not addressed to me. But I would not expect a RC to do either. And there are circumstances, with respect to certain types of Anglican churches, when I wouldn’t do either, either.

Just speaking as an Anglican, of course. But, given Apostolicae Curare, for a RC, there is nothing being consecrated, and nothing to reverence, at the altar.

GKC

Hi Mystagogy,

I will share with you that when I attend a Roman Catholic Church or any other Church for that matter, I follow what the congregrants do. Remember that this is a house of worshipping our God. I believe that the only requirement that you have as a Roman Catholic visitor is not to receive the Eucharist in another Christian Church. I am sure that you are aware that in the Episcopal Church, we do welcome all baptised Christian to the Lord’s Supper. You may wish to kneel or sit in your pew while others receive the Sacrament at the alter.

God Bless!

GKC,
From your post, it probably is best for you just to stay home…No one likes rude guests.

God Bless!

As to such Anglican churches, that is certainly what I do.

As to your other post, you will find, I think, that most RCs will understand not to reverence an Anglican altar, or kneel at the consecration, under any circumstances, given what their Church teaches about Anglican orders. Which was what the OP asked.

GKC

During the consecration, you will read in the BCP that you may stand or kneel. If you would like the page number, I will provide it for you.

We have many Roman Catholics that attend our Church to witness family baptisms and I have never witness anything such that you have recommended to the OP. The Catholics are always very polite and respectful.

God Bless!

Just as a side note, the Episcopal church has no problem with Catholics taking communion. I’ve done so when I’ve visited, but I’m not Catholic. They only require one to be a baptized Christian.

With that said, Catholics shouldn’t take it because it would go against Catholic teaching.

What do you think I recommended to the OP?

And you say that you find RCs who kneel at an Anglican consecration, or reverence the Presence on an Anglican altar? Which is what the OP asked.

Of course, since neither of us are RC, our opinions are really not what was requested. How about it, RCs? Should the OP kneel at an Anglican consecration, or reverence an Anglican altar?

GKC

What is an OP? No one bothers to define their acronyms in this forum.

OP=Original Post/Original Poster.

Not an uncommon acronym, IMO.

GKC

OP = Original poster = The one who started the thread.

As a Catholic, I would NOT reverence an Anglican altar or anything else - I would avoid being rude by stepping out during that part of the Anglican service.

This applies to all protestants. I would reverence and venerate at an Orthodox Church.

Nope.

GKC is absolutely right. We do not believe anything is actually occuring at an Anglican consecration, so of course we must not show that reverance by kneeling to what we believe is simply a piece of flat bread.

We must of course be respectful to their beliefs, but respect does not dictate that we follow everything the congregation does.

Also emeraldcoast, what is it that GKC said that was so rude?

My thanks.

As to my offense, I suspect it was my observation that, with respect to some (many) Anglican clergy, I agree with what the RCC thinks of Anglican clergy, generally. I refer to the matter of invalid matter, of course.

A personal observation. I have had occasion to be in my church, not during a service, accompanied by a very traditionalist RC. Who knows the rules. And who reverenced our altar, anyway. I told him there was no need for that, and, from his perspective, an imperative not to. He did it, anyway.

Whatcha gonna do?

GKC

And I would certainly understand. I reverence all altars upon which the Blessed Body is present or where it is reserved.

GKC

Thanks for the input.

When I mentioned reverencing the altar, I was thinking that a bow or genuflection is not out of line to a symbol of the cross.

I understand the fullness in the Catholic Church, but I don’t see emptiness in Christian churches with altars.

Well, when you introduce a term in writing you are supposed to spell it out the first time that it is used. Thereafter you may substitute an acronym for the term, if you feel it is more useful. However, acronyms are always somewhat rude.

Hi LDNCatholic,

Tell me if I were to remain seated when the Catholic priest asked me to stand or kneel that this would not be disrespectful. I am a guest at the Catholic Church and I should be respectful and polite. Nothing bad is going to happen to me if I get down on my knees and pray to God.

Some suggestions…

Why not pray for unity within the churches when we are kneeling? You could also pray and reflect on the death and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ through the words that are said even if you don’t believe that our Eucharist is the body and blood of Jesus. What about praying for the couple that are being married? What about praying for the family of the person’s funeral you are attending? You could also pray the rosary during the consecration.

God Bless!

I am sorry that I did not spell it out first. Many of us take for granted acronyms and forget that we do have people that are not familiar with the terms. Thanks for reminding us!

God Bless!

Your opinion is noted.

GKC

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