Ewtn explaination


#1

I was just reading this and notice the first sentence of ¶ 2. IT says the “end of the world”. In proper translations isn’t that the “end of the age”. Jesus said I will be with you even until the end of the age?

Bill
:shrug:

Oops well better post a link.

ewtn.com/expert/expertfaqframe.asp


#2

So what is the question? The difference between “world” and “age?”

Aren’t they really the same thing, at least as far as we are concerned?


#3

If you consider what “age” means, which is basically the process from birth to death and apply this to the Universe the reasonable conclusion is that the term “end of the world” is interchangeable with “The end of the age” of the world or of the Universe.
remember people spoke differently back then, they did not have the concept of the “world” as we have now or even of the Universe, they had far less knowledge.
So when Jesus said to them the end of the age people understood “the end of the period of time that all people were collectively enjoying together”.
We on the other hand would speak of the end of the Universe or the world.



#4

Here are the translations I found on Bible Gateway:

Matthew 28:20
(KJV) 20 teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you. And lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world.”

(ASV) 20 teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I commanded you: and lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world.

(ESV) 20 teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

(AKJV) 20 teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world.

(LEB) 20 teaching them to observe everything I have commanded you, and behold, I am with you all the days until the end of the age.”

(English-Greek Interlinear)
20 teaching didaskō them autos to observe tēreō everything pas that hosos I have commanded entellō you hymeis. And kai remember idou, I egō am eimi with meta you hymeis all pas the ho days hēmera, to heōs the ho end synteleia of ho eons aiōn.

The word aeon, also spelled eon, originally means “life” or “being”, though it has come to carry the implication of time, ex: end of time.

English Bible translations most often translate aeon to indicate eternity, being translated as eternal, everlasting, forever, etc. However, there are notable exceptions to this in all major translations, such as Mat 28:20 “…I am with you always, to the end of the age” (NRSV), the word “age” being a translation of aion. Rendering aion to indicate eternality in this verse would result in the contradictory phrase “end of eternity”, so the question arises whether it should ever be so.
Mat 25:46 Then they will go away to eternal punishment, but the righteous to eternal life. (NIV)
These will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life. (NASB)
And these shall go away into everlasting punishment, but the righteous into eternal life. (KJV)


#5

No not at all. This is like the “something” millennium of the 5th age or creation. The new creation began with the flood story.


#6

This should help clear it up:

(English-Greek Interlinear)
Matthew 28:20
20 teaching didaskō them autos to observe tēreō everything pas that hosos I have commanded entellō you hymeis. And kai remember idou, I egō am eimi with meta you hymeis all pas the ho days hēmera, to heōs the ho end synteleia of ho eons aiōn.

The word aeon, also spelled eon, originally means “life” or “being”, though it has come to carry the implication of time, ex: end of time.

English Bible translations most often translate aeon to indicate eternity, being translated as eternal, everlasting, forever, etc. However, there are notable exceptions to this in all major translations, such as Mat 28:20 “…I am with you always, to the end of the age” (NRSV), the word “age” being a translation of aion. Rendering aion to indicate eternality in this verse would result in the contradictory phrase “end of eternity”, so the question arises whether it should ever be so.
Mat 25:46 Then they will go away to eternal punishment, but the righteous to eternal life. (NIV)
These will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life. (NASB)
And these shall go away into everlasting punishment, but the righteous into eternal life. (KJV)


#7

I know in Judaism that this earth will be destroyed by fire. The last earth was destroyed by water. The next maybe by wind. :shrug:


#8

Don’t know if it will help, but here’s an Appendix to the Companion Bible that addresses this question, starting at #2.

therain.org/appendixes/app129.html


#9

Interesting thanks for the link.

Bill


#10

The word translated as ‘world’ and ‘age’ is aiōn (where we get the word ‘aeon’ from). It literally does mean ‘age’, ‘lifespan’ or ‘time’, but traditionally there was this tendency in English to translate this word (and the Latin word saeculum, which pretty has a similar range of meaning as the Greek word) as ‘world’.

That’s why we say, ‘world without end’ in the Glory Be. That is from the Latin word in saecula saeculorum, which in turn is from the Greek eis tous aiōnas tōn aiōnōn. This expression ultimately comes from Hebrew. Translated literally, it would mean “to (the) ages of (the) ages.” But the meaning is simply just, “forever and ever.”


#11

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