Feast of the Assumption


#1

I understand that this August 15th is the Feast of the Assumption; A celebration to remember that Mary was taken into heaven, body and soul.

Is my interpretation of the word “assumption” correct - we have no proof that Mary was taken into heaven, body and soul?

If so, how did this celebration, based on lack of proof, become a dogma (in 1950 by Pope Pius XII) which implies that is it truth?


#2

No, “assumption” in this case means “to be taken up into heaven”. Jesus ascended into heaven of his own power; Mary was assumed into heaven by God.

I suggest you read the Catholic Encyclopedia’s entry on The Feast of the Assumption. The corporeal assumption of Mary into heaven has been a long-standing belief in the Church – it didn’t appear in 1949. The revelation of this dogma is based not only upon traditional and pious writings of early Christians, but also upon study of Scripture. The Apostolic Constitution Munificentissimus Deus defines this dogma; I can’t really top Pope Pius XII in explaining it.


#3

Amen.
Nothing beats reading the official decree - in full - on your own.


#4

Hi Charlie,

The constant and universal belief of the Church is proof.

Verbum


#5

I think Scripture’s depiction of Mary as the New Ark of the Covenant best describes her bodily entrance into Heaven.

Psalm 132:8 says, “rise, O LORD, to Your resting place,You and the ark of Your strength.”

Now this is a clear reference from 2 Chronicles 6:41, but once you pick apart how all those things are fulfilled in the New Covenant, Mary’s Assumption becomes clear.

OLD COVENANT
Lord - God’s presence within the Ark of the Covenant
Resting Place - The Tabernacle (which was modeled after the tabernacle in Heaven
Ark - Gold Box containing the 10 commandments, a jar of manna (“bread from heaven”), and Aaron’s priestly staff.

NEW COVENANT
Lord - Jesus, in the flesh
Resting Place - Heaven Itself (particularly the Heavenly tabernacle)
Ark - Mary, who bore in her the fulfillment of the law, the true bread come from heaven, and the eternal high priest.

Also, even though he didn’t explicitly mention it, St. Gregory Thaumaturgus cited the very Psalm I mentioned above with Mary, and he died in 270 A.D.!

“Let us chant the melody which has been taught us by the inspired harp of David, and say, ‘Arise, O Lord, into Thy rest; Thou, and the Ark of Thy sanctuary.’ For the holy Virgin is in truth an Ark, wrought with gold both within and without, that has received the whole treasury of the sanctuary" ~St. Gregory Thaumaturgus


closed #6

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