Famine declared in South Sudan; 4.9 million people need urgent help


#1

Famine in South Sudan has left 100,000 people on the verge of starvation and almost 5 million people, more than 40% of the country’s population, in need of urgent help, aid agencies say.

People are already dying of hunger, and another 1 million people are on the brink of famine, UN agencies said.

cnn.com/2017/02/20/africa/south-sudan-famine/index.html


#2

Not so sure whether South Sudan is included in the banned list. If not maybe the US can take them. They need help too. Hopefully the USCCB would make a statement on this.


#3

South Sudan is a Catholic country. Unfortunately, the US government is slow to catch up. One of Australia’s NBA players was questioned by US immigration after a game against Toronto Raptors because he was born in what was known as Sudan before the split. He is Catholic.

North Sudan is muslim.


#4

Thanks.

Hope they are given equal importance like the other immigrants that have recived so much support from the clergy. It seems many Christian destitutes are consigned into obscurity and not known by our world. Perhaps it is because they do not know to speak out their predicament to let people know about them.


#5

Praying for aide delivered to these Sudanese people and that the famine will end.


#6

It’s a war zone.

There are many such places around the globe.

The United Nations COULD set up sanctuary areas close by and provide food, water and shelter until the local conflict ends.

A few years back, when Russia invaded Afghanistan, that situation created the largest refugee mess in the world. People fled into Pakistan and Iran. Millions of people. Russia planted land mines shaped like toys to explode when children picked them up … caused a terrible awful situation.

I recall hosting a nurse from Medecins Sans Frontieres. [Doctors Without Borders] Showed slides and gave a talk at our Social Concerns Committee.

The major shock to our parishioners was that there were no telephone poles in the camps … she explained that there was no electricity.

It’s a different world.

One of my friends is from Eritrea … which is next to Ethiopia. Similar situation. Terrible local war. He is Christian Eritrean but thought he passed for Ethiopian … his whole family was wiped out but thought he was successfully concealing himself. One day his boss called him … he had gone to engineering school locally … and handed him a Fulbright Scholarship and said “TAKE IT.” My friend clearly was next to be killed but his boss was friendly and wanted him out of there. So my friend was able to flee to the U.S.

He is the sole survivor of his family.

That conflict attracted almost no attention … so the genocide went on and on. With no notice or protest from the outside. Russia supported the other side.


#7

Praying…

Our Father…

Hail Mary…

And also:

crs.org/get-involved/advocate/public-policy/emergency-humanitarian-response-south-sudan


#8

We have a considerable South Sudanese population in our town. They arrived as refugees from the war. They are the most active parishioners in parish life. First to volunteer for parish activities. Very devout Catholics.


#9

I would have no objection to bringing in refugees from there, though I do wonder about the language situation.

But I wonder what would prevent this country bringing food to south Sudan. After all, it appears Mexico isn’t going to buy our corn anymore.:wink: So maybe these people could be aided in their own country.


#10

This is an opportunity for Trump and the USCCB to do the right things. It remains to be seen whether either of them will.

Here’s something surprising. The official language of South Sudan is English. I don’t know many actually speak it, but one would think many or most would have at least some familiarity with it.


#11

I might not could help with my money (yes, that is gramatically correct in the American south), as I don’t really have any, but I will help with my prayers. Lord Jesus, have mercy.


#12

I am not sure of a workable solution when the worst dilemma is the Government of South Sudan blocking aid to the needy. Well, outside of a multinational military intervention, and that doesn’t seem plausible.


#13

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