Exactly which forms of the Deuterocanonical books are considered inspired?


#1

I've noticed that there are several different forms of the DC books extant. Some longer, some shorter, some Greek, some Hebrew. The question of which forms the Church considers canonical is also complicated by the fact that, with Daniel and Esther, longer forms that contain Greek and Hebrew (with the Greek added in later) are considered canonical and thus inspired. So it could be argued that maybe the form represented by the Greek Sirach is actually the inspired one, and not the critical edition compiled with the Hebrew texts found. So... discuss.


#2

I think it's a both/and situation. Like the doxology ("For the Kingdom, the Power and the Glory are Yours...") of the Lord's prayer at mass. The doxology is not found in all ancient manuscripts, so it is included, but only after the Celebrant intones "Deliver us, Lord from all evil..."


#3

It’s pretty simple. Any translation approved by the Church is Canonical. The language issue was decided by experts long ago, thereby saving us immense time and trouble!

The Catholic Church: a full-service institution!


#4

=WoundedIcon;10306697]I've noticed that there are several different forms of the DC books extant. Some longer, some shorter, some Greek, some Hebrew. The question of which forms the Church considers canonical is also complicated by the fact that, with Daniel and Esther, longer forms that contain Greek and Hebrew (with the Greek added in later) are considered canonical and thus inspired. So it could be argued that maybe the form represented by the Greek Sirach is actually the inspired one, and not the critical edition compiled with the Hebrew texts found. So... discuss.

According to God Himself [2nd. Tim. 3:16]

Every book included in the Original canon of the Bible and found in the Latin Vulgate and the Douay Bible are there because God put them there. End of topic in God's Opinion:thumbsup:

pat/PJM


#5

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