Examples of Sacred Tradition


#1

Besides the bible canon, what are some examples of Sacred Tradition?


#2
  • The trinity
  • The incarnation
  • Infant baptism and baptismal regeneration
  • The real presence of Christ in the Eucharist and the Eucharistic sacrifice
  • Mary’s perpetual virginity, great holiness, and dormition
  • Prayer for the dead
  • Veneration and intercession of Mary and the saints
  • Liturgical worship

#3

[quote="Trebor135, post:2, topic:324773"]
- The trinity
- The incarnation
- Infant baptism and baptismal regeneration
- The real presence of Christ in the Eucharist and the Eucharistic sacrifice
- Mary's perpetual virginity, great holiness, and dormition
- Prayer for the dead
- Veneration and intercession of Mary and the saints
- Liturgical worship

[/quote]

Liturgical worship has it's basis in Sacred Scripture as well as Sacred Tradition. God revealed liturgical worship to the Israelites in the Old Testament, most notably Leviticus and Numbers.

Prayers for the dead is explicit in the Bible. Reference 2 Maccabees 12:38-46.

Many of the others listed have some basis in Sacred Scripture. We can't always see the references clearly because we don't have the context of being a first century Jew for whom much of the Bible was written and by whom most of the Bible is written.

Even Mary's perpetual virginity and immaculate conception is found in Sacred Scripture, for those who know how the Jews viewed marriage, the Arc of the Covenant, birthrights and the firstborn son, and the role of the queen in the ancient world. Again, we can't always see it because we have no reference point. It sometimes takes "Jewish glasses" to see the Bible as an early Jew would have and then some of these things literally jump out as one reads the Bible.

-Tim-


#4

Sacred Tradition is the whole Word of God, not just a few separate items, extra from the Bible.

Here is how Pope Francis recently explained it:

“Sacred Scripture is the Word of God in that it is written down under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. Sacred Tradition, instead, transmits the Word of God in its entirety, entrusted by Christ the Lord and by the Holy Spirit to the Apostles and their successors, so that these, enlightened by the Spirit of truth, might faithfully preserve it with their preaching, might expound and propound it.”


#5

I take it that you mean Sacred Tradition not found expressly stated in Sacred Scripture, if I am wrong then I apologize, but if this is what you mean then here is a short list:

-The martyrdoms of the twelve apostles
- The names of Mary's mother and father
- The names of the two revolutionists who were crucified on either side of Christ
- The Trinity (yes, there are references to the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit throughout the bible but never is the doctrine of the Trinity clearly stated)
- Jesus falling three times on the way to Golgotha, the bible is never really clear on how many times he fell
- The names of the three kings who brought gifts to the Christ Child, or if it was just three
- The order of the mass (this is really first mentioned in the Didache, not the bible)
-Speaking of the Didache, the end of the Lord's prayer that is said in Mass.

- The function of the Bishops (hinted at in the Bible especially in the writings of Paul, but not spelled out by Clement, Ignatius, and Iranaeus).
- Infant baptism, hinted at in Acts, but not spelled out


#6

[quote="TimothyH, post:3, topic:324773"]
Liturgical worship has it's basis in Sacred Scripture as well as Sacred Tradition. God revealed liturgical worship to the Israelites in the Old Testament, most notably Leviticus and Numbers.

Prayers for the dead is explicit in the Bible. Reference 2 Maccabees 12:38-46.

Many of the others listed have some basis in Sacred Scripture. We can't always see the references clearly because we don't have the context of being a first century Jew for whom much of the Bible was written and by whom most of the Bible is written.

Even Mary's perpetual virginity and immaculate conception is found in Sacred Scripture, for those who know how the Jews viewed marriage, the Arc of the Covenant, birthrights and the firstborn son, and the role of the queen in the ancient world. Again, we can't always see it because we have no reference point. It sometimes takes "Jewish glasses" to see the Bible as an early Jew would have and then some of these things literally jump out as one reads the Bible.

-Tim-

[/quote]

Hi TimothyH,

Perhaps I didn’t understand your point; was it these are not exclusively Sacred Tradition pointed out by Trebor135?

If that is the case, what are some examples of exclusive Sacred Traditions?


#7

I’m happy to be corrected on this but most of these that you’ve pointed out are traditions with a lower case “t” not Sacred Tradition with a capital “T”.

I’m still learning what are the actual teachings of Sacred Traditions per se :shrug:


#8

I should clarify that the items included in my list, as I see it, may have good, even strong, testimony in Scripture, but the correct understanding of the whole faith, no matter the issue in question, can be found in Tradition. Which is why Oneness Pentecostals can be fundamentally Protestant but also Modalist–they lack the key to interpreting the Bible correctly, causing them to go astray from the content of historical Christianity.


#9

If I’m not mistaken the mixing of water and wine during mass is considered to be an ancient practice. I’m not sure if it’s Apostolic or Ecclesiastical tradition?


#10

This living transmission, accomplished in the Holy Spirit, is called Tradition, since it is distinct from Sacred Scripture, though closely connected to it. Through Tradition, "the Church, in her doctrine, **life* and worship, perpetuates and transmits to every generation all that she herself is, all that she believes – CCC 78*

What is meant by the life of the Church?


#11

Ancestor worship/Veneration of the dead, seems to be a tradition that could be of the nature of a Sacred Tradition. Blessed John Paul in his book Crossing the Threshold of Hope says…

*At this point, it seems opportune to recall all the primitive religions, the Animist type of religion, which puts first emphasis on the worship of their ancestors. It seems that those who practice it are particularly close to Christianity. Among them the missionaries of the Church more easily find a common language.

Is there, perhaps, in this veneration of the ancestors a kind of preparation for the Christian belief in the communion of saints, wherein all believers - whether living or dead - form a single community, a single body? Faith in the communion of the saints is, ultimately, faith in Christ, the only source of life and holiness for all.

There is nothing strange, then, in the fact that the African and Asian animists would become confessors of Christ more easily than followers of the great religions of the Far East.*

(John Paul II, Varcare la Soglia della Speranza, Milan: Mondatori, 1994, p. 90)

Also the principle of Baptism of Desire which can mean a person is justified by their faithfulness and obedience to God without express knowledge of Bible or Christian Tradition, seems to allow for a sacredness of belief that is ignorant of those.


#12

[quote="Augustine3, post:10, topic:324773"]
This living transmission, accomplished in the Holy Spirit, is called Tradition, since it is distinct from Sacred Scripture, though closely connected to it. Through Tradition, "the Church, in her doctrine, **life** and worship, perpetuates and transmits to every generation all that she herself is, all that she believes – CCC 78

What is meant by the life of the Church?

[/quote]

Wow I am also curious! My personal thought is that the life is the liturgy itself, I'm not sure?


#13

I suppose I’m trying to say Baptism of Desire is a Sacred Tradition based in natural law rather than in Bible law.


#14

I would say that Baptism of Desire comes directly from scripture.

First with St. Dismas on the Cross.

credobiblestudy.com/roman/en/catholic-bible-douay-rheims-nt-book-luke-lk-chapter-23/49/23/43

And more clearly with St Peter at the house of Corneilus. Where the Spirit came down on the Gentiles even before their water baptism…

credobiblestudy.com/roman/en/catholic-bible-douay-rheims-nt-book-acts-of-apostles-acts-chapter-10/51/10/47


#15

The sacrament of Reconciliation as well would be considered part of Sacred Tradition as well correct? As there is no full mention of it in the Bible.


#16

Does anybody know?

I’ve asked this question before in another thread but no one answered.

This question has been bugging me for a while so I would really appreciate it if someone help me out?


#17

=Augustine3;10684862]Besides the bible canon, what are some examples of Sacred Tradition?

One God: Exodus 16:12
I have heard the murmuring of the children of Israel: say to them: In the evening you shall eat flesh, and in the morning you shall have your fill of bread: and you shall know that I am the Lord your God.

With Only One Faith Exodus 15:26
Saying: If thou wilt hear the voice of the Lord thy God, and do what is right before him, and obey his commandments, and keep all his precepts, none of the evils that I laid upon Egypt, will I bring upon thee: for I am the Lord thy healer.

and Only One choosen people [church in the NT] Exodus 3:12
And he said to him: I will be with thee: and this thou shalt have for a sign, that I have sent thee: When thou shalt have brought my people out of Egypt, thou shalt offer sacrifice to God upon this mountain.

LED BY ONE MAN Genesis 17:5
Neither shall thy name be called any more Abram: but thou shalt be called Abraham: because I have made thee a father of many nations.

Abram; Moses; David; Jacob; the Judges and Prophets; Jesus Himself then Peter


#18

[quote="irenaeuslyons, post:14, topic:324773"]
I would say that Baptism of Desire comes directly from scripture.

First with St. Dismas on the Cross.

credobiblestudy.com/roman/en/catholic-bible-douay-rheims-nt-book-luke-lk-chapter-23/49/23/43

And more clearly with St Peter at the house of Corneilus. Where the Spirit came down on the Gentiles even before their water baptism....

credobiblestudy.com/roman/en/catholic-bible-douay-rheims-nt-book-acts-of-apostles-acts-chapter-10/51/10/47

[/quote]

I can see how both those passages identify the explicit desire for Baptism ... both having received the gift of faith upon hearing the Word of God... but I'm wondering whether 'implicit' desire for Baptism recorded by CCC 1260, was always part of this or has it been a later conclusion made sacred by Revelation rather than Bible law? ...

*"Since Christ died for all, and since all men are in fact called to one and the same destiny, which is divine, we must hold that the Holy Spirit offers to all the possibility of being made partakers, in a way known to God, of the Paschal mystery."63 Every man who is ignorant of the Gospel of Christ and of his Church, but seeks the truth and does the will of God in accordance with his understanding of it, can be saved. It may be supposed that such persons would have desired Baptism explicitly if they had known its necessity. *

And CCC 847

*This affirmation is not aimed at those who, through no fault of their own, do not know Christ and his Church:

Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or his Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and, moved by grace, try in their actions to do his will as they know it through the dictates of their conscience - those too may achieve eternal salvation.337*


#19

[quote="Augustine3, post:16, topic:324773"]
Does anybody know?

I’ve asked this question before in another thread but no one answered.

This question has been bugging me for a while so I would really appreciate it if someone help me out?

[/quote]

I understand it to be the life-giving relationship that exists between God (through the body of Christ)... and His people. A relationship animated by the Holy Spirit to be creative and productive here on earth and in the Kingdom to come.

When we speak of the 'life of a marriage', it expresses that life-giving new 'entity' that only exists by union and communion with each other.


#20

Thanks, I really appreciate that! :thumbsup:


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