Eucharist


#1

Hello, My name is Jacinta Patrick, married to a Catholic but we only did civil marriage. We were receiving The Holy Communion up until we got married 11 years ago. We are active in church and I always feel bad when I let people pass by to go receive the Holy Communion. I also feel like I really need to receive Jesus to help me strengthen my faith. Are we allowed to receive the Eucharist or we are supposed to marry in the Church before we receive. In my country Kenya, we are not allowed until we marry in church. (None of us was married before or divorced. It is Our first marriage.) We are planning to do church marriage as soon as we are settled financially. Please, inform if we can receive our Lord. Thank you


#2

Talk to your priest. It isn’t just Kenya; Church law is that one marries in the Church (in addition to any ‘civil’ marriage. The ‘civil’ marriage is not a substitute for the Church marriage). If you are free to marry it should be relatively easy for your priest to help you set up a church marriage/convalidation, but do NOT receive until you have done what your priest says and marry in the Church.


#3

Thank you. I had to ask because a few people ask why we don’t yet they did it even before they married in the church. may be they didn’t know. So i didn’t want to do it yet i knew it wasn’t allowed. I do appreciate your response. May God’s Holy Will be done and May God bless us all.


#4

You say that you’ve been married 11 years and you’re waiting for a church marriage until you’re settled financially.

Why wait?

If the financial element is because you think a wedding will be expensive, that’s not necessary. Your wedding can be as small as you, your witnesses, and the priest so there’s no particular expense. Or it could involve a few friends or family members who have a small celebration afterward, so only a small expense.

If the financial element is being able to pay your housing and other expenses, you’ve already been doing it for 11 years. It’s unlikely you’re going to suddenly come into money that will change your lifestyle from what it is now.

Talk to your priest about bringing your marriage into the Church and get the greatest gift you can imagine – being able to return to Communion.


#5

No, you are not allowed to receive until you marry in the Church. As you already know, in the eyes of the Catholic Church you are not married but are fornicating, which is why you cannot receive. Go and talk to your priest, you do not need to have anything but the priest and 2 witnesses to be married in the Church. If you have children it would be good for you to be married in the eyes of the church. This has nothing to do with being settled financially. You can have the party later.


#6

Ah. You are quite right; many people do not know the requirements. May God bless you and I hope you will soon be free to receive.


#7

That’s what I did; worked well…
Little wedding service, because of financial restraints, HUGE party later, which ended up being financially funded by a guest. Nice gift!!


#8

Thank you all very much. I am more than determined, I will do it no matter what. I feel like I can do it now. Let the united hearts of Jesus and Mary guide and protect us. Thanks once again.


#9

:D:D:D:D:D:D

:thumbsup:


#10

Isnt it called a ‘Blessing’ if you have been married outside the church and then decide to marry in the faith?

The wife and i got married in a civil ceremony 20 years ago and then about 8 years ago the priest gave us a ‘blessing’ in the church where we had 2 witnesses and had to recite various things.


#11

[quote="ajecphotos, post:10, topic:323669"]
Isnt it called a 'Blessing' if you have been married outside the church and then decide to marry in the faith?

The wife and i got married in a civil ceremony 20 years ago and then about 8 years ago the priest gave us a 'blessing' in the church where we had 2 witnesses and had to recite various things.

[/quote]

No, that is your wedding ceremony. If you haven't been married in the Church, there is no marriage to bless.


#12

A Catholic married outside of the Church (without permission from the bishop) is not validly married. Marrying in the Church is not about merely receiving a "blessing" but it is convalidating the civil marriage -- it is the rite of Marriage, the same as a never-married couple being married.


#13

Well, the priest at the time labelled it as a blessing.


#14

When a Catholic marries validly it is only with approval of the Catholic Church. There are three ways: normal, simple convalidation, and radical sanation. In the first two new consent is given, in the retroactive, prior and perduing consent is used.

Canon Law 1057
§1 A marriage is brought into being by the lawfully manifested consent of persons who are legally capable. This consent cannot be supplied by any human power.**

Canon Law 1108**
§1 Only those marriages are valid which are contracted in the presence of the local Ordinary or parish priest or of the priest or deacon delegated by either of them, who, in the presence of two witnesses, assists, in accordance however with the rules set out in the following canons, and without prejudice to the exceptions mentioned in cann. 144, 1112§1, 1116 and 1127§§2-3.

Simple convalidation, Canon Law 1157
The renewal of consent must be a new act of the will concerning a marriage which the renewing party knows or thinks was null from the beginning.

Radical sanation, Canon Law # 1161
§1. The radical sanation of an invalid marriage is its convalidation without the renewal of consent, which is granted by competent authority and entails the dispensation from an impediment, if there is one, and from canonical form, if it was not observed, and the retroactivity of canonical effects.

catholicdoors.com/misc/marriage/canonlaw.htm


#15

Now, can you put that into English please? Lol


#16

Many people refer to it as “having a marriage “blessed”” but the correct terminology is a Convalidation Ceremony (can be with or without a full Mass). The priest was speaking on a casual level to make sure everyone understood.
As a previous poster mentioned, in the eyes of the church, the couple is not married yet, so it is not a simple “blessing” a marriage, it is getting married in the first place.


#17

And those were the easy canons!

In a nutshell, a Catholic only enters matrimony with approval of the Church and that can be through the canonical form, through one of two types of con-validation, or the extraordinary case of consent given before two witnesses and no clergy (I did not give those canons). A matrimonial bond does not exist for a Catholic without one of these.


#18

Cheers


#19

The ministers of Holy Matrimony are not the priest or deacon, but the spouses themselves. It is a sacrament of love between a man and a woman. The priest or deacon witness the marriage for the Church. So if someone marries without permission outside of the Church the are validly but illicitly married. The so called ‘blessing’ service is a service regularising and already existing marriage. cf Catechism of the Catholic Church: 1623.

From Canon Law canon 1161: According to the Canon Law of the Roman Catholic Church, canon 1161 states that the“radical sanation [healing] of an individual marriage is its convalidation without the renewal of consent, granted by competent authority and including a dispensation from impediment, if there was one, and from the canonical form, if it was not observed, and the retroactivity into the past of the canonical effects.” Most couples who seek convalidation seek convalidation due to lack of “canonical form,” i.e. marrying outside of a church or parish.

It should not be too difficult to do. Obtain from the parish priest a form requesting radical sanatation (or download it), this is then presented to the Bishop. A statement is then issued convalidating the marriage from its beginning.

The important words in the above are: ‘its convalidation without the renewal of consent’ - seeing as the essential element of a marriage is the consent, and in this validation a renewal of consent is not required, so the marriage is recognised as having been valid from the beginning as the convalidation is retroacitve to when the marriage took place.

Certainly one should not receive communion until this has been done.


#20

This is certainly incorrect. The Catholic merely attempts matrimony without approval of the Church. The simple convalidation and radical sanation make valid what is invalid or null.

Simple Convalidation

Canon 1156 §1. To convalidate a marriage which is invalid because of a diriment impediment, it is required that the impediment ceases or is dispensed and that at least the party conscious of the impediment renews consent.

Canon 1159 §1. A marriage which is invalid because of a defect of consent is convalidated if the party who did not consent now consents, provided that the consent given by the other party perseveres.

Canon 1160 A marriage which is null because of defect of form must be contracted anew in canonical form in order to become valid, without prejudice to the prescript of ? can. 1127, §2.

Radical Sanation

Canon 1161 §1. The radical sanation of an invalid marriage is its convalidation without the renewal of consent, which is granted by competent authority and entails the dispensation from an impediment, if there is one, and from canonical form, if it was not observed, and the retroactivity of canonical effects.


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