Eucharist- as a verb?

I need some assistance. I am having a blog conversation with someone who started off taking issue with Eucharistic Adoration

I had a handle on that part- but this person has now said thing to implicate they hold the thanksgiving or the community as the body of Christ to be more important than the Real Presence:

" Eucharist, even today I first think “thanksgiving” then “consecrated host.” and all of the above. Most folks don’t get beyond “consecrated host.”

I answered

Ignatius says “because they confess not the EUCHARIST to be the flesh of our Saviour Jesus Christ, which suffered for our sins, and which the Father, of His goodness, raised up again”. Now, if we substitute thanksgiving… because they confess not the THANKSGIVING to be the flesh of our Saviour Jesus Christ, which suffered for our sins, and which the Father, of His goodness, raised up again…the passage doesn’t make much sense- how can an action be the flesh of our saviour?


then, the other person came back with:

I think here is the crucial point of the discussion, your last question, speck: how can an action be the flesh of our saviour?

St. Teresa of Avila:
Christ has no body now but yours
No hands, no feet on earth but yours
Yours are the eyes through which He looks
compassion on this world
Christ has no body now on earth but yours.

That is how the flesh of Christ must be an action.

PS - try subbing in “act of thanksgiving” (aka Mass, aka holy eucharist, a ritual action) then, see if that works better.


I was going to say something about the consecration still occuring even if the priest is the only one at mass- but am I missing something?
Is this person right?

The problem is is the dichotomy of trying an either/or solution to the question. The word “Eucharist” is both a verb and a noun! As a noun it refers to the Body and Blood of Christ made present under the forms of bread and wine. As a verb it refers to the action of the community in giving thanks to God for the gift of His Son, and of returning the Son to the Father in sacrifice.

As usual, the answer is not to seek an either/or but to recognize the both/and solution.

Deacon Ed

Deacon Ed,

I understand and agree with what you say- but I guess I’m stumped as to how to convince this individual of that too. Just out of curiosity- which part of the dichotomy do you think is most important?

Since when is “Eucharist” a verb?? :eek:

Eucharist is Greek for “true gift” (eu “true, good” + charis “grace, gift, thanks” + t [suffix, don’t know what it’s for])… Meaning the Body of Christ. I have never read any Church document using it as a verb, and neither have I heard anyone use it as a verb until now…

[quote=Cradle]Since when is “Eucharist” a verb?? :eek:

Eucharist is Greek for “true gift” (eu “true, good” + charis “grace, gift, thanks” + t [suffix, don’t know what it’s for])… Meaning the Body of Christ. I have never read any Church document using it as a verb, and neither have I heard anyone use it as a verb until now…
[/quote]

Read this :slight_smile: blueletterbible.org/tmp_dir/words/2/1127797769-748.html

***eucharisteo (Strong’s 2168) ***occurs 41 times in 38 verses

Literally, “He eucharisted” :slight_smile:

The Greek noun is “eucharistia” ##

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.