Euroclero Roman Collar Clergy Shirts


#1

I am looking to buy my first set of clergy shirts and want to purchase shirts with a full Roman Collar (that goes all the way around the neck). I started to look into the Barbiconi shirts but have heard they don't last. Euroclero seems to have the best reviews from those around me, problem is I can't find them in the U.S.

Does anyone know of any stores in the U.S. that carry Euroclero clergy shirts? I know you can order online from Euroclero but I'm sure that buying in the U.S. would be easier.

Thank you!


#2

I recommend a nice wool cassock with a fascia and biretta. It's very much the rage right now for seminarians and young priests.

;)

However, if you simply must have shirts instead, just buy something of high quality and probably only of natural fibers. If that happens to be Barbiconi, so be it. Follow the wash instructions exactly as they are written or hand wash them, which takes like five minutes a week. If they nevertheless fall apart, claim a quality defect from the manufacturer and they should refund your money.


#3

Your post sent me to their website. They are selling chasubles with John Paul II embroidered (or printed) on the orpheys. Is this kind of kitsch allowed?

It seems to me to break both the laws of the church and of good taste.


#4

One might also consider Gamarelli but, while the quality is excellent, they're really quite expensive. For something like shirts, though, I doubt one has to go to a Roman house.

There are several manufacturers in the US, including CM Almy which has been around for quite some years. They're not cheap, but the quality is good (at least it used to be).


#5

@YoungTradCath - Thank you for the advice. I may just end up purchasing and hoping they last but as they are expensive you can understand any hesitation. We are required to have clerics for daily wear but also to have cassocks (with no fascia or biretta).

@Usbek - I hope the chasubels are for display only.

@malphono - Thanks, I will look into Almy.


#6

[quote="Usbek_de_Perse, post:3, topic:287860"]
Your post sent me to their website. They are selling chasubles with John Paul II embroidered (or printed) on the orpheys. Is this kind of kitsch allowed?

It seems to me to break both the laws of the church and of good taste.

[/quote]

Of course it is permitted to depict a beatus of the Church on liturgical vestments.


#7

[quote="YoungTradCath, post:2, topic:287860"]
I recommend a nice wool cassock with a fascia and biretta. It's very much the rage right now for seminarians and young priests.

Once ordained, that's a personal choice to make. But not in seminary. What one wears to class, common prayer, meals and Mass is up to the rules of the particular seminary (or to the ordinary when one is away from seminary and at his home diocese). You may have some freedom as to wearing a cassock rather than clerical shirt when serving at a parish assignment. But, uniformity and obedience most definitely take precedence over one's personal preference for clerical fashion :-)

In Christ through Mary,
Frank

[/quote]


#8

[quote="cg_in_az, post:1, topic:287860"]
I am looking to buy my first set of clergy shirts and want to purchase shirts with a full Roman Collar (that goes all the way around the neck). I started to look into the Barbiconi shirts but have heard they don't last. Euroclero seems to have the best reviews from those around me, problem is I can't find them in the U.S.

Does anyone know of any stores in the U.S. that carry Euroclero clergy shirts? I know you can order online from Euroclero but I'm sure that buying in the U.S. would be easier.

Thank you!

[/quote]

I'm going to weigh in on this despite the fact that I have *no *knowledge of clerical clothing... Barbiconi has some shirts in microfiber. A lot of times, microfiber stuff costs a lot less than cotton or cotton/poly, so I have tried it out a few times. *Never again!!!! *It is flimsy, doesn't hold up well, and is not comfortable, and has a weird feel. i don't even like the towels!

Possibly some of your fellow students tried those out and that is why they don't like Barbiconi?

I'd go ahead and get the ones at Almy; with the dollar and Euro at odds with each other, it would be really expensive to get the ones from Italy (unless you or someone you know happens to be going there); plus *much *higher shipping costs from Europe. Take really good care of them: put some laudry detergent on the parts that tend to get dirtiest (and don't forget the neck!) and let them soak a bit--if you keep them cleaner, they will last longer; and also, don't put them in the drier--let them hang dry or iron them and let them finish off drying. All that lint in the drier? That's your clothes wearing away....

God bless you!


#9

[quote="Cominghome89, post:7, topic:287860"]
Once ordained, that's a personal choice to make. But not in seminary. What one wears to class, common prayer, meals and Mass is up to the rules of the particular seminary (or to the ordinary when one is away from seminary and at his home diocese). You may have some freedom as to wearing a cassock rather than clerical shirt when serving at a parish assignment. But, uniformity and obedience most definitely take precedence over one's personal preference for clerical fashion :-)

In Christ through Mary,
Frank

[/quote]

Of course I wasn't advocating for him to break any rules. I was just making a suggestion which could be taken up if his seminary and bishop allow as much.


#10

[quote="cg_in_az, post:1, topic:287860"]
I am looking to buy my first set of clergy shirts and want to purchase shirts with a full Roman Collar (that goes all the way around the neck). I started to look into the Barbiconi shirts but have heard they don't last. Euroclero seems to have the best reviews from those around me, problem is I can't find them in the U.S.

Does anyone know of any stores in the U.S. that carry Euroclero clergy shirts? I know you can order online from Euroclero but I'm sure that buying in the U.S. would be easier.

Thank you!

[/quote]

You might look at Almy. www.almy.com

Their shirts are of higher quality than either company you mention. They are lower in price and they are actually sewn in the USA. They have the collar style you are looking for.


#11

[quote="malphono, post:4, topic:287860"]
One might also consider Gamarelli but, while the quality is excellent, they're really quite expensive. For something like shirts, though, I doubt one has to go to a Roman house.

There are several manufacturers in the US, including CM Almy which has been around for quite some years. They're not cheap, but the quality is good (at least it used to be).

[/quote]

Sorry, I missed your posting. Almy is excellent.


#12

[quote="Usbek_de_Perse, post:3, topic:287860"]
Your post sent me to their website. They are selling chasubles with John Paul II embroidered (or printed) on the orpheys. Is this kind of kitsch allowed?

It seems to me to break both the laws of the church and of good taste.

[/quote]

Source please.


#13

I had some related questions regarding the cassock that perhaps some of you can answer? Depending on the diocese, both priests and deacons can wear the roman collar. If they choose to wear a cassock, may both wear the black fascia (sash)? Or does the fascia have the same status as the cincture/cingulum as a sign of celibacy (at least in theory)? May a priest or deacon wear a black cassock with a black shoulder cape (technically a pellegrina, not a mozzetta which is worn in conjunction with the rochet) attached? Finally may a priest or deacon wear a black biretta with a black cassock outside of the liturgy? Can he substitute the bonete (four-horned Spanish biretta)? My apologies for all the questions. Thank you.


#14

[quote="Exorcist, post:13, topic:287860"]
I had some related questions regarding the cassock that perhaps some of you can answer? Depending on the diocese, both priests and deacons can wear the roman collar. If they choose to wear a cassock, may both wear the black fascia (sash)? Or does the fascia have the same status as the cincture/cingulum as a sign of celibacy (at least in theory)? May a priest or deacon wear a black cassock with a black shoulder cape (technically a pellegrina, not a mozzetta which is worn in conjunction with the rochet) attached? Finally may a priest or deacon wear a black biretta with a black cassock outside of the liturgy? Can he substitute the bonete (four-horned Spanish biretta)? My apologies for all the questions. Thank you.

[/quote]

I imagine anyone privileged to wear the cassock is privileged to wear the fascia, except altar boys. Transitional deacons wear cassock and fascia all the time, and so I don't see why a permanent deacon couldn't, at least in principle. I think a good, well-made cassock without a fascia usually looks a bit silly, unless the wearer is working or something.

I do not think a deacon may wear a pellegrina. I have seen several priests wear them (with black piping rather than a bishop's/monsignor's violet or cardinal's red), and generally these priests are pastors of parishes rather than parochial vicars. The pellegrina is a symbol of authority and jurisdiction, methinks.

The biretta is a really a liturgical headdress, I believe. The proper street headwear of a Latin priest is the beaver hair cappello Romano with black tassels: img219.imageshack.us/img219/5140/saturno1cu3.jpg or in the Summer a tassel-less straw variant, optionally.

I'm pretty sure a priest or deacon may wear whatever kind of biretta he wants: the finned without tuft, the finned with tuft, or the Spanish horned with tuft.


#15

[quote="YoungTradCath, post:14, topic:287860"]
I imagine anyone privileged to wear the cassock is privileged to wear the fascia, except altar boys. Transitional deacons wear cassock and fascia all the time, and so I don't see why a permanent deacon couldn't, at least in principle. I think a good, well-made cassock without a fascia usually looks a bit silly, unless the wearer is working or something.

[/quote]

Now a days, any priest or seminarian wearing a cassock can wear the fascia, although previously, it was a sign of an immovable pastor, if memory serves. But now, any cassock wearing cleric may wear one.

[quote="YoungTradCath, post:14, topic:287860"]
I do not think a deacon may wear a pellegrina. I have seen several priests wear them (with black piping rather than a bishop's/monsignor's violet or cardinal's red), and generally these priests are pastors of parishes rather than parochial vicars. The pellegrina is a symbol of authority and jurisdiction, methinks.

[/quote]

That sounds about right. We need to get the new church visible book!


#16

[quote="YoungTradCath, post:14, topic:287860"]
I do not think a deacon may wear a pellegrina. I have seen several priests wear them (with black piping rather than a bishop's/monsignor's violet or cardinal's red), and generally these priests are pastors of parishes rather than parochial vicars.

[/quote]

Those priest were most likely Canon Lawyers. IIRC, among secular priests, they're the only ones normally so entitled.


#17

Just recommending another supplier. R.J. Toomey out of Worcester, MA makes shirts and cassocks. They are reasonably priced, from what I have seen. I don't believe they have an online website yet to order(they send to stores, as a rule) but you can order online through one of the stores. There is matthewfsheehan.net out of Boston that has the ordering info(other places too, I'm just familiar with them. They should be able to send it to you directly, w/o it going to their place. I guess Toomey wants to work with large or steady purchasers.
Also, like someone alluded to, the shoulder cape is reserved(as a rule) for priests who are pastors/have jurisdiction. The fascia can be worn by all priests and seminarians(when authorised).
By the way, if one is looking for well constructed biretta's, I know that House of Hanson in Chicago makes a decent one and is on the low side-$90 or so. Others that I have heard about may be close to $140-150. Just tossing that out.

CB


#18

[quote="Cowboy2012, post:17, topic:287860"]
Just recommending another supplier. R.J. Toomey out of Worcester, MA makes shirts and cassocks. They are reasonably priced, from what I have seen. I don't believe they have an online website yet to order(they send to stores, as a rule) but you can order online through one of the stores. There is matthewfsheehan.net out of Boston that has the ordering info(other places too, I'm just familiar with them. They should be able to send it to you directly, w/o it going to their place. I guess Toomey wants to work with large or steady purchasers.
Also, like someone alluded to, the shoulder cape is reserved(as a rule) for priests who are pastors/have jurisdiction. The fascia can be worn by all priests and seminarians(when authorised).
By the way, if one is looking for well constructed biretta's, I know that House of Hanson in Chicago makes a decent one and is on the low side-$90 or so. Others that I have heard about may be close to $140-150. Just tossing that out.

CB

[/quote]

Would you happen to know where the Church officially documents this? Thanks.


#19

Reilly's Church Supply in Boise has Italian-made clerical shirts with the all-around Roman collar and a square notch. They are not Barbiconi - in fact, the label doesn't say who made them, but they last forever and sell for around $60.

One thing to always remember about Roman collar shirts (not tab collar shirts), is that you never put them in the dryer with any heat. The black, stand-up collars have an internal plastic stiffener, which will warp and become misshapen with fairly low heat.


#20

Ex,
Even though I am not from Missouri, I like proof as well in some of these things. I have gotten the info from a few priests and believe I seen it before. I cannot put my name on the book put out in the late 40's? which may mention it. I will see if I can find a good source.
Good to here about that place in Idaho with the Italian shirts. Will let others know if asked.

CB


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