family synod question

This upcoming synod has me concerned. Divorced and remarried Catholics are objectively in sin. How can there be talk of Communion for them when one cannot receive communion in Mortal sin. Is doctrine going to change? Does this mean that being divorced and remarried is going to be legitimized? Is this synod going to amend the CCC? I feel that the bishops are tampering with Catholic doctrine. Please correct me if I’m wrong.

If you look at the working document the Vatican released earlier this summer, you will see that the Bishops are not being empowered to change doctrine or anything like that. The most likely results, in my opinion, will be a streamlined annulment process for certain types of divorced persons to hasten their return to the Sacraments and enhanced outreach to remarried Catholics to encourage them to engage in the annulment process in the first place.

There may be room to move for a return to the Eucharist for those innocent people subject to another’s divorce. This would not allow for remarriarge without annulment, rather a right to communicate for those with no guilt in a divorce situation.

Church doctrines cannot change.

Hm? Such people are not denied communion now.

There is talk about it but it is not necessarily clear the Synod will move in that direction. That said, the talk isn’t exactly dying down so I would say you (and all of us) should pray for the Synod, that it will not do anything to endanger the faith of ordinary people.

The practice of denying communion to adulterers, by the way, is just that, practice, not doctrine. It is certainly based on doctrine, but it is not doctrine itself. So a change to the practice, while possible, would merely make the Church’s teachings seem incoherent, rather than actually become incoherent. Keep praying.

Even those who are the guilty party in a divorce can return to Communion after a sincere Confession. It’s not the divorce that keeps people from the Sacrament; it’s the subsequent “remarriage” outside of the Church.

I don’t you have anything to be worried about. They will not question or change doctrine. They have already signaled that they think the lack of acceptance of doctrine is poor understanding of the faithful (should be faithless, I guess) and the solution is better teaching, and better pastoral care.

I think that’s naive, people do understand but reject. I think all that’s going to come out of the synod is a whole ‘little tweaks’ but I can’t see any real improvements in acceptance of church teaching, and I certainly don’t see doctrinal change.

If you are a traditionalist, have no fear. If you are a liberal, have no hope.

It’s good to keep in mind that then synod isn’t going to change anything, not even discipline or process. The attendees of the synod will have discussions, submit reports and possibly make some recommendations to the Pope who may or may not act upon them. The synod is not a rule making body but a forum for discussion and sharing of ideas.

It’s interesting that you say the synod is “not a rule making body”. Would this be the same for example for the Synod of Jerusalem in the 70’s AD I believe it was? Before ecumenical councils?

Definitions of words and types of bodies have changed over the years. That was actually called the “Council” (NOT Ecumenical) of Jerusalem, and had a completely different purpose, plus it was nearly 2000 yrs ago and during the infancy of the Church! I believe a Synod can make recommendations for changes to laws, but it takes the pope to approve any changes, as he is the supreme law-giver for the Church…even when an Ecumenical Council is in place.

I think it’s interesting how narrow our views in the US are. We focus on issues like divorce that are widespread here but forget that the Church is a worldwide body with wider concerns. Take a look at the working document for the synod and you’ll see that polygamy, for example, is an issue in other parts of the world. Our concerns are not necessarily the world’s concerns.

The bishops have many topics to discuss. We should pray that they will have the wisdom and guidance they need and then offer them at least a tiny bit of trust. Jesus had some advice regarding these matters: Can any of you by worrying add a moment to your lifespan? If even the smallest things are beyond your control, why are you anxious about the rest? (Luke 12:25-26).

[quote=a83192] This upcoming synod has me concerned. Divorced and remarried Catholics are objectively in sin. How can there be talk of Communion for them when one cannot receive communion in Mortal sin. Is doctrine going to change? Does this mean that being divorced and remarried is going to be legitimized? Is this synod going to amend the CCC? I feel that the bishops are tampering with Catholic doctrine. Please correct me if I’m wrong.
[/quote]

I’m trying not to worry about it. You cannot effect what will occur there. The Bishops will either stay faithful to doctrine or they will not. The Church will either pull ever closer to the world, or be the light on the hill. By their fruits, we will know them.

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That is not correct. Anyone in a state of mortal sin may NOT receive Communion. That is doctrine. Whatever mortal sin it is (e.g. Adultery) does not matter. It is doctrine, and NOT practice.

I think we can all agree that adultery is grave matter. I think where the wiggle room might be is on the issue of culpability (remembering the three conditions for a sin to be mortal). It could very well be that the aggrieved party in a divorce that re-married outside the Church, has remained faithful to the new spouse for many years, and has a family with that spouse, might be seen as having subjectively diminished culpability for an objectively grave sin.

I’m thinking the synod might lean in that direction: study each individual case pastorally, and determine the degree of culpability. Objectively, it is adultery. Subjectively, being (albeit invalidly) married and faithful to that spouse for many years, certainly isn’t same as, say, a married man on a business trip looking to hookup with someone in a bar.

Or it may not go that way at all. It may be as was said, a streamlined annulment process. Who knows? :shrug: We have to trust that the Magisterium will remain faithful to Christ’s teachings in a way that will consider the pastoral care of a very large and growing demographic. So I prefer “just in time worrying”. Why worry about something that hasn’t even happened yet?

:rolleyes:

Ok, let me rephrase: modern day synods are not set up as rule making bodies. This one was certainly not called for that purpose.

Allowing the remarried to receive Communion would require a change in canon law permitting those in a state of mortal sin to receive Communion. I really can’t see any other way. No, merely rewording how we think about remarriage won’t work because the validity of the marriage is determined by the Church, not by individuals. It would be like allowing individual Catholics to decide whether one has received holy orders. Your marriage is valid or not based purely on the determination of the Church.

So my best guess is that there will be no change in this regard. There are lots of other areas they can address. Annulment process, canonical form, gay unions, baptism for children born out of wedlock…

Well one thing that cannot be allowed change, change in canon law or not, is those in mortal sin to receive the body and blood.

Hi,
I’m really don’t feel qualified to make a post or comment on this subject/thread.

What I would like to do, is thank you for bringing to light, for me, this passage of Luke 12:25-26.
It on it’s own is awesome, but, for me personally it’s a great gift, it appears I stumbled upon it…but not so ,for,I believe there are no coincidences.
Thank you for being the messenger!
God bless
Peace…Martin Pastore.

That is simply not correct. You don’t earn reduced culpability by having a family with and staying faithful to a mistress.

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