Examples of Roman Catholic churches built in traditional styles from 1965-1990?


#1

I am trying to see if there are any examples of Roman/Latin Church churches built in a traditional style from 1965ish to 1990ish. I have found none so far, which is wholly unsurprising, but surely there are some?

Does anyone know of any? I would prefer if they would be American or Canadian, as that is what I am familiar with, and also because it can probably be said that these places were the most "extreme" in the post-conciliar mania.

Any glittering jewels in the rough?


#2

Apologies for not answering the question but I thought you may be interested to read of this research proposal that is looking at the RC architecture in the Uk and will eventually culminate in publication of a book:

futurereligiousheritage.eu/uk-project-roman-catholic-church-architecture-in-britain-1955-75/

There is also a fascinating book called “A glimpse of heaven” by Christopher Martin which looks at all Catholic Churches in the UK. What’s interesting to note is the diversity of architectual styles that developed in each century, and that there were some radical designs early in the 20th century!


#3

[quote="YoungTradCath, post:1, topic:300996"]
I am trying to see if there are any examples of Roman/Latin Church churches built in a traditional style from 1965ish to 1990ish. I have found none so far, which is wholly unsurprising, but surely there are some?

Does anyone know of any? I would prefer if they would be American or Canadian, as that is what I am familiar with, and also because it can probably be said that these places were the most "extreme" in the post-conciliar mania.

Any glittering jewels in the rough?

[/quote]

Haven't seen any... :)


#4

What do you mean by "traditional style"?


#5

[quote="ConstantineTG, post:4, topic:300996"]
What do you mean by "traditional style"?

[/quote]

My question too. :confused:


#6

[quote="ConstantineTG, post:4, topic:300996"]
What do you mean by "traditional style"?

[/quote]

Early Christian, Romanesque, Byzantine (sometimes is used for Latin churches), Gothic, Baroque, amalgamations of these and so on.

:confused:


#7

St. Albert The Great Catholic Church 1995

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2464/3729861365_ef00560084.jpg

http://abvmcalgary.com/abvmcalgary/images/stories/abvm/Centennial-Gallery/vsig_images/assumption%20ukrainian%20catholic%20church%20calgary_414_310_90.jpg

http://abvmcalgary.com/abvmcalgary/images/stories/abvm/Articles/interior%20from%20loft%20dec09.jpg
Assumption Church built in 1959

Ongoing renovations and expansion to Sacred Heart Church (current)
http://www.sacredheartcalgary.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/SacredHeart-new.gif


#8

Realistically gothic, Baroque etc are far too exspensive styles for the average parish to afford.

Simple Romanesque may be within some parishes means.

Even our cathedral built in the 50s is modern for that time.


#9

How about St Joseph's Basilica in Edmonton, Alberta? This was built in 1963 (okay 2 years before your date...)
http://www.stjosephbasilica.com/images/home.jpg
http://www.stjosephbasilica.com/images/entry_view.jpg


#10

triumphguy, is that your local UGCC parish? I love the inside!


#11

[quote="YoungTradCath, post:6, topic:300996"]
Early Christian, Romanesque, Byzantine (sometimes is used for Latin churches), Gothic, Baroque, amalgamations of these and so on.

:confused:

[/quote]

I'm asking because my last RC parish is 100 years old and yet the architecture is typical Protestant parish around the same era.


#12

[quote="ConstantineTG, post:10, topic:300996"]
triumphguy, is that your local UGCC parish? I love the inside!

[/quote]

Yes, and it is beautiful, and the singing is magnificent.


#13

[quote="andrewstx, post:8, topic:300996"]
Realistically gothic, Baroque etc are far too exspensive styles for the average parish to afford.

Simple Romanesque may be within some parishes means.

Even our cathedral built in the 50s is modern for that time.

[/quote]

This is what I was thinking too. If the YTC simply meant a cross style or a single long nave (ie not round or half round) than I've got plenty of examples. But the interior decorations and altars are much plainer than those TG is posting.


#14

Our Lady of the Atonement, San Antonio, opened in the early 1980s:
atonementonline.com/sanctuary.php


#15

[quote="daizies, post:9, topic:300996"]
how about st joseph's basilica in edmonton, alberta? This was built in 1963 (okay 2 years before your date...)
http://www.stjosephbasilica.com/images/home.jpg
http://www.stjosephbasilica.com/images/entry_view.jpg

[/quote]

wow thats beautiful!!


#16

I know this is before your date, but its the Cathedral that is located about an hour from us, in London, Ontario...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Peter's_Cathedral_Basilica,_London

Its a VERY beautiful Cathedral, I love to go inside and Pray when I visit the city...


#17

I would suggest you look up the Cathedral of St. Joseph the Workman in La Crosse, WI. Built in 1962, it is a modern, neo-gothic design.
[ATTACH]15115[/ATTACH]

[ATTACH]15116[/ATTACH]


#18

When I visitied it a few months ago, I was told that Holy Family in Fort Worth was the first church built after Vatican II. It’s modern but still “traditional”. It’s kind of cruciform in its layout, with three sections of pews (east, south, west), an elevated altar in the middle, and a choir loft with the most awesome organ behind the altar (north). (PICTURE) If I remember correctly, the tall stained glass you can see in the picture linked above has small scenes. The one I remember the most is blood from a lamb spilling into a chalice. The baptism font is on the east side of the church (FONT). There are three statues - one of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, one of the Virgin Mary, and one of the Holy family. If it weren’t on the other side of town, I would consider going there on a regular basis.


#19

[quote="triumphguy, post:12, topic:300996"]
Yes, and it is beautiful, and the singing is magnificent.

[/quote]

I love that their main Liturgy is English. Are there many people who come to this parish? Are they mostly Ukrainians or from different ethnic background?


#20

In Toronto: St. Michael's Cathedral, St. Lawrence Martyr, St. Benedict, St. Vincent de Paul


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