Exact moment I became a Catholic?


#1

As some of you may know I joined the Church last Easter but was baptized Episcopalian as an infant. Was I technically “made a Catholic,” so to speak, and remain out of full communion with the Church by virtue of my baptism in the Episcopal Church, since it was in the Trinitarian form, and just come into full communion with the Church when I was confirmed and received the Eucharist? Or was I not Catholic at all ever since my infant baptism, and then I completely became Catholic, all at once, when I was confirmed and received the Eucharist?


#2

The first, you were baptised into the Church but were less than fully in communion until you were confirmed last Easter. Welcome Home.

God Bless,

CARose


#3

Because you were baptized in the Name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit you were Christian, but not Catholic. You entered the Catholic Church at the time of your Confirmation.

God Bless,
Matt


#4

[quote=marty1818]Because you were baptized in the Name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit you were Christian, but not Catholic. You entered the Catholic Church at the time of your Confirmation.

God Bless,
Matt
[/quote]

Even though Jesus intended the Trinitarian baptism for use in the Catholic Church, which He founded, and not for any other denomination or some vague concept of “Christianity”?


#5

He made a mistake. When any infant is baptised, whether by a Catholic priest, protestant, or even a pagan, and the Trinitarian formula is used, that infant is a Catholic. Baptism belongs to the Catholic Church.

So, you were a Catholic as an infant, and remained so until you reached the age at which you accepted errors. At the point you accepted and followed the Episcopal teachings that happened to be contrary to the Catholic Church, then you became a separated member, through no fault of your own. That was probably anywhere from 7 to 13 and up.

Finally, you came into full communion again (welcome home!) at Easter time, according to your own witness.

hurst


#6

[quote=hurst]He made a mistake. When any infant is baptised, whether by a Catholic priest, protestant, or even a pagan, and the Trinitarian formula is used, that infant is a Catholic. Baptism belongs to the Catholic Church.

So, you were a Catholic as an infant, and remained so until you reached the age at which you accepted errors. At the point you accepted and followed the Episcopal teachings that happened to be contrary to the Catholic Church, then you became a separated member, through no fault of your own. That was probably anywhere from 7 to 13 and up.

Finally, you came into full communion again (welcome home!) at Easter time, according to your own witness.

hurst
[/quote]

Voted best post on the issue so far.


#7

Hi CollegeKid,

Let’s clear this up. Through your baptism you became by rights a member of the Holy Roman Catholic Church. In theory, you could have walked into any Catholic Church, go to confession, receive communion and start living as a Catholic.

But of course this could lead to all kinds of misunderstandings and unpleasantness. The Church has to make sure that you accept the basic truths of Catholicism, accept its moral teachings and understand the sacraments. That is why you are required to receive a minimum amount of instruction.

Verbum


#8

[quote=CollegeKid]As some of you may know I joined the Church last Easter but was baptized Episcopalian as an infant. Was I technically “made a Catholic,” so to speak, and remain out of full communion with the Church by virtue of my baptism in the Episcopal Church, since it was in the Trinitarian form, and just come into full communion with the Church when I was confirmed and received the Eucharist? Or was I not Catholic at all ever since my infant baptism, and then I completely became Catholic, all at once, when I was confirmed and received the Eucharist?
[/quote]

When Baptized you became a **Christian. **You became an Episcopalian when you began accepting the teachings or practicing in the Episcopal denomination. You became a Catholic when you made a public profession of accepting all the teachings of the Catholic Church and accepted the Catholic Church as the true Church of Christ. You were confirmed in your Catholic faith with the Sacrament of Confirmation, prior to the Sacrament your were already practicing the Catholic faith.


#9

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]When Baptized you became a **Christian. **You became an Episcopalian when you began accepting the teachings or practicing in the Episcopal denomination. You became a Catholic when you made a public profession of accepting all the teachings of the Catholic Church and accepted the Catholic Church as the true Church of Christ. You were confirmed in your Catholic faith with the Sacrament of Confirmation, prior to the Sacrament your were already practicing the Catholic faith.
[/quote]

Does this mean someone going through RCIA who has already been baptized, but not yet gone to confession or received the Eucharist or been confirmed is ‘Catholic’ if they have publicly professed their acceptance of the teachings of the Church and accepted the Church as the Church of Christ? Maybe it hinges on what is meant by ‘publicly’? Does publicly mean during the Easter Vigil when asked by the priest in front of the parish? (our parish does this - not sure if everyone does…?)


#10

[quote=Elzee]Does this mean someone going through RCIA who has already been baptized, but not yet gone to confession or received the Eucharist or been confirmed is ‘Catholic’ if they have publicly professed their acceptance of the teachings of the Church and accepted the Church as the Church of Christ? Maybe it hinges on what is meant by ‘publicly’? Does publicly mean during the Easter Vigil when asked by the priest in front of the parish? (our parish does this - not sure if everyone does…?)
[/quote]

That profession is part of the Rite. A persons relationship or standing in relation the Catholic Church changes with the Rites of Acceptance, Welcome, Election, Initiation (celebration fo the Sacraments)


#11

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