Expose someone who is a fraud?


#1

If you have had experience with someone and have found them to be a fraud, is it your moral obligation to make that known if you know of someone else who is coming under their influence?

How does one reconcile “thou shalt not bear false witness” and all of it tangent implications (ie, detraction, calumny, etc) while at the same time allowing someone to come under the influence of a fraudulent human being


#2

You are being a bit vague. Clearly it depends on what, how, how badly, and even your ability to sway this person. I’m very willing to take your view on this one, whatever it is, but is there a chance your understanding of the situation is inaccurate?


#3

Telling the truth is not bearing false witness. I think it would likely be prudent to give this person a “cease and desist” notice and let them know that you will tell others if they don’t clean up right away.

There is a difference between exposing them out of malice, and doing so that others won’t fall for these scams.


#4

Ok, reading your replies does make me realize that the word “fraud” is too strong.
Perhaps a better way is “two faced”. I have a relative who firmly believes that a “friend” of theirs is authentic. But I have been in company with this “friend” when my relative was not around and what they do is back-stab and speak ill of my relative. I try to tell this “friend” that my relative is a good person; that their values are different from this “friend”

I don’t know how to handle this. My relative can be naive, IMO, at times. I am of the view that the “friend” manipulated my relative.

I dont know if I should say anything to my relative, or keep my mouth shut and not speak ill of the “friend”


#5

I would distance myself from this person and if he questions you as to why, tell him in no uncertain terms that you refuse to put up with backstabbing. As for your relative, I would not expose the friend, because he may not believe you and you end up in a worse situation. Sometimes people have to learn the hard way. Let him realize about the friend on his own. A person’s true nature cannot be hidden for long, so chances are the friend will backstab you or someone else in front of your relative and he will wake up to reality.


#6

If your relative is in danger of being actually harmed, physically, mentally, emotionally or financially, by this false “friend”, then speak up and warn your relative. Be prepared for relative to totally ignore you, but at least you’ll have tried.

If, on the other hand, it’s just a matter of false “friend” gossiping about your relative, and not planning to physically harm them or take their money or anything similar, then just tell the false “friend” gossiper firmly that you don’t want to hear any more badmouthing of your relative, whom you care about. Then distance yourself from the person/ situation.


#7

That could be a sound approach in some cases, but when the two-faced person is your own father, distancing sometimes isn’t an option. Loving him and forgiving him becomes a heavy cross at times.


#8

What kind of fraud are you talking about?


#9

How would it be false witness if you have hard evidence against someone.


#11

Since I have family members that are reading the cultic books “A couse in miracles” and “the disappearance of the universe” whereby the authors maintain the Bible got it all wrong and Jesus told them to rewrite and redo everything, I expose these to awful books at any forum I get (Barnes and Noble; EWTN, Amazon reviews and others). Being the prophetic voice is tough, but just. Take courage and get the facts in order and protect those you care about from the evil assaults of frauds,


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