Eucharistic Questions


#1

O.K. Three Eucharistica questions for you.
1.With Transubstaition, The Euchrist becomes the Body and Blood of Jesus, Yet still looks, smells, and tastes like bread. I know that this is used as an objection to the Euchrist. And I know that there is a answer to it but, I can’t remeber what it is. What would you say if faced with this objection?

  1. What is done with the Euchrist that is left over after the communion service? I can’t see us throwing it away.

  2. Is the Eucharist Jesus for a limited time or is it Jesus forever?

Thank you and God bless.


#2

[quote=Montie Claunch]O.K. Three Eucharistica questions for you.
1.With Transubstaition, The Euchrist becomes the Body and Blood of Jesus, Yet still looks, smells, and tastes like bread. I know that this is used as an objection to the Euchrist. And I know that there is a answer to it but, I can’t remeber what it is. What would you say if faced with this objection?

  1. What is done with the Euchrist that is left over after the communion service? I can’t see us throwing it away.

  2. Is the Eucharist Jesus for a limited time or is it Jesus forever?

Thank you and God bless.
[/quote]

#1- There are accidents and substance. The accidents remain after the consecration. This means that the Precious Blood looks like wine,tastes like wine, contains alcohol like wine. The Body of Christ looks and tastes like bread. However, through
transubstantiatio, the actually substance has changed. This means that the bread and wine has become the Body and Blood of Christ.

#2- The Eucharist is never to be thrown aways because it is Jesus in the real presence. Remaining hosts after a mass should be reposed in the tabernacle. If there is no tabernacle, for example maybe at a mass outside a church, the remaining hosts can be consumed by the priest.

#3- The Eucharist is always Jesus. The Eucharist never stops being Jesus after being consecrated. Once Jesus, always Jesus.

God Bless,
Matt


#3

[quote=Montie Claunch]O.K. Three Eucharistica questions for you.
1.With Transubstaition, The Euchrist becomes the Body and Blood of Jesus, Yet still looks, smells, and tastes like bread. I know that this is used as an objection to the Euchrist. And I know that there is a answer to it but, I can’t remeber what it is. What would you say if faced with this objection?
2. What is done with the Euchrist that is left over after the communion service? I can’t see us throwing it away.
3. Is the Eucharist Jesus for a limited time or is it Jesus forever?

[/quote]

  1. We believe in the real presence based on what Jesus said in Scripture, plain and simple. It is a mystery that we all cannot comprehend just like we cannot comprehend other articles of the faith like the omnipresence of God, the soul, heaven etc, but we believe it because Jesus clearly said it is so, and the Church clearly defined what was meant from the earliest days, so we need not question it further after that. I review each verse in Scripture regarding the real presence on my site at this link (click and scroll down to Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist):
    protestanterrors.com/#6
  2. Remaining Eucharists are left in the chalice and distributed at a future mass
  3. Once consecrated, the bread and wine are changed and remain that way.

Hope that helps!

BH
www.protestanterrors.com


#4

Sometimes God gives us a glimpse into Heaven.

For some Eucharistic Miracles:

therealpresence.org/eucharst/mir/a3.html


#5

A slight correction to two excellent answers

[quote=Montie Claunch]3. Is the Eucharist Jesus for a limited time or is it Jesus forever?
[/quote]

CCC #1377 “The Eucharistic presence of Christ begins at the moment of the consecration and endures as long as the Eucharistic species subsist.”

(In other words: If the elements are no longer recognizable through dissolution, digestion, (God forbid) decay, et cetera, the real presence ceases)

tee


#6
  1. The best answer I know to this question is to point out that Jesus “looked, smelled and tasted” like a human person. That is, no possible test or examination would have disclosed that Jesus was a Divine Person, God incarnate.

  2. The remaining hosts may be taken to the sick and home-bound, for one thing. Any others are kept in a tabernacle.

  3. The host is sacramentally Jesus as long as it maintains the appearance of bread. When it no longer has the appearance of bread (through digestion or any other action) it is no longer sacramentally Jesus.


#7

Just another minor point. There is usually a large host, consecrated for Exposition in a monstrance, and kept in a pyx in the tabernacle. This is usually consumed after a period of time (say a couple of months) and a new one consecrated. This is just in case the old one gets “stale” (the accidents that is.


#8

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