EWTN-type Holy Mass


#1

Okay, I started a thread on this but it died quickly.
Do you have an EWTN type Holy Mass at your parish?
Do you know of one in your Diocese?
Not Traditional, but traditions.

If you would not mind, please post what Diocese it is in.


#2

You mean a “N.O.-L.M.”, right??


#3

[quote=jlw]You mean a “N.O.-L.M.”, right??
[/quote]

No. We have a Latin Holy Mass on Wednesdays at our parish. It is totally in Latin.
I mean a Sunday mass where Latin is used, like for the Gloria and the Agnus Dei.
Kind of the opposite of a Charistmatic mass.
A good “Deep Catholic” Holy Mass.


#4

As I might have said in another thread, our parish has 4 masses on sunday, 9, 11, 1, and 5:30. The 11o’clock is the “Latin Mass”. It isn’t ALL in Latin. But the gregoran chant throughout the Mass from our chior is, and there is a procession (with reverent altar boys, thank you*) and incense.* The priest faces us like the NO.

Confession usually before the 9 and 11 masses. Always a line.

THe penitental rite we say in english.
The Kyrie is sung in Latin chant
The Gloria is sung in Latin chant
The scripture readings and responsorial is in english
The Gospel is either said or sung in english
The homily is in english
The Credo is sung in Latin chant
The intercesional prayers are in english
Sanctus sung in latin
The Eucharistic prayers are either in english or latin
The Mystery of Faith in Latin
The Our Father is sung in Latin (usually)

(we only do the Kiss of Peace on holidays usually)

Agnus Dei is sung in Latin
"I am not worthy…" said in Latin (usually)

No EMCs. Two priests misister the hosts at the altar rail to kneeling parishioners (usually) on the tongue.

Concluding rite in english.


#5

[quote=jlw]As I might have said in another thread, our parish has 4 masses on sunday, 9, 11, 1, and 5:30. The 11o’clock is the “Latin Mass”. It isn’t ALL in Latin. But the gregoran chant throughout the Mass from our chior is, and there is a procession (with reverent altar boys, thank you*) and incense.* The priest faces us like the NO.

Confession usually before the 9 and 11 masses. Always a line.

THe penitental rite we say in english.
The Kyrie is sung in Latin chant
The Gloria is sung in Latin chant
The scripture readings and responsorial is in english
The Gospel is either said or sung in english
The homily is in english
The Credo is sung in Latin chant
The intercesional prayers are in english
Sanctus sung in latin
The Eucharistic prayers are either in english or latin
The Mystery of Faith in Latin
The Our Father is sung in Latin (usually)

(we only do the Kiss of Peace on holidays usually)

Agnus Dei is sung in Latin
"I am not worthy…" said in Latin (usually)

No EMCs. Two priests misister the hosts at the altar rail to kneeling parishioners (usually) on the tongue.

Concluding rite in english.
[/quote]

That is what every one of our Holy Masses is like.
When I say this to people, they think I’m crazy for loving it. I was just wondering if any other church is doing the same. It’s good news to see some here.

(anyone know of a church in Cleveland doing it, for when I visit back home?)


#6

Latin does not make a Mass more reverent, more “Deep Catholic”. Just ain’t so.


#7

[quote=rcn]Latin does not make a Mass more reverent, more “Deep Catholic”. Just ain’t so.
[/quote]

Hmmm…heres some interesting quotes from Vatican II. I think all of us could find these useful…

All quotes come from Sacrosantum Concilium

"34. The rites should be distinguished by a noble simplicity; they should be short, clear, and unencumbered by useless repetitions; they should be within the people’s powers of comprehension, and normally should not require much explanation.

    1. Particular law remaining in force, the use of the Latin language is to be preserved in the Latin rites.
  1. But since the use of the mother tongue, whether in the Mass, the administration of the sacraments, or other parts of the liturgy, frequently may be of great advantage to the people, the limits of its employment may be extended. This will apply in the first place to the readings and directives, and to some of the prayers and chants, according to the regulations on this matter to be laid down separately in subsequent chapters.

  2. These norms being observed, it is for the competent territorial ecclesiastical authority mentioned in Art. 22, 2, to decide whether, and to what extent, the vernacular language is to be used; their decrees are to be approved, that is, confirmed, by the Apostolic See. And, whenever it seems to be called for, this authority is to consult with bishops of neighboring regions which have the same language.

  3. Translations from the Latin text into the mother tongue intended for use in the liturgy must be approved by the competent territorial ecclesiastical authority mentioned above."

So, in a sense, it is more “Deep Catholic” to use some Latin, as it is prescribed by the council. Vatican II did not obliterate Latin from the mass, but simply made it understandable to people. We all know what the parts of mass say, so why not say them in Latin? Ultimately the use of Latin in the mass is regulated by the Bishop of dioceses, but it kept in check by other bishops and Rome.
God Bless,

Justin


#8

ewtn.com/pilgrimage/gallery/index.asp

9th row, 2nd picture. Looks like the Shrine there is even more conservative.


#9

[quote=rcn]Latin does not make a Mass more reverent, more “Deep Catholic”. Just ain’t so.
[/quote]

Maybe you don’t feel it…

Latin may not make a Mass more reverent, but it makes the people attending that Holy Mass feel more reverent.

Just like some people “Feel Jesus” more at a Charistmatic mass, Others feel Our Lord much more at a Deep Catholic mass.

We should be allowed both, but parishes in my area Kumbaya more than they Agnus Dei.

(and watch how quickly you are shunned if you bring it up)


#10

did not reply because I have no idea what you mean by this question. Every parish I have lived in over the last 35 years has celebrated the order of the Mass promulgated by the Vatican. Since I do not attend schismatic churches I have no other experience. These Masses, like the Masses I see occassionally on EWTN, are celebrated according to the rubrics and norms established by the universal Church for the Latin Rite. Sometimes the prayers of the Mass are sung or recited all or in part in Latin, sometimes in the vernacular - which may not always be English.

Sometimes over the years in some times and places I have seen abuses, disregard for the norms, and even on occassion flagrantly illicit usages, but never to my knowledge (except on two possible occassions which were reported to the bishop and promply corrected) have I seen any action that would render the consecration invalid.
Far more common are to see, even occassionally on EWTN, members of the congregation who appear to be uninvolved and indifferent to the entire celebration. however, in charity, I will simply assume that someone who appears to be distancing themselves from the public worship is in fact in an advanced contemplative state.

I have experienced charistmatic Masses, Life Teen Masses, children’s liturgies, polka Masses, Mariachi Masses, indult Tridentine Rite Masses, and Masses stripped to their bare essentials (as in certain retreat centers). I have experienced sublime music, inspiring sermons, and on rare occassions, readings by lectors who know how to proclaim the Word properly. More often the music is lackluster by ill-trained, untalented singers and musicians, led by cantors without liturgical music traning or even average musical ability–to my mind the single most persistent liturgical abuse inflicted upon the long-suffering laity.

I don’t know if you are asking about the peripherals of the celebration, or the essentials, so your poll choices make no sense.

However, irregardless of the ancillary attributes of the celebration, every Mass has proclaimed the Word of God, praised God, and rendered Jesus Christ sacramentally present and therefore have been miracles and gifts of incalculable worth and beauty.


#11

[quote=netmilsmom]Latin may not make a Mass more reverent, but it makes the people attending that Holy Mass feel more reverent.

[/quote]

I’m sure you meant to say “some of” the people. When I attend a Mass where parts are said in Latin, I see people looking around at each other or flipping through their missaslette looking for the words or the translation, which they never find. To most it is just another foreign language.

So I would say Latin makes most people feel confused.


#12

[quote=rcn]I’m sure you meant to say “some of” the people. When I attend a Mass where parts are said in Latin, I see people looking around at each other or flipping through their missaslette looking for the words or the translation, which they never find. To most it is just another foreign language.

So I would say Latin makes most people feel confused.
[/quote]

I stand corrected.
“Some of” the people might be correct but I would have to say “most of” for those who choose to come to one of these Holy Masses.
At our Parish, we have sheets in each pew to help one with the Latin. Father announces before Holy Mass begins, for those visiting, this fact. There is no flipping through the Missalette, there is no need. Each part in Latin is clearly marked at the top in English.

One day I sat with a young woman who sang the Latin with the voice of an Angel. I closed my eyes and felt like I was in heaven! But honestly, hearing my five year old sing the Agnus Dei brings tears to my eyes.


#13

I would love to have such a Mass at a local parish, but I have never seen or heard of anything in the parishes in my part of Massachusetts.

However, in Still River (Harvard MA) there is St. Benedict’s which is a community of monks and nuns (Slaves of the Immaculate Heart of Mary). The sisters have a TLM every Sunday while the brothers have the NO mass but completely in Latin (except readings and homily) with Gregorian chant and incense. It is a bit of a drive from where I live but I go there occasionally when I feel the need to remember what the liturgy was (and should be) like.

I personally would prefer the EWTN style with most of the Mass in english but more of it sung and the parts such as the Kyrie, Gloria, Sanctus, etc. in Latin. Also the Pater Noster.

At least our local parish does sing the PN (in english) using the traditional setting.

Jon


#14

[quote=puzzleannie]did not reply because I have no idea what you mean by this question.
[/quote]

Jlw explains the meaning of an EWTN Holy Mass in Post #4.


#15

[quote=jlw]As I might have said in another thread, our parish has 4 masses on sunday, 9, 11, 1, and 5:30. The 11o’clock is the “Latin Mass”. It isn’t ALL in Latin. But the gregoran chant throughout the Mass from our chior is, and there is a procession (with reverent altar boys, thank you*) and incense.* The priest faces us like the NO.

Confession usually before the 9 and 11 masses. Always a line.

THe penitental rite we say in english.
The Kyrie is sung in Latin chant
The Gloria is sung in Latin chant
The scripture readings and responsorial is in english
The Gospel is either said or sung in english
The homily is in english
The Credo is sung in Latin chant
The intercesional prayers are in english
Sanctus sung in latin
The Eucharistic prayers are either in english or latin
The Mystery of Faith in Latin
The Our Father is sung in Latin (usually)

(we only do the Kiss of Peace on holidays usually)

Agnus Dei is sung in Latin
"I am not worthy…" said in Latin (usually)

No EMCs. Two priests misister the hosts at the altar rail to kneeling parishioners (usually) on the tongue.

Concluding rite in english.
[/quote]

The Kyrie is supposed to be in GREEK!!


#16

Darn, you beat me to it.

The only things I notice a difference from EWTN in our parish is that we don’t sing the Gloria, Santus, etc in Latin; we have about a 50/50 split on handholders, and same on receiving on the tongue.

I agree with Puzzleannie, just didn’t want to drag the whole thing down.

[quote=Pariah Pirana]The Kyrie is supposed to be in GREEK!!
[/quote]


#17

That’s the problem. Some of us want the Latin and Greek. In fact, with the way our parish is growing, many of us want our Liturgy to include this.

Look at a quote from Puzzleannie…
“I have experienced charistmatic Masses, Life Teen Masses, children’s liturgies, polka Masses, Mariachi Masses, indult Tridentine Rite Masses, and Masses stripped to their bare essentials (as in certain retreat centers).”

What do you notice there?
Not a single one is an N.O. Mass with Latin and Greek, the EWTN type mass. The Indult is not allowed in all Diocese and if it is, it’s in a Downtown parish, not our home parishes. Those who want a more traditional Holy Mass are driving or out of luck.

It’s easy to say to us, just go with the flow and get used to the way we do things now, but while you can walk into any Catholic Church and feel comfortable, when I walk in there, I see less of the Holy Mass than I saw at the local Lutheran church.

And actually, this statement from the same poster…

“However, irregardless of the ancillary attributes of the celebration, every Mass has proclaimed the Word of God, praised God, and rendered Jesus Christ sacramentally present and therefore have been miracles and gifts of incalculable worth and beauty.”

states exactly what I am saying. If the Vatican declared that all masses should be in Latin, how comfortable would you be? The masses in my Diocese are foreign to me, but I just need to accept it, per this poster.
Looking at the responses on the poll, others would like some Latin as well.


#18

The Indult is not allowed in all Diocese and if it is, it’s in a Downtown parish, not our home parishes. Those who want a more traditional Holy Mass are driving or out of luck.

Our parish is such a parish you describe. Many, families drive anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour to attend, and most will say it’s worth it because their local parish isn’t…what’s the word??


#19

[quote=jlw]Our parish is such a parish you describe. Many, families drive anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour to attend, and most will say it’s worth it because their local parish isn’t…what’s the word??
[/quote]

I call those parishes, Kumbaya Catholic.
They call themselves Communities and think they are conservative!!

BTW, we have families driving the same about and we don’t even have the TLM. We do have a Rosary before Holy Mass, May Crowning and Corpus Christi.
Our Wonderful Pastor even mentions (hold your breath) MARY in our homilies!


#20

[quote=Pariah Pirana]The Kyrie is supposed to be in GREEK!!
[/quote]

Oops!! Wrote that wrong…Of course it is!! :o


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