Excommunicated


#1

Are you excommunicted unofficialy if you commit a mortal sin?

I think so because if you do commit a mortal sin, you are not to recieve the Body of Christ untill you go to confession.


#2

[quote=alterserver_07]Are you excommunicted unofficialy if you commit a mortal sin?

I think so because if you do commit a mortal sin, you are not to recieve the Body of Christ untill you go to confession.
[/quote]

I have had the same thought, but I am not sure.


#3

Yes, you are out of communion when you commit a mortal sin


Are you Catholic? What do you mean “out of communion”? That sound Protestant to me.

Are you saying “out of communion” is the same as excommunication?

Excommunication is an “official” act of the Church. Your phrase “out of communion” is meaningless.


#4

[quote=alterserver_07]Are you excommunicted unofficialy if you commit a mortal sin?
[/quote]

Actually…yes, I think so. That’s exactly why you will go to Hell if you die with an unrepented mortal sin on your soul. At that point in time, you are no longer a part of Christ’s Catholic Church…which is ultimately the only source of salvation. But the hard part comes when you have to take the subjective guilt into consideration, because just because you may have commited an action that is mortally sinful in matter doesn’t necessarily mean that you automatically met all of the conditions to be completely morally accountable for it. And then you take into account the matter of the person potentially having made a sincere act of contrition and immediately repenting of their sinful action. The thing is that it’s just way too complicated and subjective for the Church to be worrying about. It’s your responsibility to follow the moral guidelines of the Church and ultimately stand accountable before God for your actions and the knowledge of those actions taht you had at the time. Shrot Answer: Yes. :rolleyes:


#5

To slightly correct Exporter: “Excommunication” is an official recognition by the Church. The Church cannot excommunicate anyone by its will, however we are all able to render ourselves excommunicate by our obdurateness.

That said, simply committing a mortal sin does not render one excommunicate, though it does separate one from the sacrament of the Eucharist. But the mortal sinner can be restored to the state of grace by the sacrament of Reconciliation.

The excommunicate is not restored so simply, except in very narrow circumstances (such as those outlined in canon 1357, eg)

IANACL*
tee

(* I Am Not A Canon Lawyer)


#6

I would have to agree with tee_eef_em you are not excommunitcated simply by commiting a mortal sin. People who have been excommunicated can not recieve any of the sacraments. Not just the sacrement of the Eucharist. Many of the early Heritics in the early church were in the state of mortal sin by not accepting the teachings of the church and it was more of a grave matter then committing a mortal sin. They completely turn away from the Church and God in believe and preaching what they thought. I would say that you are not excommunicated by committing a mortal sin. The word excommunicated is not one to be tossed around in just every day life. And like tee_eef_em said there are many other procedures that a person who is excommunicated would have to go through then just the sacrament of Reconciliation. That is just my thought and i am not entirely certian i am right but i think i am close. :blessyou:


#7

I am not sure. An example is, if a person has an abortion they are excommunicated. All they have to do to have there excommunication lifted is go to confession.


#8

[quote=Exporter]Yes, you are out of communion when you commit a mortal sin


Are you Catholic? What do you mean “out of communion”? That sound Protestant to me.

Are you saying “out of communion” is the same as excommunication?

Excommunication is an “official” act of the Church. Your phrase “out of communion” is meaningless.
[/quote]

There is the official act of the church to excommunicate someone, and there are acts that cause automatic excommunication. A mortal sin must occur for one to suffer from excommunication.


#9

I suspect you are thnking of “communion” as the sacrament of Eucharist which is not the context in which the OP was using it in. Being out of communion is not meaningless and is often used to describe the state in which we find ourselves when we have ruptured our association or our relationship with Christ in a serious or “grave” way. The state of mortal sin does precisely that, in addition to its other consequences, it does rupture our ongoing relationship with our Creator and that is one of the reasons it takes the Sacrament of Reconciliation to remove the sin and restore us to a state of grace and resume our Eucharistic relationship “in communion” to God and church.


#10

[quote=alterserver_07]Are you excommunicted unofficialy if you commit a mortal sin?

I think so because if you do commit a mortal sin, you are not to recieve the Body of Christ untill you go to confession.
[/quote]

A. There are offenses which cause excommunication.

B. There are offenses which put us in a state of mortal or grave sin.

Sometimes committing B puts us in a state of A. However, not always.

It is not the teaching of the church that all mortal sins excommunicate us,


#11

[quote=HagiaSophia]A. There are offenses which cause excommunication.

B. There are offenses which put us in a state of mortal or grave sin.

Sometimes committing B puts us in a state of A. However, not always.

It is not the teaching of the church that all mortal sins excommunicate us,
[/quote]

Hagia Sophia is absolutely correct. Many mortal sins do not lead to excommunication. Some like participating in an abortion do so automatically. Bishop Bruskewitz in Nebraska has instituted an automatic excommunication for those Catholics in his diocese who persist in belonging to certain groups of dissident Catholics. This would not apply to those in other dioceses, so you see it depends…It strikes me as a shame that so many Catholics no longer understand these things. I am afraid my generation will pay a price for this when we stand before Jesus and have to admit the poor job we have done in educating the last couple of generations in their Faith.


#12

THIS IS COVERED IN THE CATECHISM EXACTLY:

198.62.75.1/www1/CDHN/gravity.html#PROLIFERATION
:thumbsup:


#13

Those under the age of 18 cannot be automatically excommunicated (canon 1323 1°, and canon 1324 §1 4° via §3). Thus, since those under 18 can commit mortal sins, it should be clear that not all mortal sin results in excommunication.

Here are the penalties incurred by excommunication:

Canon 1331 §1 An excommunicated person is forbidden:

to have any ministerial part in the celebration of the Sacrifice of the Eucharist or in any other ceremonies of public worship;

to celebrate the sacraments or sacramentals and to receive the sacraments ;

to exercise any ecclesiastical offices, ministries, functions or acts of governance.


#14

[quote=jimmy]if a person has an abortion they are excommunicated. All they have to do to have there excommunication lifted is go to confession.
[/quote]

Yeah…for the first time. After that, though, the process gets much more complicated. :rolleyes:


#15

[quote=masterjedi747]Yeah…for the first time. After that, though, the process gets much more complicated. :rolleyes:
[/quote]

Does it? I did not know that.


#16

From this article on Abortion and Excommunication:

Nevertheless, the door to reconciliation remains open to the repentant sinner. The bishop of the diocese has authority to remit the automatic excommunication imposed for an abortion. Such remission would normally occur in the Sacrament of Penance.

The bishop in turn may delegate this authority to priest-confessors. Accordingly, in the Priests’ Faculties and Permissions promulgated by the bishop, each priest in the Diocese of Arlington has the authority within the context of the Sacrament of Penance to remit the automatic excommunication and to grant absolution the first time a person confesses having procured or assisted with procuring an abortion.


#17

I think it really depends on the sin. If we got excommunicated for every mortal sin, then there would be some problems with being forgiven (and since mortal sins are forgivable…). However, say for example you violate the Seal of Confession. Mortal sin, excommunication. It really depends.

Eamon


#18

When you commit a mortal sin, you are cut completely off from God’s grace. This is why you need to frequent Confession. If you recieve the Blessed Sacrament in the state of mortal sin, you are commiting a sacralige and you are commiting another mortal sin… this is very bad… when in doubt go to Confession!

God Bless–JMJ
Laura :slight_smile:


#19

But out of God’s grace does not necessarily equate to out of the church, right?

Eamon


#20

There are many mortal sins and most of them do not bring about excommunication. If you are in mortal sin you need to go to Confession, it has little to do with excommunication.

If you promote mortal sin and lead other people to scandal you can be excommunicated.


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