European Calendar


#1

In the United States, most Christians say that they observe Sunday, the first day of the week, at least in part, to commemorate the resurrection which they believe took place on the first day of the week. Does anyone know, in those areas of Europe that use a calendar that labels the seventh day of the week, “Sunday”, on what day they hold their weekly worship services? If they hold it on the seventh day, do they reject the first day as being a special day?


#2

I think those calendars are just used to separate the work week from weekend. It does not mean that Sunday is any different from what it is here.


#3

Many calendars throughout the world show the weeks as:
Mon-Tue-Wed-Thu-Fri-Sat-Sun, thereby making Sunday the 7th day of the week on the calendar.

And for practicall purposes, so do we in the U.S. make Sunday the last day, after all, it is the last day of the weeEND.

Since one day follows another, it’s pretty much a moot point which one you count as first and which you count as last. It’s for this reason that arguments about what day should be the Sabbath, for example, kind of baffle me. I say, just pick a day and make it the last day of your week.


#4

except that given its history, it would not be at all surprising if those places made Sunday the last day as an affront to Christianity, taking the prominence (even perceived prominence) away from Sunday.


#5

I was born in England, and I used those calendars as a child. Therefore, I simply assumed that Sunday was the seventh day and hence the Scriptural Sabbath! I was quite shocked when I discovered otherwise. I don’t see these calendars as anti-Christian in any way–if anyone should complain it should be Jews and SDAs.

Edwin


#6

I’ve lived several years in Europe, Germany and Italy. They use the same calander as we in America use. They go to Mass on Sunday, same as we do.


#7

Tom,

But is their Sunday the seventh daly on their calendar or the first day?


#8

When I was at a former job, the calendar on the computer showed the week starting with Monday and ending with Sunday. I did not find it unusual since the company was closed on weekends.


#9

I live in Slovakia (Central Europe). Our week starts with Monday and ends with Sunday, weekly worship services are held on Sunday. And don’t ask me why it is different from yours, I don’t know :slight_smile:


#10

antimon,

re: “I live in Slovakia (Central Europe). Our week starts with Monday and ends with Sunday, weekly worship services are held on Sunday. And don’t ask me why it is different from yours, I don’t know.”

You say your worship services are held on the seventh day of the week. In light of several verses in the New Testament that mention events that take place on the first of the week, may I ask if your church places any religious significance on the first day of the week?


#11

I work offshore, on a seven day on, and seven day off, schedule. The company (and other oil companies) distribute calendars based on Thursday being the “first day” of the week, since our work week begins on Thursday. So should we go to Mass on Wednesday? Perhaps I’m missing your point, but, does it really matter? Every day should be Holy. Mass is celebrated every day, not just Sunday. It doesn’t matter if Sunday is the first, second, third… or seventh day of the week.
Mark 2:23 And it came to pass again, as the Lord walked through the corn fields on the sabbath, that his disciples began to go forward, and to pluck the ears of corn. 24 And the Pharisees said to him: Behold, why do they on the sabbath day that which is not lawful? 25 And he said to them: Have you never read what David did when he had need, and was hungry himself, and they that were with him? 26 How he went into the house of God, under Abiathar the high priest, and did eat the loaves of proposition, which was not lawful to eat but for the priests, and gave to them who were with him? 27 And he said to them: The sabbath was made for man, and not man for the sabbath. 28 Therefore the Son of man is Lord of the sabbath also.


#12

Since it’s been awhile, perhaps someone new looking in will have an answer.


#13

Our week starts with Monday and ends on Sunday (Germany) So Sunday is the 7th day of the week, and the first day of the week is Monday on calendars. Liturgically Sunday is the 1st day of the week (as the Priest always says in prayer during the celebration of the Eucharist), because this was the day that Jesus resurrected. So Saturday remains the Sabbath, and our Priest says that we should keep the Sabbath as well as we could


#14

so yeah actually our calendar is wrong and the US-American calendar that starts with Sunday as the first day of the week is correct.


#15

When I was in the army, our training calendars ran Monday to Sunday. Reason being most of our exercises ran Fri-Sun so it was easier to see how different events were scheduled.

My work schedule for my current civilian job runs Sat to Fri.

I don't see it as being much different than having yearly calendars that differ based on what they need to do... like the actual calendar year (Jan-Dec), our military fiscal year (Apr-Mar), our military training year (Sep-Aug), etc etc.

Sunday is still the Lord's Day and Saturday is still the Sabbath. No jiggery-pokery is going to change that.

If I have any quibbles over the calendar, it's that we still use the names of pagan gods. Like Woden's Day and Tiw's Day. Like we couldn't have named them after some decent Biblical folk. Like Pelejoezelgibborabiadsarshalom. Or Dodo.

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#16

You know, I have a New Orleans Saints calendar that I recieve each year on Christmas :slight_smile: and still I have to pay attention to the days cause I messed up apps before lol. I can’t just put like “Dentist 3pm” at where there normally would be Wednesday but have to actually look at the date, otherwise I might show up a day earlier lol.


#17

Ah yes we naughty, naughty Europeans hey? Aren’t we just too wicked for words. :wink:


#18

this was discussed elsewhere but I don’t remember where tho. Oh wait it was about work on Sunday or something. I was about to reply to one poster that not every society (as he put it) doesn’t value Sunday as a holy day anymore as some European countries have our shops and everything closed on Sundays. Except for emergencies like hospitals, Vets and firefighters and the like of course. I kept it to myself though, lol.


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