Evidence for particular judgment?


#1

Ever since I started looking into Christianity and the bible in particular, I’ve found that there is precious little evidence of a particular judgment. From everything I’ve read it seems to indicate that there is only a general judgment, and that people do not enter heaven until that day. I fully accept extra biblical sources as a valid authority, however I cannot find any writings that pre date the third century that support a particular judgment.

If anyone could help I’d be much obliged

God bless
Levi


#2

[quote=levi86]Ever since I started looking into Christianity and the bible in particular, I’ve found that there is precious little evidence of a particular judgment. From everything I’ve read it seems to indicate that there is only a general judgment, and that people do not enter heaven until that day. I fully accept extra biblical sources as a valid authority, however I cannot find any writings that pre date the third century that support a particular judgment.

If anyone could help I’d be much obliged

God bless
Levi
[/quote]

www.newadvent.org/cathen/08550a.htm


#3

[quote=thistle]www.newadvent.org/cathen/08550a.htm
[/quote]

The passage mentioned in the link that says, “Christ represents Lazarus and Dives as receiving their respective rewards immediately after death,” refers to Luke 16:19-31.


#4

[quote=Todd Easton]The passage mentioned in the link that says, “Christ represents Lazarus and Dives as receiving their respective rewards immediately after death,” refers to Luke 16:19-31.
[/quote]

My Ignatius Catholic Study Bible comments:

Luke 16:22. “Abrahams bosom” i.e. in the lap or presence of Abraham, the forefather of Israel. It refers to a temporary realm within Hades where the righteous souls of the Old Covenant era waited patiently for Christ to open the doors of Heaven.

Luke 16:23. “Hades”. The netherworld or realm of the dead. It refers to a waiting place where the deceased souls of the wicked are detained until the Last Judgement. Here it stands opposite Abraham’s presence and is a place where sinners languish in the grip of torment. It is separated from the abode of the righteous by a permanent, unbridgeable gulf that permits no traffice to pass between them


#5

From the “Rosary Light And Light Page” article "Our Judgment Before God:

…What is more, there is no period of waiting for the Final Judgment. There is no “sleep” of the soul until it is awakened for the resurrection of the body. The New Testament alludes in a number of passages to an immediate reward or punishment after death. In the Parable of Lazarus and the Rich Man, Jesus presents Lazarus soon after his death in the bosom of Abraham, and the Rich Man in fiery punishment (Lk. 16:19-31). At His crucifixion, Jesus assures the Good Thief, “Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise” (Lk. 23:43). St. Paul speaks to the Philippians about his longing to remain with them, but also his desire “to depart and be with Christ,” implying an immediate union with the Lord after death (1:24). The Catechism summarizes well the definitive, apostolic teaching of the Church on this matter:

Each man receives his eternal retribution in his immortal soul at the very moment of his death, in a particular judgment that refers his life to Christ: either entrance into the blessedness of heaven - through a purification or immediately - or immediate and everlasting damnation (1022).
rosary-center.org/ll57n2.htm

This may also be helpful:
catholicapologetics.org/ap090100.htm#ap090101


#6

I too have puzzled over the justification for the Particular Judgement and the doctrine of the particular judgement is crucial as without it the doctrines of the saints in heaven, purgatory and indulgences would fall. As the New Advent link says “The Scriptural arguments in defence of the particular judgment must be indirect.” Indeed there is one passage that seem to imply the contrary; that we sleep after death until the second coming:

Job:14 - “But when a man dies, all vigour leaves him; when a man expires, where is he?” (verse 10) … “So men lie down and rise not again, till the heavens are no more, they shall not awake, nor be roused from their sleep.” (verse 12).

For me the passage in Philippians 1 where Paul wants to depart this life to be with Christ, but thinks it is better to stay for their sakes is very convincing (verses 23-24). If Paul were merely going be asleep when he died and not be immediately with Christ there would be no dilemma for him.

  I think one of our problems with trying to understand the after-life is just that – trying to *understand* it. With our philosophical western mind sets we want to understand things that are beyond our comprehension.

I remember discussing with someone what exists out side of our universe – nothing. If we were to go to the edge of the universe what exists on the other side of it – nothing. But what does that mean? The universe is expanding – but into what? If I blow up a balloon it expands into space, but outside the universe there is no time and space. So we stick a label on it – nothing – and think we have explained it. But just try and get your head around it. We can’t, it’s outside our experience and conceptual framework.

And I think it’s the same with what exists the other side of death. We use phrases like “God is out of time” and there is no time in heaven, purgatory or whatever. “Outside time” is outside of our conceptual framework and we cannot understand it.

We can say that after death, there is a judgement, heaven, hell, and for some a purification by something we call purgatory. We know that from our time based viewpoint Christ will come again and the world as we know it will come to an end. What all that looks and feels like from a heavenly viewpoint we cannot know or understand, whatever speculation or metaphors we come up with. Does everything happen in a sequence? Does it all appear to be happening at once? Is the word happening inappropriate?

I used to want understand everything before I would accept church teaching. But I’m slowly accepting that the magisterium and great theologians and saints of the past probably know more than me and I just have to take some things on trust… (Don’t worry this temporary touch of humility will pass and I’ll soon be back to my usual stroppy and argumentative self)


#7

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