EU referendum: Britons will lose one month's income if they vote for Brexit, warn world-leading economists OECD


#1

telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/04/27/britain-brexit-one-month-income-oecd-pmqs-live-cameron-corbyn/

**EU referendum: Britons will lose one month’s income if they vote for Brexit, warn world-leading economists OECD

Leaving the EU would be the equivalent of imposing a “tax” of one month’s income on UK workers, one of the world’s leading economic think-tanks has said.

The head of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) said Brexit would be a “mistake” and accused those backing the Leave campaign of “wishful thinking”.

Secretary-general Jose Angel Gurria said there was “no kind of deal that could go better by yourselves than you would be in the company of the Europeans”.

He expressed bemusement that Britain was considering divorce with Brussels as the OECD prepared to publish its full analysis of the implications.**

“Brexit is like a tax. It is the equivalent to roughly missing out on about one month’s income within four years but then it carries on to 2030,” he told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

“That tax is going to be continued to be paid by Britons over time.”

The forecast is based on lower-than-expected growth rates outside the EU.

“In comparison with a baseline scenario they would otherwise have had in their pocket, in hand, to spend, they will not have - therefore it is as powerful, as real, as a tax or as if you would just give it over to somebody,” Mr Gurria said.

"**We have done the comparisons, we have done the simulations. In the end we come out and say: why are we spending so much time, so much effort and so much talent in trying to find ways to compensate for a bad decision when you do not necessarily have to take the bad decision?

“This is not wishful thinking - which we believe that the Brexit camp in many cases has been assuming**. There is absolutely no reason why you would get a sweeter trade deal than you already have, no reason why you would have a sweeter investment deal.”


#2

:smiley:

:stuck_out_tongue:


#3

Nonsense, it will all be magically better.

Seriously, though, do you think that core Brexit supporters really care about the economy? If they did then we’d have more than wishful-thinking on such topics.

Deep down isn’t it about a kind of alienation (including a fear that we have become an alien nation, perhaps?) with modernity?


#4

All this talk about the vote to exit the EU is great. But let me ask, where was the vote to join it! Who is voting for this body of EU MPs? And shouldn’t it be obvious that we’re in trouble if we rely on subsidies from other countries? It’s ridiculous to think that Britain won’t be able to sign trade agreements with other countries as a non-EU member. Even more ridiculous was believing that the EU single currency would actually work across such diverse economies…


#5

Uh, think it was 1975 here in Britain:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom_European_Communities_membership_referendum,_1975

**The United Kingdom EEC referendum of 1975 was a post-legislative referendum held on 5 June 1975 in the United Kingdom to gauge support for the country’s continued membership of the European Economic Community (EEC), often known as the Common Market at the time, which it had entered in 1973 under the Conservative government of Edward Heath. Labour’s manifesto for the October 1974 general election promised that the people would decide “through the ballot box”[1] whether to remain in the EEC. The electorate expressed significant support for EEC membership, with 67% in favour on a 65% turnout. This was the first ever referendum that was held throughout the entire United Kingdom
**

Who is voting for this body of EU MPs?

The electorate/peoples of Europe vote for EU MPs:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elections_to_the_European_Parliament#Apportionment#

**Elections to the European Parliament take place every five years by universal adult suffrage. 751 MEPs[1] are elected to the European Parliament, which has been directly elected since 1979…

The allocation of seats to each member state is based on the principle of degressive proportionality, so that, while the size of the population of each country is taken into account, smaller states elect more MEPs than is proportional to their populations. As the numbers of MEPs to be elected by each country have arisen from treaty negotiations, there is no precise formula for the apportionment of seats among member states. No change in this configuration can occur without the unanimous consent of all governments**

.

It’s ridiculous to think that Britain won’t be able to sign trade agreements with other countries as a non-EU member

No one said that. Our position will be far weaker for a host of reasons I’ve gone into ad nauseum over the past couple of threads, though.

Even more ridiculous was believing that the EU single currency would actually work across such diverse economies…

On this we are agreed but Britain is not in the Eurozone.


closed #6

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.