Fatherhood by Surrogacy


#1

Fatherhood by a New Formula

[/font]http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A16533-2005Jan17.html?sub=AR

Despite contracts that promise confidentiality to donors, Caplan and Andrews predict that in 20 years children created through anonymous egg or sperm donation will come looking for their biological parents, as did adoptees of an earlier era.

Egg donors are usually paid $7,500, while surrogates receive $20,000 for a single baby and $25,000 for twins. All expenses, including fees for outside lawyers to represent the interests of each woman, are paid by the prospective father. Egg donors and prospective parents are not told each others’ last names to minimize the possibility of claims of custody or financial support.

acquisition of certified college transcripts and sometimes SAT scores. Applicants must submit a recent photo – some fathers say they want a donor who resembles them or a relative – and complete a 12-page questionnaire that asks them, among other things, to rate the condition of their teeth.

“It was very important to me to look the egg donor in the eye,” said Scott, who met with five candidates. A 90-minute meeting at Starbucks, he noted wryly, is “not a lot to choose the mother of your child.”

The surrogates’ 30-page contracts specify how much caffeine they can drink and which hair products they can use, and state that they are subject to random drug and alcohol testing. “Everything is negotiated,” Hinson said.

the relationships are based on trust

“I don’t know if it’s a decision that’s any different than a straight couple makes,” said Michael Thorne-Begland, 35, who has been with his partner for 12 years.

Michael Thorne-Begland’s sister agreed to donate her eggs.


#2

[quote=Gabriel Gale]Fatherhood by a New Formula

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A16533-2005Jan17.html?sub=AR

Despite contracts that promise confidentiality to donors, Caplan and Andrews predict that in 20 years children created through anonymous egg or sperm donation will come looking for their biological parents, as did adoptees of an earlier era.

[/quote]

Yes they will. They already have. I saw a piece on one of the TV news magazines some time ago about a girl who went looking for, and found, her sperm-donor father. It was a good reunion. But he was a little worried, because if all his offspring come looking for him, there could be dozens.


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