Fasting and midnight

Hello everyone,

I have a question regarding fasting on Good Friday. I am a runner (I run three miles a few days a week) and so I eat a lot more than your average person. Since I knew I was going to be fasting on Good Friday, I decided not to run on Good Friday. However, I did go for a run on Holy Thursday. I ended up eating some food close to midnight on Holy Thursday - nothing with meat in it. I ended up eating some vegetables (green peas) and didn’t finish eating until 12:02 am on Good Friday. Did this break my rules of fasting on Good Friday?

Today is Good Friday, and I have been fasting. I ate a small breakfast, a small lunch, and I’m going to have a normal size dinner. As of now, I’m very hungry and certainly fasting, but did the fact that I was finishing a meal on Thursday that ran into Friday break my rules of fasting?

I have heard that you’re supposed to eat two small meals and one normal meal when fasting. I’m just concerned that, by the end of the day, I will have had two small meals, one big meal, and the remainder of a meal from Holy Thursday that went into Good Friday.

As mentioned, I am certainly fasting today since I am very hungry, but did I break my fasting rule? I didn’t know if the two small meals/one normal meal was a requirement or just a suggestion to fast. If I did break this fasting rule, is it a sin? Mortal or venial? What do you think? Thanks, much appreciated.

God Bless.

You sound as though you have scrupulosity. I suggest you get with your priest for guidance.

No, you didn’t break fasting rules by starting a meal on Thursday that ended with a few bites of green beans at 2 minutes past midnight.

I think you are scrupulous and should follow the advice of your priest when you are able to talk to him.

You have not committed a sin.

Thank you very much for your response, I appreciate it! I have only vaguely heard of scrupulosity, I will be sure to look into it more and talk with my priest about it. I really appreciate your kind post! Thanks again, God Bless.

the reason the size of the two small meals is deliberately vague is to allow for the needs of those whose work or avocations cause them to have higher energy needs than the norm. 2 minutes is not going to make or break your fast. Don’t look at the clock to answer such questions, look into your heart. What are you doing for love of Christ who died for you?

Since we are on Daylight Saving Time it was actually only 11:02. :smiley:

He may be in Arizona.:smiley:

I disagree with those above who say that 2 minutes of eating on Friday morning doesn’t count as eating on Friday. However, I agree with their conclusion, that you shouldn’t sweat it.

I may be mistaken about this, but I believe the 1 big and 2 small idea is not a strict rule in itself, but a guideline or interpretation as to what constitutes fasting. If your approach to fasting differs markedly (2 small meals and 3 large ones), the guideline is there to help you realize you may be off track. On the other hand, suppose you had one small meal, plus at six different times during the day you ate a single small teaspoon of green peas. Rather strange, but while that fast is different, it’s still roughly equivalent. In your case, a few spoonfuls of peas, that probably wouldn’t even have pushed one of your small meals into the “big” category, and that were part of the previous night’s meal, doesn’t really change your overall Friday fast. I think you’re in the clear.

On the other hand, if you prefer to adhere fastidiously to the exact rule, you can wait until midnight and have a massive feast, and that would be completely legit. I tend to think the first approach is more in keeping with what the Church wants.

Thank you very much for your posts everyone, I sincerely appreciate that advice! Oh and, good thinking, I live on the East Coast so technically it was 11:02! Haha :smiley: God Bless!

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.