Fear of Joining


#1

I was born into a protestant family…Methodist to be exact. I am marrying a Catholic man this summer and for our relationship, the family we will have, and because the gap between my veiws and the veiws of the Methodist church seems to widen every four years, I have decided to become Catholic.
I actually came here to ask a question today, but harsh posts in this forum have made me apprehensive about asking. I grew up in a family where my dad’s side was Catholic and my mom’s side Methodist. My ancestors left Poland in part to protect their freedom to be Catholic. I embrace my Catholic heritage.
All things considered, had I posted a message telling of my frustrations with going to mass and crying every time because I am heartbroken that I am not able to participate…I have a feeling this forum would take my already broken heart and stomp on it a few more times. So, please, only those with KIND and GENTLE hearts, try to answer the question of one of your sisters in Christ.
Why? I say “Just say the words…” just like the rest of you. I’ve been baptized. I’ve studied the word of the Lord (extensively). I especially hold dear the Gospels…
On a closing note: be kind to those left singing the hymn while you get the great holy honour of partaking in Communion. Know there are some of us out there who would eagerly trade positions with you.


#2

To quote the opening words of our current Holy Father’s pontificate: Be Not Afraid!
You will surely run across many who will ‘stomp’ on you for the simple fact that you are not Catholic but obviously they are off base. It is sad, and you are right in being saddened, by the fact that Christian unity is not perfect at this point in time. One is tempted to doubt that it ever will be especially when Catholics, who should know best of all, fail so miserably to follow Christ in certain instances.
You should not, however, think that any church will be filled with saints; such is not the case in this valley of tears. If you feel called to enter the Church then rest assured Christ will give you the grace to deal with those whom you find repugnant. So too will He give you the grace to realize they ways in which you offend others.
I will keep you in my prayers and hope that the fear you experience be cast from your heart. May God give you peace!


#3

[quote=meganfae]I was born into a protestant family…Methodist to be exact. I am marrying a Catholic man this summer and for our relationship, the family we will have, and because the gap between my veiws and the veiws of the Methodist church seems to widen every four years, I have decided to become Catholic.
I actually came here to ask a question today, but harsh posts in this forum have made me apprehensive about asking. I grew up in a family where my dad’s side was Catholic and my mom’s side Methodist. My ancestors left Poland in part to protect their freedom to be Catholic. I embrace my Catholic heritage.
All things considered, had I posted a message telling of my frustrations with going to mass and crying every time because I am heartbroken that I am not able to participate…I have a feeling this forum would take my already broken heart and stomp on it a few more times. So, please, only those with KIND and GENTLE hearts, try to answer the question of one of your sisters in Christ.
Why? I say “Just say the words…” just like the rest of you. I’ve been baptized. I’ve studied the word of the Lord (extensively). I especially hold dear the Gospels…
On a closing note: be kind to those left singing the hymn while you get the great holy honour of partaking in Communion. Know there are some of us out there who would eagerly trade positions with you.
[/quote]

Ask your question Megan. I find most of the people on this forum to be very kind, loving and informative. You will sometimes see harsh responses when the Catholic faith is being attacked by anti-Catholic rumors and stereotypes. This is usually a defensive tone but unfortunately sometimes unhealthy passion takes over. So go ahead and ask your question–I’m sure it will be answered with love and gentileness.

:love:


#4

Thank you Doctor Subtilis for your kind words and your prayers.
Mickey, I assure you, I have no intention of attacking the Church (I wouldnt be joining if I didnt respect Her), I just came here curious to learn more, but have decided upon further examination of this forum, to instead ask a Catholic friend.


#5

Megan,

Be not afraid!

Pio


#6

[quote=meganfae]Thank you Doctor Subtilis for your kind words and your prayers.
Mickey, I assure you, I have no intention of attacking the Church (I wouldnt be joining if I didnt respect Her), I just came here curious to learn more, but have decided upon further examination of this forum, to instead ask a Catholic friend.
[/quote]

I know you won’t attack the Church Megan…you seem quite sincere. But others do attack, and that’s why some of the responses here are overly passionate. Here’s an example on a large scale: For 2000 years, the Church believed in the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist. It was not defined. It was considered “a mystery”. When protestantism attacked the concept of the real presence, the Roman Catholic Church defined it as “transubstantiation”. Now that it was defined, some protestant churches attacked it even more harshly. You see, Some Catholics can be a little gun shy because of exposure to anti-Catholicism. Please don’t judge them to harshly. It is okay to ask a trusted Catholic friend! God Bless you!

:slight_smile:


#7

Megan, perhaps I’m just dense but what is your question? If you are on your way to joining the Church, then it is a matter of time before you are accepted and can participate in the Mass. I am currently in RICA and look forward to becoming a Catholic at our Easter vigil. Are you in RCIA or other system to become a Catholic? Your thread title said “fear of joining.” If that is your question, do you have any specifics? What are you afraid of?

Lisa N


#8

[quote=meganfae]IOn a closing note: be kind to those left singing the hymn while you get the great holy honour of partaking in Communion. Know there are some of us out there who would eagerly trade positions with you.
[/quote]

did you know that when we participate in the Eucharist, whether wholly through receiving the Body and Blood of Christ, or spiritually by uniting our hearts to Christ and each other, we partake of the graces of the sacrament, which enrich all those gathered, the entire Church, and through the Church, the entire world. That is the meaning of sacrament, Christ made present through efficacious signs. so welcome and may your hunger for the Eucharist be the spark that enlivens an apathetic Catholic to greater love and appreciation for the great gift that is his.


#9

megan I will pray for you, greetings


#10

[quote=meganfae]I was born into a protestant family…Methodist to be exact. I am marrying a Catholic man this summer and for our relationship, the family we will have, and because the gap between my veiws and the veiws of the Methodist church seems to widen every four years, I have decided to become Catholic.
I actually came here to ask a question today, but harsh posts in this forum have made me apprehensive about asking. I grew up in a family where my dad’s side was Catholic and my mom’s side Methodist. My ancestors left Poland in part to protect their freedom to be Catholic. I embrace my Catholic heritage.
All things considered, had I posted a message telling of my frustrations with going to mass and crying every time because I am heartbroken that I am not able to participate…I have a feeling this forum would take my already broken heart and stomp on it a few more times. So, please, only those with KIND and GENTLE hearts, try to answer the question of one of your sisters in Christ.
Why? I say “Just say the words…” just like the rest of you. I’ve been baptized. I’ve studied the word of the Lord (extensively). I especially hold dear the Gospels…
On a closing note: be kind to those left singing the hymn while you get the great holy honour of partaking in Communion. Know there are some of us out there who would eagerly trade positions with you.
[/quote]

Dear Meganfae, (BTW, I love that Irish name!)
God forgive us if we have so filled you with fear.
I cry at communion too Meganfae…but only because I am overwhelmed by who I am receiving and what my sins cost Him. Are you in RCIA yet? If not get your Beloved to sponsor you as I did my Beloved and share that experience. We’re learning all kinds of stuff and it’s great. Has no one taught you The Act of Spiritual Communion?

Here:

My Jesus,
I believe that You
are present in the Most Holy Sacrament.
I love You above all things,
and I desire to receive You into my soul.
Since I cannot at this moment
receive You sacramentally,
come at least spiritually into my heart. I embrace You as if You were already there and unite myself wholly to You. Never permit me to be separated from You.

Amen.
Pax vobiscum,http://pages.prodigy.net/bestsmileys1/emoticons3/welcome8.GIF


#11

[quote=meganfae]I was born into a protestant family…Methodist to be exact. I am marrying a Catholic man this summer and for our relationship, the family we will have, and because the gap between my veiws and the veiws of the Methodist church seems to widen every four years, I have decided to become Catholic.
I actually came here to ask a question today, but harsh posts in this forum have made me apprehensive about asking. I grew up in a family where my dad’s side was Catholic and my mom’s side Methodist. My ancestors left Poland in part to protect their freedom to be Catholic. I embrace my Catholic heritage.
All things considered, had I posted a message telling of my frustrations with going to mass and crying every time because I am heartbroken that I am not able to participate…I have a feeling this forum would take my already broken heart and stomp on it a few more times. So, please, only those with KIND and GENTLE hearts, try to answer the question of one of your sisters in Christ.
Why? I say “Just say the words…” just like the rest of you. I’ve been baptized. I’ve studied the word of the Lord (extensively). I especially hold dear the Gospels…
On a closing note: be kind to those left singing the hymn while you get the great holy honour of partaking in Communion. Know there are some of us out there who would eagerly trade positions with you.
[/quote]

Hi meganfae! :wave:

Welcome home! I’m overjoyed to welcome you into the
family!!! http://cdn-cf.aol.com/se/clip_art/gstres/celebrte/hug

To be “in communion” with one’s faith community is very different to a Catholic and a Protestant. In Protestant churches one is spiritually in communion with all other Christians simply be virtue of their common belief in Christ. For this reason, regardless of the truths that one embraces, all are welcome at the table. Also, the bread and wine in Protestant churches, while important sybmolically, are simply bread and wine. One cannot sin against bread and wine.

To Catholics being “in communion” is more than just a spiritual commonality. While we do share a common belief in Christ, we also share a common faith Those who are able are expected to declare their intention to be educated in that faith and then publically profess that faith and their intention to embrace it and live it as part of the community. Only then can the person partake in what is really and truly and body, blood, soul, and divinity of Jesus Christ.

There is no “just me and Jesus” in the Catholic Church. While one’s relationship with Christ is, indeed, personal there’s more to it than that. To have a relationship with Christ is to also have a relationship with his Body, the Church. The two are absolutely inseparable. To be “in communion” in the Catholic Church is to embrace the Body of Christ in its entirety, not just the Head. To truly embrace Christ one must embrace all of him.

I hope that helps somewhat. If it raises more questions please feel free to ask!!

In Christ,
Nancy :slight_smile:


#12

Ask as many questions as you want, some posts do seem less than charitable, but than can be because others come here attacking, instead of being polite about it.
So God bless you in your search for truth, I hope you find it.


#13

I can completely understand your heartbreak. I’ve got much personal history tied up in this one, but I won’t bore you details. Suffice it to say, I left the Church over it for a few years. I’ll share a couple of things I’ve learned with you.
First, the Church does make rare exceptions for protestants to recieve communion. I believe these need dispensation from the bishop.
Cathechism of the Catholic Church 1401:
"When in the Ordinary’s judgement, a grave necessity arises, Catholic ministers may give the sacraments of Eucharist, Penance and Anointing of the Sick to other Christian not in full communion with the Catholic Church, who ask for them of their own will, provided they give evidence of holding the Catholic faith regarding these sacraments and posses the required dispositions.:

Secondly, the Church has biblical bases to deny communion to those who don’t discern the body and blood of Christ correctly. 1 Corinthians 11:27.29 Therefore whoever eats the bread or dringks the cup of the Lork unworthily will have to answer for the body and blood of the Lord…for anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body, eats and drinks judment on himself. Our priests and bishops will have to answer to God for how they care for us, including if they allow us to eat and drink judgment upon ourselves.

That said, as you are in RCIA, you will soon be in full communion with the Catholic Church. Maybe it would help to think of this time of waiting as your engagement to Christ. Eucharist will come at the Wedding, when the Bridegroom gives Himself to you fully! And what a wedding feast you’ll have!


#14

LOL, I guess if anyone attacks your posts, your going to have a whole lot of people attack that other person right back.

Be not afraid. Others may know more than you, so what. Others may look without mercy on you, so what. You might not understand everything, so what. Keep seeking Jesus and figuring out and doing the will of God and you will be a sister of Jesus. Have no worries about asking others for help, for one day you’ll be helping others yourself. To those who give no help, forgive them, we all have our moments.

If you desire a little homework, well keep praying and meditate on passages of a poor little Jewish girl/woman, Mary. She always sought Jesus even if she didn’t understand everything and then she keep those things in her heart pounding on them.


#15

Thank you for your kind help.
So my next question…why dont you sing the whole hymn?
Us Methodists love our hymn…I actually have most of the hymnal memorized (as John Wesley suggested). Music is so much like a prayer…you find music all through the Bible.
Over Christmas, I was unable to attend the church services at home because I was recovering from a surgery (nothing big, but it was right before Christmas), but a week later I was able to attend with my fiance at his family’s church…the hymn was “We Three Kings” and I’m singing it from memory as Christmas hymns are my second favorite kind (Easter is #1…“Christ the Lord is Risen Today…Hallelujah!”) and they only sang the first two verses. They just skipped over the verses about the last two gifts given. Those gifts are so symbolic…anyway, we sang it the next Sunday in my church…the whole song and I cried (I’m a baby). This has happened many times.
So, my question: Why don’t you sing the whole song? Is there a real reason or is it just an issue of time?
I submit this knowing you’re a gentle and wise audience.


#16

meganfae,i,m a newbie to this forum and i can really relate to this thread,i to am joining rcia in 2 weeks,i was raised lutheran,then became anglican,my wifes catholic and i have been attending mass with her nearly every sunday for the past 2 yrs,it kills me not to be able to receive our lords body and blood in the eucharist.i have felt a pull towards catholicism for most of my adult life but have always argued myself out of conversion,this time i,ll listen to the holy spirit and my heart and follow through!i,ve read everything i could get my hands on about catholicism for the past 5 yrs,i,m ready to come home,i hope i can get accelerated through the process and be received in this easter!best of luck,celt


#17

[quote=azcelt]meganfae,i,m a newbie to this forum and i can really relate to this thread,i to am joining rcia in 2 weeks,i was raised lutheran,then became anglican,my wifes catholic and i have been attending mass with her nearly every sunday for the past 2 yrs,it kills me not to be able to receive our lords body and blood in the eucharist.i have felt a pull towards catholicism for most of my adult life but have always argued myself out of conversion,this time i,ll listen to the holy spirit and my heart and follow through!i,ve read everything i could get my hands on about catholicism for the past 5 yrs,i,m ready to come home,i hope i can get accelerated through the process and be received in this easter!best of luck,celt
[/quote]

It’s great to hear from someone who understands where I’m coming from. I too felt a pull toward Catholicism through most of my life. My dad was Catholic and decided to attend church with my mother so our family would worship together. My parents have taught us to have a great respect for the Catholic Church. Now I’m getting married to a Catholic and I am almost ready to become Catholic as well.
Thanks for your kind words. God bless


#18

More than anything, I think one it’s an issue of time and two the Mass is centered around Jesus in the word and in the Eurcharist. Having the body, blood, soul and divinity of Jesus is the very best the Mass has to offer. Even in what would seem like a poorly done Mass, thinking like the priest racing through things or terrible music, it is still profitable because Jesus is there. So other things like the singing and such are secondary. From there it comes down to an issue of time.

But you are very blessed to have a love of the music. It is a form of praying. Infact I think it was St. Augistine that said those who sing (spacificly in the choir) pray twice. I gotta go, but I’ll get back to this. I just wanted to make sure you atleast had a quick answer. Keep up your love of the singing. Keep struggling and trying to have conversion. Your in my prayers.


#19

Meganfae,

Music indeed has a place in the Church’s liturgy. But it is not the center of Catholic worship. The center of our worship is our Eucharistic Lord.

Pio


#20

[quote=meganfae]It’s great to hear from someone who understands where I’m coming from. I too felt a pull toward Catholicism through most of my life. My dad was Catholic and decided to attend church with my mother so our family would worship together. My parents have taught us to have a great respect for the Catholic Church. Now I’m getting married to a Catholic and I am almost ready to become Catholic as well.
Thanks for your kind words. God bless
[/quote]

**

meganfae,
We don’t always sing all the verses, though the one you mentioned was sung all the way through on the feast of the Epiphany**


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